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NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It used to be that few in Philadelphia remembered Eddie Lang. Soon, it will be hard for anyone to forget him. In the latest tribute to the South Philadelphian known as the father of jazz guitar, his nephews, Ed and Tom Massaro, unveiled a historical marker yesterday that will soon be planted at Seventh and Clymer Streets in their uncle's honor. More than 50 people gathered on the breezy street corner in Bella Vista across from the Saloon as the Massaro brothers prepared to remove the dark blue cloth covering the marker from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
His nephews never forgot jazz guitar great Eddie Lang, but much of Philadelphia did, or seemed to. Until now. The Philadelphia Music Alliance announced its 1992 Walk of Fame inductees yesterday, and they included Lang, a friend and accompanist of Bing Crosby and a man who helped turn the guitar into a jazz instrument. Lang and the seven other honorees will be commemorated by a bronze plaque on the Walk of Fame, which stretches from Walnut to Pine Streets on the west side of Broad.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Mickey "Guitar" Baker, 87, a guitarist who forged a link between rhythm-and-blues and early rock music and whose 1956 recording of "Love Is Strange" with singer Sylvia Robinson became a pop classic brimming with Latin rhythms and flirtatious banter, died Nov. 27 at his home near Toulouse, France. The death, of undisclosed causes, was reported by the French publication L'Express. Mr. Baker's grounding in jazz guitar, coupled with his bluesy and at times distorted and aggressive sound, propelled him to the front rank of New York studio guitarists in the 1950s.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jef Lee Johnson, 54, a Philadelphia guitar virtuoso who played with musicians from McCoy Tyner to Aretha Franklin and Mariah Carey and who was renowned for his command of a variety of styles, died Monday, Jan. 28. He died at Roxborough Memorial Hospital, said his brother, James. The cause was complications from pneumonia and diabetes, according to his Belgium-based management company. "He was a soft-spoken genius that made every musician around him better," the Philadelphia trombonist and bandleader Jeff Bradshaw said.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
A JAZZ GUITAR leans against an armchair in a corner of Adam Schmidt's Old City office. "I don't play it nearly as much as I used to, which is actually why I brought it to the office," says Schmidt, 31. "At home, I don't find enough time to play. So I try to take a break and play every once in a while. " It's ironic, Schmidt admits: He has too much work at home, so he brings his personal life to the office. More often than not, the two worlds are one and the same for the young entrepreneur.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a chance for the so-called "Young Lions" to do what they do best last night, and for the most part, the took the chords and ran away with them. Those who did the running were mostly unknown jazz musicians from Philadelphia who concluded the Mellon Jazz Festival with a performance at the Community Education Center, 3500 Lancaster Ave. Sabir Mateen El (saxophone) and Attuta (vocals), Cornel Rochester (drummer) and Bobby Zankel (saxophone), Raymond King and the R.A.W. Trio, and last, but most important, jazz guitarist Monnette Sudler made up "The Young Lions.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
CHARLIE BYRD TRIO. New Market Cabaret Theater, 415 S. 2nd St., 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $15. Info: 215-627-9801. At age 73, guitarist Charlie Byrd's love for bossa nova is sustained simply by the songs themselves. "The tunes, especially the tunes by [Antonio Carlos] Jobim, came along at the time when rock 'n' roll and the resurgence of country music were making a big impact in this country," Byrd said by telephone from his home in Annapolis, Md. "There was a void in the kind of sophisticated material produced by American composers in the '20s and '30s.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When she first started getting out of breath, Monnette Sudler was still performing. She was still teaching, still recording. Now, time is growing short for the jazz woman once dubbed Philadelphia's "first lady of guitar. " She's on oxygen 24 hours a day. Her times playing with Archie Shepp, Cecil McBee, Grover Washington Jr., and Hugh Masakela are memories. Her performances are rare. It's tough just to get around, not to mention taking the "A" train. As for meeting expenses, although Sudler has some health insurance, she - like so many others - has learned how limited that can be when it comes to a catastrophic illness.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
JIMMY BRUNO AND JOE BECK. 9 and 11 p.m. tomorrow, J.J.'s Grotto, 21st and Chestnut streets. Cover: $10. Info and reservations: 215-988-9255. Philadelphians have a sad reputation for sometimes ignoring our own treasures. So when's the last time you visited the Liberty Bell? Dropped in on the Art Museum? Checked out one of those highly rated local restaurants that out-of-towners book up months in advance? Philadelphia musical treasure Jimmy Bruno is another case in point. This consummate jazz guitarist is booked this summer for jazz festivals from San Jose, Calif.
