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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2011
Billboard.com reports that Ke$ha will not be touring Japan. She said in a statement: "My heart is with Japan right now through this disaster and these hardships. I genuinely don't think right now would be appropriate timing for me to perform in Japan given the content and the spirit of my show, which is all about feeling exuberant, rowdy, and wild. I plan to bring my party there and to that part of the world when we are all ready to dance and Get $leazy together again. In the meantime I am going to do everything I can to help relief efforts and I encourage everyone in the world to do the same.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Following the bleak assessment by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the ongoing crisis in Japan, the State Department issued a travel warning that "strongly" urged Americans in the country to leave. Fears of a meltdown prompted Temple University to begin making plans to return about 200 students who remain on its Tokyo campus. The University of Pennsylvania announced it was canceling its smaller study-abroad program in that country. The Temple contingent is expected to fly home Saturday, a university spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Mainstream animation in this country is still limited by the age of its target audience. The Japanese epic Princess Mononoke is a wonderful example of what liberation can do for an art form. Part eco-fable and part saga that refers to the myths that recur in many cultures and religions, Princess Mononoke is the work of Hayao Miyazaki - a master animator revered by the artists at the Disney Studio and its rivals. The film was released in Japan three years ago and became a huge box office success.
SPORTS
August 27, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT - Arms outstretched in the air with a smile from ear-to-ear, Noriatsu Osaka couldn't contain his glee. Neither could his teammates from Tokyo after Osaka's third home run of the game put an exclamation point on Japan's 12-2 victory over Tennessee in five innings in the Little League World Series title game Sunday. Osaka, 12, added a triple for good measure, too, to top off his 4-for-4 day. In a symbolic gesture, Japan's players jogged the traditional postgame victory lap carrying the flags for both their home country and the United States.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The first clear outlines of a new world order were displayed at the summit meeting here as the United States bowed to demands by Japan and Western Europe to set their own economic courses. On issues ranging from aid to the Soviet Union and China to agricultural subsidies and environmental protection, Japan, West Germany and the European Economic Community flexed economic muscles that are beginning to compete with traditional U.S. strength. Japan, usually isolated and defensive at these annual summits of the major industrial democracies, went on the offensive.
SPORTS
March 6, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
South Korea upset Japan, 3-2, yesterday to win Group A in the first round of the inaugural World Baseball Classic, with Lee Seung-yeop hitting a go-ahead, two-run homer in the eighth inning of a game that mattered little because both nations were assured of advancing. Former Met Dae-Sung Koo pitched two scoreless innings of relief to get the win for South Korea, which overcame a two-run deficit, and Chan Ho Park of the Padres retired the side in the ninth for the save. In another game, Chen Yung-Chi hit a grand slam in the fourth inning to lead Taiwan past China, 12-3.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on rumor, innuendo, colleagues' exaggerations and Daily News wire services. Got a rumor or innuendo to share? Try wiggsd@phillynews.com
IT'S WAR! Just like the good old days. We're reading again about Japan preparing to dispatch naval vessels and Germany bickering over troop movements. America and England, allies to the last. Where is old Adolf? What about Winston and FDR and Tojo? Now that was a real war, eh, boys? But today the script seems twisted. Our Germany is one of the good guys and is arguing over whether to mobilize troops. Japan is also a good guy, and it's taking military action in a war situation for the first time since that other war. Germany's government is trying to mobilize 3,900 troops for the Afghan war. German pacifists (pacifists?
SPORTS
August 26, 2012 | Associated Press
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Brock Myers hit a tie-breaking double, and Goodlettsville, Tenn., gave up a 10-run lead in the bottom of the sixth before scoring nine in the seventh in a 24-16 victory over Petaluma, Calif., on Saturday for a berth in the Little League World Series title game. Only California's 10-run comeback to send the game into extra innings tied at 15 could overshadow Tennessee slugger Lorenzo Butler's extraordinary day at the plate. Butler set a single-game record with nine RBIs, and tied a record with three homers to lead Tennessee.
SPORTS
September 23, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees outfielder Paul O'Neill said he would seriously explore playing in Japan if the baseball labor crisis threatens next season, according to a published report. O'Neill, whose .359 batting average was the best in the American League this season, told the New York Post in yesterday's editions that Japan might be an option if it looked like the 1995 season could be fragmented or canceled. The failure of owners and players to reach a new collective- bargaining agreement caused the cancellation of the 1994 World Series last week.
SPORTS
November 14, 1994 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
General manager Lee Thomas has one less decision to make as he ponders who will play leftfield for the Phillies whenever play might resume. He can say sayonara to Pete Incaviglia, who has signed a one-year contract with the Chibe Lotte Lions in Japan. Incaviglia, who had 24 home runs and 89 RBI while being used primarily as a platoon player in 1993, talked openly about exploring opportunities in Japan after the players' strike wiped out the remainder of last season. Thomas, who is looking for a righthanded power hitter to play left, made it clear that he hadn't closed the door on any of the Phillies' free agents but that he would wait for baseball's uncertain labor situation to clear before making any firm offers.
