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SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
Overanalyze stormed down the home stretch to pull away and win the $1 million Arkansas Derby in Hot Springs by 41/4 lengths on Saturday. Overanalyze held off Frac Daddy and Carve to earn trainer Todd Pletcher his first win in the Kentucky Derby prep since back-to-back Arkansas Derbies in 2000 and '01. Prerace favorite War Academy pulled up on the back stretch but was able to walk off the Oaklawn Park track. The race's other favorite, Oxbow, never threatened. Blue Grass Stakes.
FOOD
October 6, 2011
Philly's cafe scene is already steaming hot. Now, the local roasting world has begun to pick up the pace, too, with two bright recent additions worth taking note of: ReAnimator Coffee and Green Street Roasting Co. Based in Fishtown, ReAnimator comes from self-taught roaster Mark Corpus and partner Mark Capriotti, who have been producing excellent micro-batches of single-origin beans, roasted lighter to highlight complexity - like...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sunbeams illuminated the brass cappuccino machine on a warm May afternoon while Maddlyn Zurawski brainstormed about how to attract the java-charged masses to her year-old establishment, Coffee Talk in Stone Harbor. Perched on an elegant brocade chair, the coffee vixen bounced ideas off customers. Caviar? Nah. Poetry reading? Maybe. Low-fat desserts and more entertainment? Definitely. Zurawski and her co-owner and boyfriend, Rich Gannon Jr., were vacationing in Colorado when they decided to open a coffeehouse at the Shore.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Merchantville is looking for a caffeine boost. So is Willingboro. Woodbury is eagerly awaiting the buzz, and Collingswood is ready for a second cup. Planners, developers and local officials in these towns are looking at coffeehouses as more than just a beverage trend. They are seeking out these businesses as a key component to elaborate visions for Main Streets, downtowns and town centers in South Jersey. "They're part of the social living-room fabric of downtowns," said Shawn Waldron, executive director of Main Street Merchantville in Camden County.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
To keep trouble from percolating, Philadelphia's prisons are going decaf. Starting in May, the coffee served to inmates and staff will be strictly decaffeinated - breakfast, lunch or dinner. "We hope it makes them less jumpy," said William Hightower, the prison system's food service director. "Caffeine makes certain people sort of hyper, gives them personality changes. " Hightower said the idea was brewed after Prisons Commissioner J. Patrick Gallagher suffered a heart attack last fall.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | By James P. Pinkerton
At a conference of high-tech leaders in Rancho Mirage, Calif., hosted by computer visionary George Gilder, the digerati elite seem to be mastering the universe. The hottest topic here is Java, software that exists not in the individual computer, but out on the Internet. The user downloads Java from the Net on an ad hoc basis to perform a certain task. Scott McNealy, chairman of Sun Microsystems, predicted that Java software would connect one's computer, automobile, job, even medical history, into a grand system of systems.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK 'Schindler of China' A Nazi loyalist has emerged as an unlikely hero of the Rape of Nanking in 1937-38, detailing in a newly discovered diary how he saved thousands of Chinese from Japanese invaders. John Rabe, a German businessman living at the time in China, recorded the terror of those two months of murder, rape and pillage, and his efforts to help the Chinese, in his 1,200-page journal, made public yesterday. Rabe died in Germany in 1950. Iris Chang, an American author who unearthed the diary while researching a book on the massacre, likened him to Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who protected Jews during World War II. "I refer to him as the Oskar Schindler of China," she said.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The Oaklawn Handicap Oaklawn Park, Race 8 - Post 5:14 $500,000 (Grade II), 4 y.o. & up, 1 1/8 miles 1. Cyber Secret. . . Robby Albarado. . . 5-1 2. Unstoppable U. . . Victor Lebron. . . 15-1 3. Sabercat. . . Ricardo Santana Jr.. . . 30-1 4. Atigun. . . Rafael Bejarano. . . 9-2 5. Alternation. . . Luis Quinonez. . . 9-2 6. Golden Ron. . . Ramon Vasquez. . . 20-1 7. Taptowne. . . Calvin Borel. . . 15-1 8. Win Willy. . . Clifton Berry. . . 15-1 9. Fort Larned.
