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Jazz Club

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NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
Fingering his golden saxophone with the familiar touch of a lover, Joe Fortunato looked fondly at the instrument, smiled to himself and looked around to the rest of the band. "How about a little bit of blues?" said the 58-year-old bandleader as the light over the bandstand brightened his thinning white hair. "Okay, B flat. A-one, a-two, a-one, two, three. " Mike Anthony, 50, a smiling, round-faced musician with a gravelly Louis Armstrong voice, kicked in on the drums, and Eddie Gaines, 68, who was filling in for regular jazz organist John DeFrancesco, chimed in on the Hammond B-3 organ.
NEWS
April 18, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zanzibar Blue, arguably the city's best-known jazz venue, plans to close April 29 after more than 10 years downstairs at the Bellevue at Broad and Walnut Streets. Robert Bynum, who owns Zanzibar Blue with his brother, Benjamin Jr., said yesterday that the lease was up and that although he was satisfied with the building and location, "we didn't think it was in our best interests to renew. We'd rather own [our] building than lease. " He said the new lease would have nearly doubled the rent, which he declined to disclose.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jazz I, the cafe and nightclub that opened on East Main Street about a month ago, serves no alcohol. But don't draw any conclusions about its owner from that. "Some people mistakenly think I'm in recovery when they hear we're non- alcoholic. But it's not even about that," said Theresa Keeys, 28. ". . . I wanted us to focus more on music and fine dining. "A lot of people come in here and order non-alcoholic wine, and they say they get a buzz. But I really think it's the atmosphere - the relaxation, the music.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teresa Heinz Kerry, wife of presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry, pleaded with African American ward leaders and Democratic heavyweights at a jazz club in the city last night: "My husband needs your help desperately. " "Not just on Tuesday," she told the crowd at Zanzibar Blue on Broad Street. "He needs your help to get things straightened out in this country. It's going to take all of us to do the job. " Before Heinz Kerry arrived, about 100 Democratic Party leaders ate dinner and cajoled one another into getting out the vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1991 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Some of the cultural amenities for which people live in cities are in short supply in Philadelphia. Oh, we have galleries and museums, a world-class orchestra and active pop- music and theater scenes. But this town could use a few more wide-screen movie palaces and at least a single big-name jazz club. Philadelphia also lacks even one of the intimate boites referred to in show-biz circles as "singers' rooms. " On that count, this year's Mellon PSFS Festival is a reminder of what we've been missing.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wilhelm Frederick "Billy" Krechmer, 92, a clarinetist whose name once was synonymous with jazz in Philadelphia, died yesterday of heart failure at Sunrise Assisted Living in Paoli. Born in Millville, Cumberland County, Mr. Krechmer had long resided in Longport, N.J. He also had lived in West Philadelphia. Mr. Krechmer recorded with Herb Gordon's band and toured with the Ted Lewis Orchestra during the big-band era, but in Philadelphia he was known for the jazz club he owned, operated, and served as band leader for nearly 30 years.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Main Street Manager James Flaherty looks at Ambler, he sees the Old City section of Philadelphia: jazz, art, theater, nightlife. At least, that's what he sees when he thinks about how things could be. Wishful thinking has driven Flaherty to consider how to bring the arts to Ambler, and how to spark a cultural renaissance centered in the now-closed Ambler Cabaret on East Butler Avenue. Flaherty and the Spirit of Ambler Committee - a group dedicated to revitalizing downtown - are talking about a project that will take the 15,000- square-foot Cabaret building and turn it into a complex containing such attractions as a 60- to 80-seat jazz club and an art gallery.
NEWS
June 26, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William C. Leslie, 78, of Sellersville, a saxophonist with the Louis Jordan Band and the founder of the Philadelphia Clef Club, died of a heart attack Saturday at Grand View Hospital in West Rockhill Township. Mr. Leslie, born and reared in Media, graduated from Media High School in 1941 and was an electrician's apprentice at the Philadelphia Naval Yard when World War II broke out. Mr. Leslie enlisted in the Army in 1943 and served stateside, in Fort Meade, Md., until being discharged in 1944 because of an eye injury.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
It's a lonely street, North Broad Street. Stores stare blankly into the night, their doors locked, the window gates drawn. The sidewalks are empty. There's plenty of free parking. And then there's Jewel's, a single-story wooden building two blocks north of Spring Garden Street, at 679 N. Broad St. Brightly-colored, handpainted signs blanket the door and window. Music pours onto the street. Jewel's is a jazz club and bar. Until now, top-name musicians played there on Fridays and Saturday nights, usually for a $10 ticket.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Three guesses: Hmmmmm. Ooooooo. That's right. UhHuh. Yeah. YEAH. YEAH!!!! We're where? Wrong. Naughty, naughty. This is a family newspaper. Give up? OK. These moans, groans and sweeps-off-the-feet took place the other night at a jazz show at Si! Ristorante, the newish Italian restaurant at 212 Walnut St., former home of the deceased City Bites. The visuals matched the sound effects. Yep, there were gyrations, vibrations and much shaking of all that shakes - all without leaving the chair.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall
Jazz trombonist Ernest Stuart had no idea that his fresh, dynamic project — one that he hoped would help rekindle the jazz scene in Philadelphia — would become the unlikely beneficiary of the demise of another jazz staple. But that's what happened. The West Oak Lane Jazz Festival, a popular fixture in Philadelphia for the last eight years, died just as Stuart's dream for an inaugural Center City Jazz Festival was becoming a reality. Such is the serendipitous nature of fate.
