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NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Baird Parker, 61, of Lansdale, the sole surviving child of the jazz saxophone great Charlie "Bird" Parker, died Sunday, March 23, at Lansdale Hospital of kidney, liver, and respiratory failure. News of Mr. Parker's death was released by his attorney, Albert Oehrle. Mr. Parker's father died in 1955 at age 34 while in mid-career as a jazz soloist. He helped create bebop, characterized by quick tempos and improvisation. His mother, Chan Woods, a dancer, died in 1999 at age 74 in Champmotteux, France.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | BY CHRIS BARTON, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The cavernous dance club in downtown L.A. is hopping, and the weekend is still a day away. The club is ordinarily a hotbed of thumping house music, but tonight, the headliner - Houston-born jazz pianist and bandleader Robert Glasper - is switching things up. Behind a bank of keyboards, Glasper leads his quartet through a restless swirl of searching piano melody, causing the crowd to sway under the hazy colored lights. As the song gathers into focus, one musician begins repeating an unmistakable, 40-year-old refrain, his voice shaded by electronics: "A love supreme . . . A love supreme . . . " This introduction of John Coltrane (or at least the sounds he inspired)
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
STANLEY TURRENTINE, "Jazz in the Sanctuary. " Featuring the Clayton White Singers and Trudy Pitts & Mr. C with Lee Smith. Mother Bethel AME Church, 419 S. 6th St. Sunday, 7 p.m. Tickets: $20. Info: 215-893-9912. Stanley Turrentine remembers he was on a gig at Count Basie's club in New York City when the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed. James Earl Ray's bullet silenced an elegant voice, triggered urban riots and, says Turrentine, killed jazz in the black neighborhood.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Back in the 1930s and '40s, jazz was a popular source of entertainment. People flocked to large ballrooms to listen, dance and marvel at the skills of the musicians. But the presentation and packaging changed. Jazz became the exclusive province of the cerebral chic and cheap club owners. The music that best "reflects the American democratic idea," was banished to "dark, little, stinky clubs," says T.S. Monk, son of the late jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk. And T.S. Monk, a former funk and R&B drummer who now plays jazz, believes the only way for jazz to reconnect with Americans is to get it on television, not in the usual historical or cultural shows, but as pure entertainment - with lighting, staging, drama, excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's one of the top-selling jazz records of all time. Week in, week out, it sells more copies than many pop records - and it has for years. It is important because it brought together four of the greatest soloists of all time, as well as a top drummer and bassist, all of whom played at their peak on the record's six cuts, a couple of which have become jazz classics. It is Miles Davis' Kind of Blue, and on Aug. 17, the world of jazz will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of its recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1996 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jazz, as an influence on music of this century, has a history that resembles the business cycle. Its chart shows surges and relapses, highs and lows, but an insistent presence. Speculum Musicae played from those charts Monday in a one-nighter at the Settlement Music School when three of its members performed jazz-based music written in the last 50 years. Stravinsky and Bohuslav Martinu spoke for the mid-century surge of jazz-based music; composers Edward Jacobs, Richard Festinger and Jonathan Harvey stood up for jazz as a vehicle to carry music into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mellon Jazz Festival rolled on last night at the Academy of Music with performances by two of the biggest question marks in the series, Michael Franks and Stanley Clarke. Never mind that it appeared to be an odd-couple booking; there were those who wondered just what either of these guys was doing at a jazz festival. As it turned out, Franks and Clarke came prepared with the answer. Clarke, of course, is the bass virtuoso whose jazz roots cannot be denied. As a member of Chick Corea's Return to Forever group and later on his own, Clarke was a vital force in the forging of fusion jazz in the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1994 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
Jazz elements in non-jazz idioms keep a listener engaged, even when they lead to the most jarring dissonance and ambiguous tonality. I conclude this after attending a concert of contemporary classical compositions Friday at Temple University's Rock Hall. Parnassus, a virtuoso New York ensemble, presented four works, three of which received premieres. October by Temple professor Maurice Wright and Combo by Parnassus conductor Anthony Korf included at least a modicum of jazz elements (e.g.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
THE AT&T INTERNATIONAL WOMEN IN MUSIC FESTIVAL. 3 p.m. Sunday, Mann Center for Performing Arts, 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue in West Fairmount Park. Tickets: $20, $25 and $30. PhilaCharge: 215-878-7707. They solo with the finesse of a Jean-Luc Ponty, wail with the same wallop as the big bands of Buddy Rich and Woody Herman, yet get only a fraction of the respect. Such is the fate when you're young, gifted, and a woman, treading in the male-dominated world of jazz. This Sunday, the first (hopefully annual)
