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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
Immerse yourself in the traditions of the Orient at the University of Pennsylvania Museum's Celebrate Japan - an afternoon of music, food and fashion designed to narrow the bridge between East and West. Masayo Ishigure, whose talents are featured on the Memoirs of a Geisha soundtrack, will perform on the koto, a traditional wooden string instrument. Various styles of Japanese drumming, known as taiko, will be performed by the Swarthmore Taiko, and visitors may attend an introduction to taiko drumming with a local instructor.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a time-honored tradition. Every morning, elementary school students greet their teachers in singsong unison: "Good morning, Miss So-and-So. " But this year, at Oak Valley Elementary School, classes are taking a different approach. "Ohayo gozaimasu sensei desu Kano!" say the students when instructor Yuka Kano walks into the room. "Arigato gozaimasu," she replies. For fourth, fifth and sixth graders at Oak Valley, it's a tale of East meets West this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012
THE ANNUAL Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival of Greater Philadelphia took place April 15 at the Horticulture Center. Attendees wore traditional Japanese kimono and Harajuku costumes. It was a treat to shoot these festivalgoers as they celebrated Japanese culture with songs, performances and fashion shows.     Contact Reuben Harley at BIGRUBE@streetgazing.com , follow him on twitter @BigRubeHarley or read his blog at streetgazing.com .
NEWS
January 6, 2016
DEPTFORD The Gloucester County community college student group behind the popular annual Japanese pop culture and tradition convention KotoriCon has endowed a perpetual scholarship. The $10,000 endowment from the Japanese Anime Guild was the first such gift from a student club at Rowan College at Gloucester County, formerly Gloucester County College. A ceremony was held Dec. 9 to sign the KotoriCon Endowment, which creates a perpetual scholarship to give one student a year $500 for books, fees, and tuition.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Brother Joseph Keenan had a fascination with Japanese culture and a love of Japanese food. He'd just carried some Japanese takeout into the kitchen of St. Mary's Hall on Boyer Street near Mount Pleasant in Mount Airy, where he lived with four other Christian Brothers, and was returning to his car just after 7 p.m. Saturday, when there was a grinding crash. A hit-and-run driver struck down the brother - a well-loved professor of theology at La Salle University - and dragged him 125 feet down the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Allison Caren and For the Daily News
AFTER GRADUATING from the Tyler School of Art in 2007, Aaron Mannino found himself at a standstill. He had a lot of time, a lot of experience and a lot of vision — but no outlet to express it.   He then realized he could try to combine what he loves with a place he loves: the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park. Mannino had first come to the house for a tea ceremony during college, and he eventually realized a lot of his artistic ideas were stemming from things he had picked up on while there.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Donald Richie, 88, an American expatriate who became a leading authority on Japanese film and culture, and whose many books explained Japan to the rest of the world, died Tuesday at a Tokyo hospital. The Japan Times reported his death, but the cause was not immediately known. He had a heart attack in 2003. Mr. Richie, who had lived in Japan almost continuously since 1947, was among the first Western writers to champion the artistry of such filmmakers as Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu. He wrote dozens of books about film and Japanese culture, as well as a highly regarded travel account, The Inland Sea (1971)
NEWS
October 12, 2012
THE JAPANESE tea ceremonies held at Shofuso House and Garden in Fairmount Park offer a brief but powerful immersion in Japanese culture. Known as "Chado" in Japanese, they date back several centuries. The ceremony is performed in a tatami room, named for the 15 mats on the floor. Every aspect of the ceremony - from the room's decor to the meticulous preparation to the cups, teapots and utensils - is infused with symbolism. "The tea host demonstrates the preparation of tea for a model guest who already knows when to bow and proper procedure," explained Kim Andrews, Shofuso's executive director.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Few instrumental combinations suggest so many alternative possibilities as the flute/viola/harp lineup that Debussy used in the series of sonatas that might have revolutionized chamber music had brain cancer not stopped him from finishing the cycle. As it is, his ever-intriguing Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp - in which the standard piano trio morphs into more delicate sounds with harp replacing piano, viola instead of cello, and flute standing in for violin - was the starting point of Dolce Suono Ensemble's final concert of its fifth season.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
If you can't find Brother Joseph Keenan teaching one of his religion classes at La Salle University next week, check the old Belfield cottage off Belfield Avenue and 20th Street. You'll most likely catch him sipping Japanese tea, eating Japanese sweets and saying things like "o temae chodai itashimasu - "thanks for the tea. " The cottage, which dates back to the 18th century, has been transformed over the past year from a tenant farmer's abode to a Japanese tea ceremony room and kitchen.
