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Jasper Johns

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NEWS
October 21, 1988 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
In his sketchbook, Jasper Johns, considered by many the pre-eminent American artist of his generation, once wrote what could be his credo: Take an object Do something to it. Do something else to it Do something else to it. Put this bit of information together with "Racing Thoughts" (far right) one of Johns' paintings on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting Sunday. There are dozens of images and symbols on this one canvas that are great fun to interpret.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
When abstract expressionism began to lose its momentum in the 1950s, Jasper Johns was one of the young Turks who offered a clear alternative to that aesthetic. Johns proposed a return to allusive imagery, but not to the narrational style that prevailed before the advent of the New York School. Johns was considered, erroneously, as a pop artist, but while he exploited popular symbols in his art, his goals were quite different from those of the pop artists. His art has always expressed his interest in perception, not in cultural values.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Four weeks ago, October began with the dedication of Claes Oldenburg's latest contribution to the city's outdoor art scene: the 51-foot-high paintbrush in Lenfest Plaza across from the new Broad Street entrance of the Convention Center that effectively helped reconfigure the center from an Arch Street structure to one fronting the Avenue of the Arts. November will bring an event focusing on another outdoor artwork by Oldenburg that reconfigured a public space: the Clothespin - specifically, the sale of a 4-foot-high model of it from the art collection of the late Jack Wolgin.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Philadelphia Museum of Art announced that it has acquired a recent painting by Jasper Johns, one of the most prominent artists in the world, in honor of the museum's 125th anniversary. The painting, Catenary (I Call to the Grave) was purchased from the artist with funds contributed by members of the museum's committee on modern and contemporary art, and by other donors. The abstraction, 6 1/2 feet high and nearly 10 feet wide, is one of nine paintings in a continuing series called "Bridge" that Johns began in 1997.
NEWS
June 20, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Venice Biennale, the oldest and most celebrated of the international art exhibitions, may not be as highly regarded critically as it once was, but it hasn't lost its allure as a premier event on the international art calendar. And this year, the 43d Biennale, which opens to the public Sunday, is a major event on the Philadelphia art calendar as well. The Biennale is organized by national pavilions, and this year, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is responsible for the exhibition that represents the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Edwards would make an inspired tour guide to the Jasper Johns exhibition, currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Jasper Johns, he would proclaim, as the expectant crowd pushed in around the artist's very personal, memory-encrusted canvases, this is your life! Here is Marcel Duchamp, your idol and inspiration for so many years! And here is your bathroom, so full of associations! And here is your dealer, Leo Castelli! And here is your studio - remember those flag paintings?
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
At 10 yesterday morning, hundreds of journalists and people with influence who were able to obtain red preview passes began to stream into the Venice Biennale for the first of three media-preview days. By noon, word had spread throughout the exhibition: The American pavilion was the show to see. Outside the pavilion, people were standing in line, waiting to be admitted to the Jasper Johns exhibition organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. By 2 o'clock, Mark Rosenthal, the museum curator who organized the show, was sitting on the pavilion steps trying to catch his breath in the semitropical humidity of a Venetian summer afternoon.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | MICHAEL S. WIRTZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Before a new show starts at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, much must be learned. Opening today will be "Jasper Johns: Process and Printmaking. " During training of museum guides, Caroline Cassells, a staff lecturer, talks about works called "Flags" and "Flags II. " The show has 125 proofs and prints.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
Veterans Stadium wasn't the only place in Philadelphia where people were standing in line for Johns yesterday. At the Museum of Art, painting aficionados welcomed the opening of "Jasper Johns: Work Since 1974," an exhibit of the American painter's work. Here, 5-year-old Alexander Reich of Philadelphia shares his thoughts on the art. The exhibit runs through Jan. 8.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
The newest jewel in the Philadelphia Museum of Art treasure trove is a 97-work collection that may tend toward minimalist tastes. But there's nothing bare-bones about its likely impact on the museum, its patrons, and the region's cultural landscape. Indeed, the decision by collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs to donate a substantial portion of their collection - whose acquisition poignantly represents a scrapbook of their 45-year marriage - requires a grand gesture in response. That came from museum officials this week with the renaming of the galleries of modern and contemporary art for the couple.