NEWS
July 14, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the end of next month, drivers on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden may not be able to stop for that cup of java at all-night mini marts after 1 a.m. weekdays. And no one will be able to go to the Chinese takeouts on Federal Street after 3 in the morning for fried rice. Last night, Camden City Council unanimously approved legislation that would force eateries to close down an hour after midnight during weekdays and by 2 a.m. on weekends. If not vetoed by the city's state-appointed chief operating officer, Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., the restrictions will go into effect 20 days after being published.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
Overanalyze stormed down the home stretch to pull away and win the $1 million Arkansas Derby in Hot Springs by 41/4 lengths on Saturday. Overanalyze held off Frac Daddy and Carve to earn trainer Todd Pletcher his first win in the Kentucky Derby prep since back-to-back Arkansas Derbies in 2000 and '01. Prerace favorite War Academy pulled up on the back stretch but was able to walk off the Oaklawn Park track. The race's other favorite, Oxbow, never threatened. Blue Grass Stakes.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The Oaklawn Handicap Oaklawn Park, Race 8 - Post 5:14 $500,000 (Grade II), 4 y.o. & up, 1 1/8 miles 1. Cyber Secret. . . Robby Albarado. . . 5-1 2. Unstoppable U. . . Victor Lebron. . . 15-1 3. Sabercat. . . Ricardo Santana Jr.. . . 30-1 4. Atigun. . . Rafael Bejarano. . . 9-2 5. Alternation. . . Luis Quinonez. . . 9-2 6. Golden Ron. . . Ramon Vasquez. . . 20-1 7. Taptowne. . . Calvin Borel. . . 15-1 8. Win Willy. . . Clifton Berry. . . 15-1 9. Fort Larned.
FOOD
October 6, 2011
Philly's cafe scene is already steaming hot. Now, the local roasting world has begun to pick up the pace, too, with two bright recent additions worth taking note of: ReAnimator Coffee and Green Street Roasting Co. Based in Fishtown, ReAnimator comes from self-taught roaster Mark Corpus and partner Mark Capriotti, who have been producing excellent micro-batches of single-origin beans, roasted lighter to highlight complexity - like...
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - A Dutch court ordered the government Wednesday to compensate the widows of seven Javanese villagers who were summarily executed and a man shot and wounded in a notorious 1947 massacre during Indonesia's bloody battle for independence from colonial rule. The landmark ruling was the first time the Dutch government has been held responsible by a court for the massacre. The Hague Civil Court ruled it was "unreasonable" for the government to argue that the widows were not entitled to compensation because the statute of limitations had expired.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If most normal humans are made up of nearly 90 percent water, I am at the very least 80 percent coffee. Not only do I drink it from morning to night, loving the hot black spark perking through my body and mind, I've come to savor its myriad roasty flavors, the manual craft of brewing gear, and especially its culture of rituals - which can be oh-so-hard to change. Like most discerning Philadelphians, my ritual for more than a decade has been a cup of La Colombe, the city's "house brew," judging by the number of restaurants and cafes that have a pot of Corsica or shot of Nizza at the ready.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2010 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Critics say American businesses often pay too much attention to the next quarter's results. Even private companies can succumb, favoring short-term profits over long-term, sustainable growth. At Chariot Solutions, which led the small-company pack in the Top Workplaces 2010, management has tried to chart a different course. "We're not your average IT service firm," said Michael Rappaport, chief executive officer of the Fort Washington company. It is a distinction he plainly wears with pride.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Paul McCartney is doing more than the gardening, and is most sincerely not wasting away. Macca, as you might have heard, is 64. But as the cute Beatle inches closer to retirement age, he's behaving like a thoroughly modern guy. He's just made his solo material available digitally on iTunes for the first time, and rumor has it that an Apple-to-Apple agreement will soon find the Beatles catalog online as well. Sir Paul has also been talking up his new touchingly personal album, Memory Almost Full (MPL Communications . )
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Mum Puppettheatre's Fantoccini series (fantoccini is an Italian term for "puppet" used to describe brief, humorous shows put on between scenes) is known for expanding the definition of what exactly makes a puppet a puppet. So it is only fitting that in "Applehead," the first bit in Mum's new production The Fantoccini Brothers, puppeteer Genevieve Perrier sits center stage, fully visible, with both index fingers planted inside a pair of Granny Smith apples. In the same manner that Duchamp transformed the humble urinal into a work of art, this piece, written in 2001 by Corinna Burns, transforms common table fruit into finger puppets.
NEWS
February 25, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Owners of MilkBoy, the coffeehouse that has fueled Ardmore's revival with dual shots of caffeine and funky culture, will try a version of their cafe in Bryn Mawr. Paul Lichtman, Jamie Lokoff and Tommy Joyner will open a second MilkBoy Coffee on March 5, in the Bryn Mawr Film Institute building at 824 W. Lancaster Ave. The fledgling cafe will resemble its parent somewhat; both will offer live music most nights and attempt to draw patrons with a '60s-style coffeehouse atmosphere.
NEWS
July 14, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the end of next month, drivers on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden may not be able to stop for that cup of java at all-night mini marts after 1 a.m. weekdays. And no one will be able to go to the Chinese takeouts on Federal Street after 3 in the morning for fried rice. Last night, Camden City Council unanimously approved legislation that would force eateries to close down an hour after midnight during weekdays and by 2 a.m. on weekends. If not vetoed by the city's state-appointed chief operating officer, Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., the restrictions will go into effect 20 days after being published.
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