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NEWS
January 6, 2016
DEPTFORD The Gloucester County community college student group behind the popular annual Japanese pop culture and tradition convention KotoriCon has endowed a perpetual scholarship. The $10,000 endowment from the Japanese Anime Guild was the first such gift from a student club at Rowan College at Gloucester County, formerly Gloucester County College. A ceremony was held Dec. 9 to sign the KotoriCon Endowment, which creates a perpetual scholarship to give one student a year $500 for books, fees, and tuition.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Haddonfield resident Bill Brown arranged his first trans-Pacific expedition for students in 1977. On and off in the years since, hundreds of Philadelphia and South Jersey youngsters have spent two or three weeks with families in Japan - and hundreds of young Japanese have experienced American hospitality. "Certainly, Japanese culture is different," says Brown, 80, who has three children and three grandchildren. "But the family lifestyle is basically the same. " Promoting international understanding is a labor of love for the retired teacher, whose Haddonfield Japan Exchange brought 17 Kasukabe Girls Senior High School students to the borough July 27. The visitors, whose itinerary has included the Shore, the Cowtown Rodeo, and Cherry Hill Mall, are set to return to Kasukabe on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bugs and blossoms - it must be spring! Flowers first: More than a decade ago Adelaide Ferguson, cofounder of the Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival, stood in Fairmount Park pouring sake on the roots of a cherry tree. In the event's early years, the two-day "festival" featured a black-tie fund-raising dinner followed by this ritual, centered on the 1,600 trees given to the City of Philadelphia by the Japanese government in 1926. As Ferguson and dozens of others splashed alcohol on the budding trees, she looked around and said to herself: "This needs to be a lot more fun. " So she and Kazumi Teune, then newly appointed executive director of the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia, got to work, and 11 years later the festival has grown into an extravaganza that attracts upward of 20,000 visitors each year.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Donald Richie, 88, an American expatriate who became a leading authority on Japanese film and culture, and whose many books explained Japan to the rest of the world, died Tuesday at a Tokyo hospital. The Japan Times reported his death, but the cause was not immediately known. He had a heart attack in 2003. Mr. Richie, who had lived in Japan almost continuously since 1947, was among the first Western writers to champion the artistry of such filmmakers as Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu. He wrote dozens of books about film and Japanese culture, as well as a highly regarded travel account, The Inland Sea (1971)
NEWS
October 12, 2012
THE JAPANESE tea ceremonies held at Shofuso House and Garden in Fairmount Park offer a brief but powerful immersion in Japanese culture. Known as "Chado" in Japanese, they date back several centuries. The ceremony is performed in a tatami room, named for the 15 mats on the floor. Every aspect of the ceremony - from the room's decor to the meticulous preparation to the cups, teapots and utensils - is infused with symbolism. "The tea host demonstrates the preparation of tea for a model guest who already knows when to bow and proper procedure," explained Kim Andrews, Shofuso's executive director.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Larry Platt
After his government botched the response to last year's earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan appeared on television to announce his resignation. "Under the severe circumstances, I feel I've done everything I can do," he said. "Now I would like to see you choose someone respectable as a new prime minister. " Kan was the fifth Japanese prime minister to step down amid popular criticism in five years. In fact, at all levels of Japanese government, public officials humbly hang their heads and resign as a matter of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Allison Caren and For the Daily News
AFTER GRADUATING from the Tyler School of Art in 2007, Aaron Mannino found himself at a standstill. He had a lot of time, a lot of experience and a lot of vision — but no outlet to express it.   He then realized he could try to combine what he loves with a place he loves: the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park. Mannino had first come to the house for a tea ceremony during college, and he eventually realized a lot of his artistic ideas were stemming from things he had picked up on while there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012
THE ANNUAL Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival of Greater Philadelphia took place April 15 at the Horticulture Center. Attendees wore traditional Japanese kimono and Harajuku costumes. It was a treat to shoot these festivalgoers as they celebrated Japanese culture with songs, performances and fashion shows.     Contact Reuben Harley at BIGRUBE@streetgazing.com , follow him on twitter @BigRubeHarley or read his blog at streetgazing.com .
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few instrumental combinations suggest so many alternative possibilities as the flute/viola/harp lineup that Debussy used in the series of sonatas that might have revolutionized chamber music had brain cancer not stopped him from finishing the cycle. As it is, his ever-intriguing Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp - in which the standard piano trio morphs into more delicate sounds with harp replacing piano, viola instead of cello, and flute standing in for violin - was the starting point of Dolce Suono Ensemble's final concert of its fifth season.
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