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NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Claire "Acey" Wolgin, 90, of Whitemarsh, a philanthropist and patron of the arts in Philadelphia and Florida, died Wednesday, Dec. 17, of respiratory failure at the Hill at Whitemarsh. Mrs. Wolgin was a longtime friend and supporter of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As cochair of the Friends of the Museum and a member of the Associates Program, both donor groups, she provided strong leadership for efforts to bolster the museum. In 1974, she was elected to serve as one of the first women trustees.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
The newest jewel in the Philadelphia Museum of Art treasure trove is a 97-work collection that may tend toward minimalist tastes. But there's nothing bare-bones about its likely impact on the museum, its patrons, and the region's cultural landscape. Indeed, the decision by collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs to donate a substantial portion of their collection - whose acquisition poignantly represents a scrapbook of their 45-year marriage - requires a grand gesture in response. That came from museum officials this week with the renaming of the galleries of modern and contemporary art for the couple.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Art collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs, who have amassed one of the finest collections of contemporary work in the country, will donate the vast majority of it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, transporting that institution into the front ranks of large museums with holdings of late-20th and early 21st-century art. Museum director Timothy Rub called the gift of 97 works, to be announced Friday, transformational and placed it among the three greatest...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
MANY GALLERIES stay open later on the first Friday of the month. Some schedule special events for second Fridays. Here's what's happening Friday night and throughout July at area art spaces. Bridgette Mayer Gallery. 709 Walnut St., 215-413-8893, bridgettemayergallery.com . "Line // Print," prints by modern and contemporary artists, including Jasper Johns. July 10-Aug. 24. Indigo Gallery. Crane Arts Building, 1400 N. American St., 215-765-1041, indigoarts.com . "East African Encounters: Contemporary Art from Kenya & Tanzania.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | Edie Newhall
Things have changed since 1961, when Jasper Johns made his Painting Bitten by a Man, an encaustic painting out of which he actually took a chomp, thereby embedding it with a vague eroticism (that Johns, a quiet gay man, kept the painting in his personal collection for many years before giving it to MoMA only added to its mystique). Now, a few decades down the road, another "Painting Bitten by a Man" — this time an exhibition at Vox Populi titled after the Johns painting — brings together the efforts of two artists, Brian Kokoska and Jonathan VanDyke, who seem happy to let their queer sensibilities permeate every aspect of their art.   I did not see VanDyke's presentation of his three-hour performance, Cordoned Area, on opening night, but have since walked around the large piece of canvas on Vox Populi's floor on which two male dancers cavorted with each other and paint, covering their clothing and the canvas (and part of the wall behind)
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Four weeks ago, October began with the dedication of Claes Oldenburg's latest contribution to the city's outdoor art scene: the 51-foot-high paintbrush in Lenfest Plaza across from the new Broad Street entrance of the Convention Center that effectively helped reconfigure the center from an Arch Street structure to one fronting the Avenue of the Arts. November will bring an event focusing on another outdoor artwork by Oldenburg that reconfigured a public space: the Clothespin - specifically, the sale of a 4-foot-high model of it from the art collection of the late Jack Wolgin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Things are a bit crazy backstage at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre. It's two hours before the curtain goes up for the first preview performance of director Anders Cato's staging of Red , John Logan's two-man biographical drama about abstract expressionist Mark Rothko. "We're working until the final moment," Cato says during a quick break. "But yes, I'm feeling good about the show. " The Philadelphia Theatre Company production runs through Nov. 13. Cato is confident his two stars, Stephen Rowe and Haley Joel Osment, will deliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
There can be little doubt that the Bruce Nauman show at the 53d Venice Biennale, closing today, will reverberate in significant ways for the artist, the Biennale, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which curated this selective career retrospective. The museum lined the outside of the U.S. Pavilion with multicolor Nauman neon words, giving the small Neoclassical building a beckoning presence on the Biennale's leafy grounds. It also expanded the show beyond the famed art fair into two other Venice venues - a possibly unprecedented strategy that led to unusual chance encounters with the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
If Philadelphia has lifted its famously charming veil of parochialism in any sustained way, it has been through two cultural exports: international touring by the Philadelphia Orchestra, and, for more than a century, stepping onto the art world's big stage at the Venice Biennale. No Philadelphians were represented at the first Biennale in 1895, but by the second international exposition in 1897, Philadelphia-born painter Julius L. Stewart started a long tradition of area artists and museums staking a claim for the city as a source of art ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Like a writer's second novel, the artist's second one-person show often catches its creator in an experimental mode. Anthony Campuzano's second exhibition at Fleisher/Ollman is no exception. He is still the antic, peripatetic artist whose colored-pencil and ink drawings of headline and ransom note-like sentences could almost be mistaken for the work of a self-taught visionary, but he has devoted a substantial portion of this show to a series called "Note on Door," nine large, vertical paintings on wood panels, all bearing the same message.
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