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Japanese Art

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NEWS
June 22, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Marjorie K. Sieger, a former educator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art whose field of expertise was Japanese art, died Saturday. She was 73 and lived in East Falls. Though a specialist in Japanese art, she was equally at ease lecturing and teaching Islamic, Indian, Southeast Asian and Chinese art. A museum spokesperson said, "As the museum's first coordinator of public programs for non-Western art, she enriched the lives of thousands of visitors with her great enthusiasm and knowledge of cultures throughout the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
If Vox Populi had been looking for the ideal pairing, it couldn't have done better than it has with its two current solo shows. Though Samantha Simpson and William Lohre work in very different modes (Simpson paints with airbrush on paper, and Lohre builds three-dimensional landscapes), both draw on aspects of Japanese art and the fable or gothic tale for their own diverse purposes. Those who grew up with electric train sets or any kind of miniature toy-worlds that could be realized on the living-room carpet will recognize something familiar in Lohre's art immediately.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marjorie K. Sieger, 73, of Brooklyn, N.Y., senior museum lecturer emeritus and former art educator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, died Saturday at Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn. Mrs. Sieger had been a resident of Brooklyn since May. She joined the Museum of Art as a part-time lecturer on Oriental art in 1965 and began working full time in 1971. After more than 25 years of service, she retired in 1991. As the museum's Oriental art educator, she lectured, offered art-history courses, trained museum guides and organized symposiums, lectures and other special events.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | By TOM COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Since history is big in Philadelphia this year, let it be properly noted that the Harvest Show - which will be held tomorrow and Sunday in Fairmount Park - is historic indeed. The first Harvest Show was held here in 1830, meaning the event is well past its 150th birthday and into the area where even the most crusty of Philadelphia dowagers might consider it "established. " It's also younger than springtime, or at least as young as the newly minted autumn, with a vast array of up-to-the-minute displays showing how to make things grow.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was growing up in Los Angeles in the 1930s, Yuriko Uyehara learned to drive the family car so that she could take her father, Naotaka, to a neighborhood where Japanese American fishing families lived. There, he collected shoes to take back to his cobbler's shop for repairs. By 1938, she had earned an associate's degree in accounting at Los Angeles City College. That normal life was lost when, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, she, her family, and other West Coast residents of Japanese heritage were imprisoned at the Rohwer Relocation Center near McGehee, Ark. Among her losses, Yuriko Uyehara could not practice the Japanese art of flower arranging, which she had happened upon in college.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
LAST GREAT WALL CRUMBLES AS CHINA GOES SHOPPING In yet another great leap forward, shopping by television arrives in China this very day. Two Beijing television channels will air the shopping programs - China's first. The programs will take viewers to various department stores. Phone numbers for the stores will be shown, and viewers can call in to order. Urban residents' disposable incomes have risen dramatically, but, unlike individuals in the West, the residents have few opportunities to buy high- priced items, such as cars or houses.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Felice Fischer, longtime curator of Japanese and east Asian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Rays, by the government of Japan. Ambassador Sumio Kusaka, consul general of Japan in New York, is scheduled to confer the distinction in an award ceremony to be held at the museum Tuesday. Fischer, who joined the Art Museum in 1972, is being honored for her "lifetime achievement," Kusaka said in a statement. "The Emperor of Japan honors Dr. Fischer as a recipient of an imperial decoration and one of the highest civilian honors in recognition of her lifetime achievement and commitment to excellence, particularly including significant contributions to mutual understanding and friendship between the United States and Japan," Kusaka said.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Americans who fought against the Japanese in World War II faced an enemy whose fanatic resolve in battle had been steeled by a warrior tradition more than eight centuries old. It was a tradition that stressed discipline, loyalty and willingness to sacrifice, qualities that made the Japanese soldier an implacable adversary. Most Americans probably did not realize then how deeply rooted in Japanese history this warrior tradition was - that in fact it had motivated the country's social and political system from the 12th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
Children's events are in full bloom throughout the area this first weekend in May. Tomorrow, Cherry Hill Township presents its second annual Children's Festival at historic Croft Farm. This year's festival, "Preserving Our Natural Treasures," features an afternoon of environmentally- themed activities. Highlights include traveling animal shows from the Philadelphia Zoo and the Academy of Natural Sciences, hands-on craft workshops sponsored by the Please Touch Museum (all participating youngsters should bring a paper bag)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HAILING FROM West Virginia, Jennifer Garner has probably been to a shotgun wedding at some point in her life. If not, there's always her own. According to multiple sources, E! confirms that the "Alias" star is expecting her first child. The father, we hope, is fiance Ben Affleck. Garner is allegedly three months pregnant. Neither actor would confirm the pregnancy, but then again, both denied their engagement when that was first reported. Before she starts showing too much, Jen will shoot the romantic drama "Catch and Release" in Vancouver.
