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Japanese Soldiers

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NEWS
March 19, 1999 | By Lea Sitton Stanley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They put the babies in brown paper bags and then threw them away, stealing their lives as they had stolen the lives of their mothers. The infants were the children of sex slaves, and sex slaves had less value than the dirt into which the Japanese soldiers drove the stakes of their tents. "You Korean girls, we can kill you, as many as we want," Kim Yoon Shim remembers them saying. Kim, 68, was one of 100,000 to 200,000 young women and girls forced into sexual service by the Japanese military from 1932 to 1945.
LIVING
April 5, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At age 16, Mun Pil-gi was kidnapped from her village home in Korea and sent to Manchuria to sexually service Japanese troops. For a short while, a Japanese military doctor kept her from the soldiers. But she soon took her place among the other captives - in a cubicle where, each day, she endured dozens of officially sanctioned rapes. By the time World War II brought liberation, she was physically and emotionally debilitated. "I couldn't have babies," she told an interviewer, "because the Japanese ruined my body.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Kim Hak Soon, 74, the first South Korean woman to openly identify herself as a former sex slave of Japanese soldiers during World War II, died Tuesday in Seoul. In August 1991, she told in gruesome detail how during the war she was abducted and forced to carry ammunition for Japanese soldiers by day and serve as a prostitute at a military-run brothel by night. She was 17 at the time. Her testimony helped break an embarrassed silence and brought forth more former sex slaves, commonly known as "comfort women.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
AFTER THE Spanish-American War, U.S. soldiers were court-martialed for waterboarding Filipino guerrillas. After World War II, the Tokyo War Crimes Trial was held to prosecute Japanese soldiers for using waterboarding on American and Allied soldiers. In 1983, in Texas, a sheriff and three deputies were prosecuted by the Department of Justice for waterboarding prisoners. The deputies received four years in prison, the sheriff 10 years. On Feb. 14, ex-Vice President Dick Cheney advocated the waterboarding of two suspects.
NEWS
May 20, 2009 | By Leonard Boasberg
I was a Japanese-language military intelligence officer in World War II, trained to interrogate Japanese prisoners of war and translate captured documents. It never would have occurred to me to humiliate, let alone torture, captured Japanese soldiers. Nor did it occur to our military and political leaders to authorize "enhanced interrogation methods," to use the Bush administration's euphemism. In World War II, Japanese soldiers fought not only tenaciously, but fanatically, as we learned in Guadalcanal, Tarawa, the Philippines, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and elsewhere.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
During World War II, when American soldiers were fighting their way toward Japan, island by island, bloody battle by bloody battle, they skipped Rota. They fought on Guam to the south and Saipan to the north, but ignored this 3- by-10-mile coral blip in the Pacific Ocean even though Japanese soldiers were on it. That's pretty much been the story of the place - until recently. Now, remote Rota - with its virgin rain forests, limestone cliffs and pristine coral reefs - is the target of Japanese developers who want to spend $850 million to build resort hotels and golf courses over 13 percent of the island.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | BY CAL THOMAS
Those "heroes" and "heroines" of the '60s never saw a cause worth fighting for or a war worth winning. They have now delivered the final insult. As the anniversary of the end of World War II approaches, they are reaching back a generation and demeaning their parents' sacrifice, patriotism and decisiveness, saying there was no need and no excuse for dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Even The Washington Post was offended by a purely propagandistic program narrated by Peter Jennings on ABC. Reviewer Ken Ringle called it "an ingenue's stroll down the narrow tunnels of academic revisionism with only occasional intimations that larger truths may lie outside.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin L. Zapf, 82, of Yardley, a retired Burroughs Corp. executive and a World War II veteran whose B-29 crew members were the last U.S. airmen to be captured by the Japanese, died of cancer Dec. 21 at Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown. After graduating from Princeton High School in 1943, Mr. Zapf joined the Army Air Corps. He trained as a radioman on B-29s and was assigned to an air base in the South Pacific. On Aug. 8, 1945, his plane was hit while flying its 17th mission over Japan.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Japanese Emperor Akihito yesterday came close, but did not quite apologize to the Chinese for war crimes during the Japanese occupation, saying that he felt "deep sorrow" for their suffering then. "In the long history of relations between our two countries, there has been an unfortunate period during which my country inflicted enormous suffering on the people of China," Akihito said to President Yang Shangkun during a banquet in the Great Hall of the People. "For that, I feel deep sorrow.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Dave Urbanski, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