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What began as a quiet weekend took a violent turn yesterday as five people were killed, including the city's 101th homicide victim of the year, and at least eight others were shot in numerous assaults. Police said a 15-year-old boy was fatally shot in the chest and an 18-year-old man was seriously wounded in the chest shortly before 6 p.m. yesterday at Amber and Cambria Streets in the city's Frankford section. The two were taken to Temple University Hospital, where the 15-year-old was later pronounced dead and the 18-year-old was listed in critical condition.
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By Jeremiah Scalia
In Philadelphia, there is a historically African American neighborhood that stretches back well over a century. Its location is roughly south of South Street, west of Broad Street, east of 23d Street and north of Christian Street. It was there that, in 1953, a 16-year-old Wilt Chamberlain took his team from the Christian Street YMCA to victory in the National YMCA finals. Jazz legend Billie Holiday performed at the Royal, a jazz club there, and it is the birthplace of the legendary contralto Marian Anderson.
NEWS
April 18, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zanzibar Blue, arguably the city's best-known jazz venue, plans to close April 29 after more than 10 years downstairs at the Bellevue at Broad and Walnut Streets. Robert Bynum, who owns Zanzibar Blue with his brother, Benjamin Jr., said yesterday that the lease was up and that although he was satisfied with the building and location, "we didn't think it was in our best interests to renew. We'd rather own [our] building than lease. " He said the new lease would have nearly doubled the rent, which he declined to disclose.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2007
THE SMOOTH sounds and good eats at Zanzibar Blue (Broad & Walnut) will soon be heard and tasted no more, the jazz club/restaurant confirmed yesterday. Zanzibar chose not to renew its lease in that location, its spokeswoman, Melanie Johnson , told Daily News jazz writer Shaun Brady yesterday. She told Brady that the club will close April 29 and that it hopes to reopen elsewhere, but no plans are yet set. Its owners, Robert and Benjamin Bynum , brought the club to Broad Street in 1995, after five years in a smaller spot around 11th & Pine.
NEWS
April 14, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Sale: Deer Head Inn, storied Delaware Water Gap jazz club. Asking $549,000. Includes Civil War-era hotel, restaurant, one Steinway Model M grand piano featured in famous recordings. Care and feeding of musicians required. The breaking point for Chris Solliday came two days before Christmas. He was up on the mansard roof, tinkering with a box gutter. And then he wasn't. The 15-foot fall left his face black and blue, his shoulder fractured, and his resolve steeled. For two years, he'd casually asked customers and musicians if they were interested in buying an institution.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Just a Man Who Paints" is the title of Andrew Turner's current large exhibit at Widener University. And using that quote from the artist who was born in Chester in 1944 and grew up there in the 1950s and 1960s gives his latest show an invitingly relaxed and fortuitous air. There's a certain modesty in Turner's works, despite their obvious exuberance. A highlight of this show by the painter, who died in 2001, is that Sande Webster and Dr. William Dodd organized it, and they have included many paintings from private collections.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teresa Heinz Kerry, wife of presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry, pleaded with African American ward leaders and Democratic heavyweights at a jazz club in the city last night: "My husband needs your help desperately. " "Not just on Tuesday," she told the crowd at Zanzibar Blue on Broad Street. "He needs your help to get things straightened out in this country. It's going to take all of us to do the job. " Before Heinz Kerry arrived, about 100 Democratic Party leaders ate dinner and cajoled one another into getting out the vote.
NEWS
June 26, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William C. Leslie, 78, of Sellersville, a saxophonist with the Louis Jordan Band and the founder of the Philadelphia Clef Club, died of a heart attack Saturday at Grand View Hospital in West Rockhill Township. Mr. Leslie, born and reared in Media, graduated from Media High School in 1941 and was an electrician's apprentice at the Philadelphia Naval Yard when World War II broke out. Mr. Leslie enlisted in the Army in 1943 and served stateside, in Fort Meade, Md., until being discharged in 1944 because of an eye injury.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wilhelm Frederick "Billy" Krechmer, 92, a clarinetist whose name once was synonymous with jazz in Philadelphia, died yesterday of heart failure at Sunrise Assisted Living in Paoli. Born in Millville, Cumberland County, Mr. Krechmer had long resided in Longport, N.J. He also had lived in West Philadelphia. Mr. Krechmer recorded with Herb Gordon's band and toured with the Ted Lewis Orchestra during the big-band era, but in Philadelphia he was known for the jazz club he owned, operated, and served as band leader for nearly 30 years.
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