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NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was growing up in Los Angeles in the 1930s, Yuriko Uyehara learned to drive the family car so that she could take her father, Naotaka, to a neighborhood where Japanese American fishing families lived. There, he collected shoes to take back to his cobbler's shop for repairs. By 1938, she had earned an associate's degree in accounting at Los Angeles City College. That normal life was lost when, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, she, her family, and other West Coast residents of Japanese heritage were imprisoned at the Rohwer Relocation Center near McGehee, Ark. Among her losses, Yuriko Uyehara could not practice the Japanese art of flower arranging, which she had happened upon in college.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Felice Fischer, longtime curator of Japanese and east Asian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has been awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Rays, by the government of Japan. Ambassador Sumio Kusaka, consul general of Japan in New York, is scheduled to confer the distinction in an award ceremony to be held at the museum Tuesday. Fischer, who joined the Art Museum in 1972, is being honored for her "lifetime achievement," Kusaka said in a statement. "The Emperor of Japan honors Dr. Fischer as a recipient of an imperial decoration and one of the highest civilian honors in recognition of her lifetime achievement and commitment to excellence, particularly including significant contributions to mutual understanding and friendship between the United States and Japan," Kusaka said.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
FAMILY Cherry Blossom Festival Warm one day, cold the next: At least the trees look like spring. In our city's 16th annual festival, white-and-pink blossoms inspire citywide displays of Japanese art, craft, dance, drumming, martial arts, cuisine and pop culture - plus a 5K. Various locations, through April 26, 215-790-3810, subarucherryblossom.org. Big Bugs Three enormous ants. One giant praying mantis. One huge dragonfly. One XL ladybug. Five more way-larger-than-life insects, all sculpted from natural materials by David Rogers, now inhabit Chestnut Hill's 92-acre arboretum, for your creepy-beautiful viewing pleasure.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
The moment you enter "Van Gogh Up Close" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the exhibition tells you that it's something special, one of those uncommon revelations of artistic soul that once seen, can never be forgotten. The trigger is a small painting of several sunflower heads, brilliant yellow against an azure background. Sunflowers are Vincent van Gogh's painterly signature, so why does this image, lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, make such a powerful impact? It even overshadows a much larger, and more typical, still life of sunflowers in a vase that hangs within arm's length.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
In Japan, the time around the blossoming of the country's ubiquitous cherry trees is sacred. Sakura, as this time is called, celebrates the ephemeral nature of spring. The cherry blossoms, a primordial pink, bloom and stay on the trees for such a short time, but are hallowed as indicators that life is being renewed after winter. During the 1860s, Philadelphians headed to Japan, whose doors had just opened to the West after feudal times, and they brought home cherry trees their hosts gave them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
Want to travel around the world but don't have the time or money? This weekend, the sounds, sights, tastes, arts and traditions of Japan are coming to you. Celebrate Japan!, cosponsored by the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia, the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Friends of the Japanese House and Garden (Shofuso), is scheduled Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. This family-friendly celebration will feature an introduction to taiko drumming, an aikido demonstration on the Japanese art of self-defense and sword techniques, and a traditional tea ceremony, or chanoyu, at 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. Also on the agenda are presentations on sushi preparation, flower arrangement, bonsai trees and calligraphy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer art critic
No little cat feet for art this season - it comes at us with a rush, beginning Saturday with the opening of a spacious annex to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. After that come exhibitions in Philadelphia for Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Charles Demuth and in Reading for Edgar Degas. In Wilmington, the fabled Bancroft collection of Pre-Raphaelite art returns to its home at the Delaware Art Museum on Sept. 23 after more than two years of traveling around the country. And in February, Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's agonized art arrives in Philadelphia.
LIVING
August 10, 2007 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
In the second half of the 19th century, Japan emerged from political isolation and began exhibiting its traditional arts and crafts at well-attended world's fairs in major European and American cities. The result was a greater appreciation for Japanese culture and a pop passion for its style - witness the success of Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta The Mikado in 1885. But even as fine arts such as painting and calligraphy were being celebrated, it was hard not to notice the artistry used in making everyday objects such as baskets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
If Vox Populi had been looking for the ideal pairing, it couldn't have done better than it has with its two current solo shows. Though Samantha Simpson and William Lohre work in very different modes (Simpson paints with airbrush on paper, and Lohre builds three-dimensional landscapes), both draw on aspects of Japanese art and the fable or gothic tale for their own diverse purposes. Those who grew up with electric train sets or any kind of miniature toy-worlds that could be realized on the living-room carpet will recognize something familiar in Lohre's art immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HAILING FROM West Virginia, Jennifer Garner has probably been to a shotgun wedding at some point in her life. If not, there's always her own. According to multiple sources, E! confirms that the "Alias" star is expecting her first child. The father, we hope, is fiance Ben Affleck. Garner is allegedly three months pregnant. Neither actor would confirm the pregnancy, but then again, both denied their engagement when that was first reported. Before she starts showing too much, Jen will shoot the romantic drama "Catch and Release" in Vancouver.
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