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NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When she first started getting out of breath, Monnette Sudler was still performing. She was still teaching, still recording. Now, time is growing short for the jazz woman once dubbed Philadelphia's "first lady of guitar. " She's on oxygen 24 hours a day. Her times playing with Archie Shepp, Cecil McBee, Grover Washington Jr., and Hugh Masakela are memories. Her performances are rare. It's tough just to get around, not to mention taking the "A" train. As for meeting expenses, although Sudler has some health insurance, she - like so many others - has learned how limited that can be when it comes to a catastrophic illness.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
A JAZZ GUITAR leans against an armchair in a corner of Adam Schmidt's Old City office. "I don't play it nearly as much as I used to, which is actually why I brought it to the office," says Schmidt, 31. "At home, I don't find enough time to play. So I try to take a break and play every once in a while. " It's ironic, Schmidt admits: He has too much work at home, so he brings his personal life to the office. More often than not, the two worlds are one and the same for the young entrepreneur.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jef Lee Johnson, 54, a Philadelphia guitar virtuoso who played with musicians from McCoy Tyner to Aretha Franklin and Mariah Carey and who was renowned for his command of a variety of styles, died Monday, Jan. 28. He died at Roxborough Memorial Hospital, said his brother, James. The cause was complications from pneumonia and diabetes, according to his Belgium-based management company. "He was a soft-spoken genius that made every musician around him better," the Philadelphia trombonist and bandleader Jeff Bradshaw said.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Mickey "Guitar" Baker, 87, a guitarist who forged a link between rhythm-and-blues and early rock music and whose 1956 recording of "Love Is Strange" with singer Sylvia Robinson became a pop classic brimming with Latin rhythms and flirtatious banter, died Nov. 27 at his home near Toulouse, France. The death, of undisclosed causes, was reported by the French publication L'Express. Mr. Baker's grounding in jazz guitar, coupled with his bluesy and at times distorted and aggressive sound, propelled him to the front rank of New York studio guitarists in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
From Django Reinhardt to Jimi Hendrix, the names that commonly appear on argument-starting lists of the greatest and most influential guitarists of the 20th century are familiar. But there's one flat-picking virtuoso from South Philadelphia typically left out of the conversation, whose music has receded into obscurity despite a trailblazing career cut short by his tragic death in 1933: Eddie Lang. That's an injustice an aggregation of local musicians and Lang enthusiasts are doing their best to redress, starting with a multi-act show that will bring Lang's music to life at Chris' Jazz Cafe in Center City on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2008 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
Most of the axemen taking the stage for the Chris' Jazz Cafe Guitar Festival over the next eight days don't have to make much of a commute. The club is a virtual second home for local stalwart Jimmy Bruno, who kicks things off Saturday. Frank DiBussolo and octogenarian Bucky Pizzarelli can carpool down from the Allentown area to continue their ongoing partnership this Sunday. And everyone else on the bill - Ryan Neitznick, Dave Manley, Craig Ebner and Mike Kennedy, and Steve Giordano - could take public transportation if the need arose.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
JIMMY BRUNO AND JOE BECK. 9 and 11 p.m. tomorrow, J.J.'s Grotto, 21st and Chestnut streets. Cover: $10. Info and reservations: 215-988-9255. Philadelphians have a sad reputation for sometimes ignoring our own treasures. So when's the last time you visited the Liberty Bell? Dropped in on the Art Museum? Checked out one of those highly rated local restaurants that out-of-towners book up months in advance? Philadelphia musical treasure Jimmy Bruno is another case in point. This consummate jazz guitarist is booked this summer for jazz festivals from San Jose, Calif.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
CHARLIE BYRD TRIO. New Market Cabaret Theater, 415 S. 2nd St., 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $15. Info: 215-627-9801. At age 73, guitarist Charlie Byrd's love for bossa nova is sustained simply by the songs themselves. "The tunes, especially the tunes by [Antonio Carlos] Jobim, came along at the time when rock 'n' roll and the resurgence of country music were making a big impact in this country," Byrd said by telephone from his home in Annapolis, Md. "There was a void in the kind of sophisticated material produced by American composers in the '20s and '30s.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
George Benson is the epitome of jazz/pop practitioners. When the guitarist hit it big in 1976 singing and picking on "This Masquerade," he startled the jazz intelligentsia - but also sold a mess of records. "This Masquerade" landed on the pop charts, the album, "Breezin'," went platinum, and Benson became a card-carrying member of the Cross Over Club (COC). Some excellent jazz folk have passed through the COC doors. Louis Armstrong ("Hello Dolly"), Ella Fitzgerald (the song books)
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