After a week of fighting and hiding in a Philippine jungle, a tired 19- year-old William Scaffidi looked down from a hilltop and saw the long line of Allied prisoners of war. He knew there was no chance of escaping alive. The U.S. Army radio operator buried his rifle, descended the hill and was met by bayonet-brandishing Japanese soldiers. They tore off his clothes and kicked him. He was thrown into the line, and he and his fellow prisoners began what would become known as the Bataan Death March.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days earlier, they were the hated enemy. Charles Breingan might have strafed the Japanese soldiers with the .50-caliber machine guns embedded in the wings of his P-51 Mustang fighter plane. He might have dropped 500-pound bombs on them. But at the end of World War II, after flying 15 combat missions with the famed Flying Tigers in China and news of the atomic bomb's use, Breingan was ordered to simply observe the Japanese withdrawal near Guangzhou, then known as Canton.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
THE LORD works in mysterious ways in "Flowers of War," the story of a scoundrel who shields Chinese hookers and orphans from invading Japanese in 1937 Nanking. The movie is a massive clash of content and tone, a strange hybrid of "City of Life and Death" and "Father Goose" that nevertheless, in the hands of Zhang Yimou, musters a few striking moments. "Flowers" stars Christian Bale as Miller, a wayward, expat Yank who's on a bender in Nanking when the Japanese invade. He stumbles into a convent where girls and prostitutes take refuge from marauding soldiers, and, in a stupor, impersonates a cleric in order to keep Japanese soldiers at bay. Miller is looking for money, booze, and maybe some private time with gorgeous pro Yu Mo (Ni Ni)
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  He was six years old then and doesn't remember that Dec. 7 in 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Marvin Baughman later saw newsreels with unflattering caricatures of the enemy. And he witnessed a B-25 bomber crash at a cemetery near the family farm in West Chester in 1944. Baughman never imagined that a decade after World War II, he'd be stationed at a former kamikaze base, renamed Johnson Air Base, in Japan, and that he'd get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Japanese side of the "date which will live in infamy.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Ginsburg, 91, of Wyncote, a real estate agent and developer who fought Japanese soldiers in hand-to-hand combat in the Aleutian Islands during World War II, died of complications from an infection Saturday, May 21, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Ginsburg grew up raising racing pigeons in Logan. He graduated from Central High School, where he was on the wrestling and soccer teams. He attended Temple University while working in his father Abraham's furniture store and residential real estate business in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
By Leonard Boasberg 'The American people don't want the American military to be used to advance a liberal political agenda, and House Republicans will stand on that principle," Rep. Mike Pence (R., Ind.) said before the House passed a bill repealing the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military. Only five Republicans voted for the bill, sponsored by Democratic Rep. Patrick Murphy of Bucks County. The Senate Armed Services Committee has approved similar legislation, with only one Republican, Susan Collins of Maine, voting yea. So what is this "liberal political agenda"?
NEWS
February 17, 2010
AFTER THE Spanish-American War, U.S. soldiers were court-martialed for waterboarding Filipino guerrillas. After World War II, the Tokyo War Crimes Trial was held to prosecute Japanese soldiers for using waterboarding on American and Allied soldiers. In 1983, in Texas, a sheriff and three deputies were prosecuted by the Department of Justice for waterboarding prisoners. The deputies received four years in prison, the sheriff 10 years. On Feb. 14, ex-Vice President Dick Cheney advocated the waterboarding of two suspects.
NEWS
May 20, 2009 | By Leonard Boasberg
I was a Japanese-language military intelligence officer in World War II, trained to interrogate Japanese prisoners of war and translate captured documents. It never would have occurred to me to humiliate, let alone torture, captured Japanese soldiers. Nor did it occur to our military and political leaders to authorize "enhanced interrogation methods," to use the Bush administration's euphemism. In World War II, Japanese soldiers fought not only tenaciously, but fanatically, as we learned in Guadalcanal, Tarawa, the Philippines, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and elsewhere.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin L. Zapf, 82, of Yardley, a retired Burroughs Corp. executive and a World War II veteran whose B-29 crew members were the last U.S. airmen to be captured by the Japanese, died of cancer Dec. 21 at Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown. After graduating from Princeton High School in 1943, Mr. Zapf joined the Army Air Corps. He trained as a radioman on B-29s and was assigned to an air base in the South Pacific. On Aug. 8, 1945, his plane was hit while flying its 17th mission over Japan.
SPORTS
November 9, 2006 | By Adam Rubin FOR THE INQUIRER
Ryan Howard sat on the floor, his legs folded uncomfortably, staring at a box of raw seafood. His teammate Chase Utley had no qualms downing the sea urchin in front of them, but the Phillies first baseman wasn't quite as eager. "He made all kind of faces," coach Ramon Henderson said. "It took him quite a bit to swallow it. That was funny watching him do that. " Said Howard: "I did try it, though. You have to give me that much. " Howard, who turns 27 in less than two weeks, truly went global this week.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | Csar Chelala
C?sar Chelala is an international public health consultant Japan's continuing refusal to reach an agreement with the former "comfort women" - women from conquered countries who were forced into sexual slavery to serve Japanese troops - has been sharply criticized by Amnesty International, which has called on the Japanese government to accept full responsibility. Of the estimated 80,000 to 200,000 comfort women, 80 to 90 percent were from Korea. Girls as young as 11 were forced to serve between five and 40 soldiers a day, and almost 100 soldiers daily on weekends.
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