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Jayson Blair

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NEWS
May 15, 2003 | By Acel Moore
I don't write with either detachment or glee about the tragic story of Jayson Blair, the brash young reporter whose frauds have brought shame and embarrassment to the New York Times. All I can muster is sadness. What else can one feel when one sees the damage Blair has done, not only to his personal credibility but also to that of racial diversity policies across the nation? When the newspaper considered the best by almost everyone who reads newspapers - even by those who disagree with its editorial stances - has such a fall, and in these times of widespread public cynicism, it affects all newspapers.
NEWS
June 17, 2003
IT HAS COME to my attention that you published an article regarding the recent scandal surrounding New York Times correspondent Jayson Blair. The national debate on the issue of journalistic integrity associated with this case spurred thousands of Americans to express their contempt for this brand of yellow journalism. In this vein, it is noteworthy to call your attention to a similar incident involving another New York Times correspondent, Walter Duranty. Unlike the Blair incident, however, this scandal involves a renowned international reporter who aided and abetted a totalitarian dictator in covering up a genocide estimated to have killed 7 million to 10 million people.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | By ELMER SMITH
THE GLOATING is almost palpable. In one stroke, Jayson Blair did more to damage the New York Times, diversity programs and journalism in general than anything their enemies could conjure up. He could probably make a handsome living going from city to city as exhibit A in a long-running diatribe against liberal media and the "special preferences" they trumpet. And in this, as in everything he has set his grubby little hands to, Blair is grossly over-rated. So, I'd like to avoid kicking this guy while he's down.
NEWS
July 13, 2003 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local playwright and screenwriter Bruce Graham is one of 12 winners of the prestigious Humanitas prize, presented in Los Angeles on Friday. The prize, accompanied by a check of $10,000 to $25,000, is given annually to recognize outstanding writing for movies and television. Graham, who lives in Rose Valley, won in the Children's Live Action category, along with writing partner Marita Giovanni, for A Ring of Endless Night, a coming-of-age teleplay produced by the Disney Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Avid fiction readers are likely to experience a serious case of cross-media deja vu this fall, when a whole shelf of best-sellers rematerialize as Hollywood movies. In The Human Stain (Oct. 3), based on the Philip Roth novel, Anthony Hopkins and Nicole Kidman star as a college professor living a lie and his consoling, many-years-younger cleaning lady. Robert Benton directs the likely Oscar contender. In Under the Tuscan Sun (Sept. 26), Diane Lane plays a divorcee seeking solace in Chianti country.
NEWS
July 17, 2003 | By David Zhou
Plagiarism proved to be the undoing of Blair Hornstine, the Moorestown High School graduate who sued her school district rather share the title of valedictorian. The majority of media attention had focused on her unusual lawsuit, but Harvard University found Hornstine's lack of citation in guest columns for her local newspaper to be far more disquieting. According to the Harvard Crimson, the plagiarism spurred the university's decision to rescind Hornstine's admission to the class of 2007.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
IMAGINE a widget factory with a bad assembly-line worker. A person distinguished only by the imprecision of his work. Assume further that this employee has worked in the factory for four years, and that a recent review of his production revealed that just since October, he has generated 73 widgets, 36 of which were defective. Each widget was evaluated by a series of supervisors during production. And now, this breakdown has brought shame to the factory. Customers have lost confidence in the integrity of the product.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a typical news-media ambush: dozens of cameras and newspaper reporters staking out the sidewalk in front of a Times Square movie theater, waiting to pounce like cats around a fish store. But this time the prey inside were their own peers, the assembled staff and editors of the proud New York Times, and for the most part the last people those staffers wanted to talk to Wednesday were their media brethren. A scandal that broke when the Times last week acknowledged repeated outright fakery by reporter Jayson Blair has left Times staffers, their press colleagues and their readers anxious, angry and appalled - and given a measure of vindication or satisfaction to many Times and media critics.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Jane Eisner
Last year, the New York Times was showered with a record seven Pulitzer Prizes, fortifying its place on the Mount Olympus of journalism - a spot so close to the gods of our profession that we mere mortals were dizzy from the thought. The newspaper not only reported on the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks brilliantly, but it also helped a shattered nation heal with the simple, evocative "Portraits of Grief," a collaborative effort by Times reporters that was published daily for months.
NEWS
May 28, 2003 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
I know you're sick of him, but can you stand one more analysis of Jayson Blair? For those of you who have spent the last three weeks in a sensory deprivation tank: Blair is black, 27 years old, and was a reporter for the New York Times until it was discovered that he had lied and plagiarized his way through dozens of articles. Now he is the most reviled man in American journalism. Some critics have claimed that this is what you get from "diversity," that newspapers have been forced to lower their standards in order to hire unqualified blacks and other minorities.
