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Jazz Guitarist

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NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tal Farlow, 77, the cool-bop jazz guitarist known as much for his intellect and aversion to the spotlight as for his music, died Saturday night of esophageal cancer in New York. With his rapid, fluid playing style and melodic concepts descended from the ideas of bop greats Bud Powell, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, Mr. Farlow was considered among the most influential jazz artists of his time. By the late '50s, he had made several critically acclaimed recordings, both as a leader and with greats including Charles Mingus, Artie Shaw and Red Norvo.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pat Metheny is sitting in the midtown rehearsal space where he does most of his composing, describing the ordeal he goes through to write a melody. He looks beyond the grand piano, the array of synthesizers and computer gear, until his eyes land on a massive stack of papers nestled between water bottles on a makeshift desk. It's the galleys for his songbook, due out this month. This body of work - 500 pages of music written over 30 years - taunts him every time he sits down to write.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He plays in Broadway orchestra pits and New York recording studios, but for guitarist Ed Hamilton, nothing is as sweet as the Council Rock High School band room. "You are sitting in the best musical experience of my life," the 1983 Council Rock graduate told 50 high school students yesterday during an hour-long session of guitar riffs, musical instruction and career guidance. Hamilton, 30, is a jazz guitarist who has recorded two solo albums and plays in the pit band for the current Broadway revival of Annie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are those among us, savants whose opinions are correct 99 out of 100 times, who need reeducation on three counts. 1. Sorry, Virginia, there is no Santa Claus. 2. Unfortunately, there is such a beast as bad sex. 3. Sadly, there is such an animal as a mediocre Woody Allen movie. Sweet and Lowdown, alas, is middling Allen, a bubble of a movie that bursts too early. It is also that curiosity, a so-so film with transcendent acting. As Emmet Ray, a fictional '30s jazz guitarist, Sean Penn delivers yet another edgily entertaining performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010
11:30 tonight CHANNEL 12 Germantown's own Kevin Eubanks (right), jazz guitarist and former "Tonight" show bandleader, gets a plaque on the Avenue of the Arts tomorrow at noon. But first, he chats with Smiley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Byrd is a jazz guitarist. And Charlie Byrd is a classical guitarist. Byrd is obviously a rare musician - one who glides easily from one idiom to another. The idea of blending classical music with jazz, and even folk and rock, has been around a long time. And this, of course, is a prime ingredient in the "new age" music that has become so popular in certain quarters. However, Byrd approaches jazz and classical music with equal respect, and so he has never had much interest in attempting to fuse the two forms.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HIS PLAYING had been described as "ferocious," "salty" and a few other colorful adjectives. The object of these descriptions was the greatest jazz guitarist you never heard of: Jef Lee Johnson. However, if you're a dedicated jazz fan, you might have caught him at any number of music venues in Philly over the years, mostly playing in groups, with or behind other musicians, hidden but eloquent. You also might have heard his distinctive sound on numerous albums and solo discs, many of them starring other musicians.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Guitarist John Williams - schooled by his father and for a brief time by the legendary Andres Segovia - is one of England's most celebrated classical musicians. Yet he has always shied away from a conventional classical career. One recent day, he was eager to get out of his London flat to buy some music blessedly unconnected with the conservatory. It was a CD of Mali guitarist Bassekou Kouyate. For Williams, 65, the guitar has been a passport to collective guitar wisdom from Africa to the Americas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Of all the collective gestures made two years ago by popular music artists on behalf of social causes (Live-Aid, "We Are the World," Farm-Aid), none was fiercer, funkier or riskier than "Sun City," the hard-driving anthem in which "rockers and rappers" pledged they would never perform at that South Africa entertainment complex until that country renounced apartheid. Tonight's documentary, "The Making of 'Sun City' " (10 p.m. on Channel 12), captures much of what must have been an exhilarating process for all concerned.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Dennis Sandole, a jazz guitarist, composer and educator whose students included John Coltrane and Pat Martino, died Saturday at his home in Roxborough of congestive heart failure. He had turned 87 the day before. Although virtually unknown outside the community of musicians, Mr. Sandole (san-DOE-lee) left his fingerprints all over the jazz-history book. He played in the big bands of Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa and Boyd Raeburn. He recorded with trumpeter Art Farmer, saxophonist Charlie Barnet, and others, and put out only a few records of original material, among them a 1956 collaboration with his brother, Adolph, titled Modern Music From Philadelphia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