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NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. airlines are expecting their busiest summer ever, with 222 million travelers - or 2.4 million a day - expected to fly between June 1 and August 31, Airlines for America, the industry group for U.S. carriers, said Monday. The 4.5 percent increase from last summer will include 31 million travelers on international flights. To accommodate the anticipated busy summer travel season, airlines are adding flights and seats, and deploying larger aircraft, said John Heimlich, chief economist for the Washington, D.C. trade group.
SPORTS
February 12, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JULIO FRANCO played his first major league game for the Phillies on a chilly Friday night in April 1982. Went 1-for-4 in a 9-2 loss to the Cardinals at the Vet. Bob Forsch got the win. Mike Krukow took the loss. You can look it up. This April, the 56-year-old Franco will be player-manager of the semi-pro Ishikawa Million Stars in Japan. It will not be his first trip to the Land of the Rising Sun. In 1995, following the major leagues' strike season, he played for Chiba Lotte Marines in the Pacific League.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
JAPANESE NATIONALISTS are in a tizzy over Angelina Jolie 's new movie, "Unbroken," the story of U.S. Olympian and World War II POW Louis Zamperini . According to Zamperini's story and the book about him by Laura Hillenbrand , Zamperini wasn't treated too well by Japanese guards while he was being held captive. But protesters claim that the depiction is unfair and untrue, and the London Telegraph says that those criticizing the film are trying to have it banned from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several nationalist groups in Japan have called for the country to ban Angelina Jolie because of her film Unbroken , which, they claim, represents Japanese officers during WWII in a negative light. Jolie's film tells the story of real-life Olympian Louis Zamperini , an Army Air Forces second lieutenant taken prisoner by the Japanese. One scene has an imperial officer named Mutsuhiro Watanabe mercilessly beating the American. The film is based on Laura Hillenbrand 's biography of the same name and Zamperini's own accounts.
SPORTS
November 16, 2014
Mariners star Robinson Cano is expected to miss three to four weeks after breaking a toe during the Major League Baseball All-Stars tour of Japan. Seattle said Saturday that Cano will not need a cast and that the injury will heal with rest. He will likely be able to resume baseball activities in mid-December. The second baseman was hit by a pitch on the right foot during a 4-0 loss in Tokyo on Saturday. X-rays revealed a fracture in his small toe. Cano signed a $240 million, 10-year contract with the Mariners before last season.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You may not agree with what central banks are doing worldwide, but their actions will force stock markets to levitate, says one prominent local money manager. David Kotok, chairman and chief investment officer at Cumberland Advisors in Vineland, argues that Friday's announcement by the Bank of Japan strongly increasing its quantitative-easing program represents a "massive, bullish shift for many stock markets worldwide. Included in the shift are Japan and its associated markets but also, importantly, the United States," he contends.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Felice Fischer, longtime curator of Japanese and east Asian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Rays, by the government of Japan. Ambassador Sumio Kusaka, consul general of Japan in New York, is scheduled to confer the distinction in an award ceremony to be held at the museum Tuesday. Fischer, who joined the Art Museum in 1972, is being honored for her "lifetime achievement," Kusaka said in a statement. "The Emperor of Japan honors Dr. Fischer as a recipient of an imperial decoration and one of the highest civilian honors in recognition of her lifetime achievement and commitment to excellence, particularly including significant contributions to mutual understanding and friendship between the United States and Japan," Kusaka said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Is there a more terrifying line than Mark Antony's in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar : "Cry, 'Havoc!' And let slip the dogs of war"? This powerful play is about self-deluded warrior-politicians; it is filled with conspiracy, ambition, corruption, betrayal, and tyranny. And if the leaders are vicious, the public, easily manipulated, is worse. The Lantern Theatre production, under the direction of Charles McMahon, is both intriguing and frustrating. Julius Caesar is a play for all times, as Shakespeare's plays always turn out to be, whether the setting is ancient Rome or the forest of Arden.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KUMIKO MIYAMOTO grew up in a world torn apart by bombs and racked by poverty. Her childhood was spent in Osaka, Japan, during World War II, and it became a target of American bombing raids. When she was evacuated to the countryside, she was exposed to hunger so intense, she remembered seeing people eating grass. But after the war, she met and married an American soldier, came to the U.S. in 1952, and lived the rest of her life as an American wife, mother and government worker.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert R. Weiman Sr., 88, of Wynnewood, an attorney in Philadelphia for 50 years, died Monday, Nov. 4, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. After training at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Mr. Weiman maintained a law practice on Allegheny Avenue in Port Richmond and also on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Center City. His specialty was family law. He chaired the Family Law Section of the Philadelphia Bar Association, and in 1980, was instrumental in enacting a new divorce code for Pennsylvania.
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