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NEWS
February 12, 2015
DOES IT MATTER if Brian Williams ever returns to his anchor chair? Not to me. I'm not among the 26 percent of Americans watching network news daily. But his story is important - for what it tells us about ourselves, for what it means to journalism. On one level it's familiar: a person in a powerful position pulled down by his own faults; a case of obvious intelligence overridden by judgment gone AWOL. We see such stories regularly. It's just that this one involves someone at the pinnacle of a profession who's supposed to seek the truth yet, sadly, seems to have trouble knowing it when he sees it. The "NBC Nightly News" boss, who early in his career (1986-87)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007
WHEN YOU READ the following, consider the so-called "Bonnie and Clyde" couple: "Let's face it. Everyone cheats. You may think you don't, you may try to convince yourself that you're above reproach, but you're not. "It's part of the human condition to be a little bit sneaky, a wee bit opportunistic and just a tad shady. We all strive to be our best selves, but deep down in the darkest recesses of our souls, there's always a part of us that says, 'Try to get it done the easy way, and don't worry about stepping on that other guy!
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By ELMER SMITH
THEY WERE doing the monkey dance around the still-sizzling corpse of Dan Rather's career yesterday. It was like that scene from "The Wizard of Oz" where the apes leaped gleefully as the Wicked Witch of the West fizzled into oblivion. Between conservative talk-radio hosts and acid-penned bloggers, it was a confirmation ball for people who believe the major media are willing tools of the liberal establishment. Rather, who will be 73 soon, is in the stretch run of a mostly distinguished career.
NEWS
April 25, 2004 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Kelley dazzled his editors at USA Today with gems no other reporter could find, such as a trek to Osama bin Laden's terrorist camps, and a bullet-by-bullet account of an ambush in the Yugoslav mountains. But those stories proved wholly or substantially untrue, while others were lifted from other publications. And much like last year's Jayson Blair scandal at the New York Times, a leading newspaper found itself duped by a charming fabricator and information swindler. Last week, following the resignations of top editors at USA Today, journalists were asking what they should do to prevent such frauds and retain the public's trust.
NEWS
March 21, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jayson Blair has been on a media blitz to promote his memoirs, Burning Down My Masters' House, which details his notorious stint as a reporter with the New York Times, during which he fabricated at least three dozen stories. In the book, for which he reportedly received a six-figure advance, Blair says he's been forced to take hard look at his struggle with drug addiction and depression. But Blair's newfound candor isn't paying off. According to Nielsen BookScan figures, the book, which came out March 6 with a first printing of 250,000, has sold a dismal 1,400 copies.
NEWS
March 10, 2004 | Reviewed by James M. Naughton, For The Inquirer
Burning Down My Masters' House By Jayson Blair New Millennium Press. 298 pp. $24.95. In stores now. Jayson Blair's confession is incredible. That's no compliment. Blair's account of his brief but calamitous career at the New York Times really is hard to believe. "I lied and I lied - and then I lied some more," he begins. "I lied about where I had been, I lied about where I had found information, I lied about how I wrote the story. And these were no everyday little white lies - they were complete fantasies, embellished down to the tiniest detail.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chicago prosecutors Friday dropped seven of the 21 charges against R&B singer R. Kelly in a child-porn case. The seven counts, including charges of soliciting a minor to appear in child porn, stem from Kelly's June '02 arrest after a videotape surfaced that allegedly showed him having sex with an underage girl. "It's a matter of course in cases like this that we'd drop charges right before trial," said Jerry Lawrence, a spokesman for the Cook County State's Attorney's Office. Kelly's rep said the move to drop charges was "the first official acknowledgment of the weakness of their case.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | by Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The arrival of Master and Commander on Friday unofficially starts the holiday "prestige movie" season. Following are other highlights - class acts and not - from the pile of pics set to open by January, when the last of the Oscar hopefuls straggles into Philadelphia. Release dates are local and subject to change. Friday Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World See story at right. Looney Tunes: Back in Action Bugs, Daffy, Porky & Co. run amok with humans Brendan Fraser, Steve Martin and Jenna Elfman in this animation/live-action hybrid.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Avid fiction readers are likely to experience a serious case of cross-media deja vu this fall, when a whole shelf of best-sellers rematerialize as Hollywood movies. In The Human Stain (Oct. 3), based on the Philip Roth novel, Anthony Hopkins and Nicole Kidman star as a college professor living a lie and his consoling, many-years-younger cleaning lady. Robert Benton directs the likely Oscar contender. In Under the Tuscan Sun (Sept. 26), Diane Lane plays a divorcee seeking solace in Chianti country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2003 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IN THE world of journalism, an "exclusive" is a prized possession. It's the story you've got that no one else has got. The story that can make your career - unless, of course, you've made it up (see next item). Sometimes it's a story that everyone should care about - like Watergate. Other times, it's a story that no one should care about, but for some reason they do - like the Jennifer Lopez-Ben Affleck wedding to have been held this weekend in sunny California. As you may know by now, the wedding is reportedly off. Shocking, eh?
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