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
I'm sure when Peter J. McGuire first thought up the idea of Labor Day in the early 1880s, his motive was good -we should honor America's workers. But like the holidays set aside to honor veterans, presidents and Christopher Columbus, Labor Day has become simply another day off, a chance to earn some overtime or catch a sale. It marks the end of summer, the start of school and the celebration of jazz. OK, so I made the last one up. What the heck, jazz should get a day of recognition, and not just when some famous dead guy's birthday rolls around.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Few experiences rival a first night in a jazz joint - especially when you're still in high school and have no life. In 1987, I held my breath listening to the Divine One, Sarah Vaughan, perform at the Academy of Music, the velvet balcony seats digging into my shins. She represented the music of an older generation, but I was completely smitten with her naughty basso that then thrilled to the top of her crazy range. This woman has lived, I knew. Newly in love with jazz, I persuaded my senior-year beau to take me to Zanzibar Blue, when it was cooking hot music and dishes that Philadelphia hadn't ever tasted, like salt-'n'-pepper crème brûlée.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
Woody Allen's affinity for gypsy jazz is obvious to anyone who has seen - or just listened to - his films. The director has used Django Reinhardt's music on his sound tracks at least as far back as 1980's Stardust Memories , and his 1999 movie Sweet and Lowdown stars Sean Penn as a shiftless guitarist who both worships and envies the legendary guitarist. So it says something that when Allen wanted a distinctly French jazz guitar sound for his time-traveling 2011 Midnight in Paris , he turned to Stephane Wrembel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Jazz is typically associated with intimate nightclub settings, so playing outdoors on a larger stage to an audience that sprawls out over a block or more can be disconcerting. Not so for saxophonist Tia Fuller, who says she always makes it a point to get a crowd involved and excited, no matter its size. "From a physical standpoint, people might not be right out in front of you where you can reach out and grab them," says Fuller, who will play Saturday on Cecil B. Moore Avenue as part of the 10th annual Jazz on the Ave Music Festival.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Most summer Friday nights, the sliver of park between 49th and 50th on Baltimore Avenue fills with people. The attendees are of mixed age and race, and comfortably seated, because most bring folding chairs and blankets to hear jazz in the neighborhood. There has been jazz in West Philadelphia's Cedar Park for more than 10 years. It's a tradition that so reliably draws a crowd that a crop of vendors sprouts up along the outskirts, selling barbecue, hot dogs, water ice, and other seasonal favorites.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
Philly's Jason Fraticelli is one of those rare session men and local live players who hits all corners of the jazz spectrum with his ax - primarily the upright bass. Along with recording for brand-name nu-jazz lions Melody Gardot, Billy Martin, Robert Glasper, and Cyro Baptista, Fraticelli has tackled eerily elegant, self-penned jazz compositions such as "The Mothers' Suite," with his 10-piece Fresh Cut Orchestra (on 2015's From the Vine ), and worked out the jam-band-jazz with his Wet Dreams band (an eponymous 2009 EP)
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
WHEN PIANIST Sumi Tonooka headlines the 10th annual Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival on Saturday, it will mark her second time at the event, having been a special guest with guitarist Monette Sudler's band at the 2010 installment. But she was far from a stranger to the neighborhood even then; though she's called New York, Boston, and Seattle home over the years, Tonooka was born and raised in Powelton Village. "The festival is literally right down the street from where I grew up," Tonooka said last week, already in Philly and barraged with reminders of her old environs.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
On June 18, Home of the Sparrow hosted its 21st annual Jazz at Brushwood event. Home of the Sparrow works with women facing homelessness to secure housing, achieve long-term stability, and plan new paths for their future. The event, hosted by Elizabeth "Betty" Moran, was held on the scenic grounds of Brushwood Stables in Malvern. More than 528 supporters were in attendance and enjoyed cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, silent and live auctions, dinner, and dancing to City Rhythm. Welcome and remarks were given by CEO Patricia McLennan.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Leslie Odom Jr. has had a pretty good year and a half. Back in January 2015, the East Oak Lane actor and singer debuted as Aaron Burr in Hamilton , Lin-Manuel Miranda's megahit hip-hop Broadway musical and cultural phenomenon. "I'm the damn fool that shot him!" Odom-as-Burr sings eight times a week in the showstopping opening number, "Alexander Hamilton," at the Richard Rodgers Theatre, introducing Burr's fateful pas de deux with the play's titular "Ten Dollar Founding Father.
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