After a lengthy and hilarious discourse at his South Philadelphia home on all things swing and jazz, hot guitarist Marty Grosz, 85, says, "I hope I don't sound like a sour curmudgeon, which is probably what I am. " About to release his latest album, Diga Diga Doo - Marty Grosz Meets the Fat Babies: Hot Music from Chicago , the musician and singer says proudly that his art has always sought to entertain rather than lull audiences into a stupor...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Pianist Orrin Evans is all about the moment, the conversation within the music, rather than anything preordained or planned. "For me, the most important thing is the hang, and then the music," says Evans. This weekend, on what happens to be Evans' birthday, he'll share his delectable brand of improvisational chatter with members of his trio (bassist Essiet Essiet and drummer Mark Whitfield Jr.), as well as jazz guitarist and fellow Philadelphian Kurt Rosenwinkel. "Man, you don't even have to put the word milestone or birthday out there," Evans says with a laugh.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Pat Martino, eminent jazz guitarist, was at the height of a successful career in 1980 when he suffered a near-fatal aneurysm. In its wake came amnesia that left him unable to play the guitar. With the support of his family, he struggled with the aftermath. That struggle is one of many reasons Martino has such a strong connection with the local nonprofit Jazz Bridge. Martino headlines Jazz Bridge's 10th anniversary fund-raiser Friday night at Rosemont's New Leaf Club. For the last decade, Jazz Bridge, cofounded by singers Suzanne Cloud and Wendy Simon Sinkler, has offered health, legal, financial, and professional assistance to blues and jazz musicians in times of personal crisis.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jimmy Amadie, the renowned Philadelphia jazz pianist and music educator who recorded nine albums despite suffering from severe tendonitis that prevented him from performing live for 44 years, has died. He was 76. Mr. Amadie, who grew up in the Tioga section of North Philadelphia and lived in Bala Cynwyd, was diagnosed with lung cancer (though he never smoked) in 2007. He died on Tuesday at Penn Hospice in Center City. "Philadelphia has been the home base for some extremely significant jazz artists," said guitarist Pat Martino.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HIS PLAYING had been described as "ferocious," "salty" and a few other colorful adjectives. The object of these descriptions was the greatest jazz guitarist you never heard of: Jef Lee Johnson. However, if you're a dedicated jazz fan, you might have caught him at any number of music venues in Philly over the years, mostly playing in groups, with or behind other musicians, hidden but eloquent. You also might have heard his distinctive sound on numerous albums and solo discs, many of them starring other musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010
11:30 tonight CHANNEL 12 Germantown's own Kevin Eubanks (right), jazz guitarist and former "Tonight" show bandleader, gets a plaque on the Avenue of the Arts tomorrow at noon. But first, he chats with Smiley.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Guitarist John Williams - schooled by his father and for a brief time by the legendary Andres Segovia - is one of England's most celebrated classical musicians. Yet he has always shied away from a conventional classical career. One recent day, he was eager to get out of his London flat to buy some music blessedly unconnected with the conservatory. It was a CD of Mali guitarist Bassekou Kouyate. For Williams, 65, the guitar has been a passport to collective guitar wisdom from Africa to the Americas.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Dennis Sandole, a jazz guitarist, composer and educator whose students included John Coltrane and Pat Martino, died Saturday at his home in Roxborough of congestive heart failure. He had turned 87 the day before. Although virtually unknown outside the community of musicians, Mr. Sandole (san-DOE-lee) left his fingerprints all over the jazz-history book. He played in the big bands of Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa and Boyd Raeburn. He recorded with trumpeter Art Farmer, saxophonist Charlie Barnet, and others, and put out only a few records of original material, among them a 1956 collaboration with his brother, Adolph, titled Modern Music From Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pat Metheny is sitting in the midtown rehearsal space where he does most of his composing, describing the ordeal he goes through to write a melody. He looks beyond the grand piano, the array of synthesizers and computer gear, until his eyes land on a massive stack of papers nestled between water bottles on a makeshift desk. It's the galleys for his songbook, due out this month. This body of work - 500 pages of music written over 30 years - taunts him every time he sits down to write.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"I'll take your word for it," says Sean Penn, on the other end of the line, having just been told that his performance as Emmet Ray, the fictional '30s jazz guitarist - and irrepressible nutcase - at the center of Woody Allen's Sweet and Lowdown, is going to come as a big surprise to audiences. The death-row inmate of Dead Man Walking, the hard-nosed infantry sarge of The Thin Red Line, the sleazeball lawyer of Carlito's Way . . . there are any number of Sean Penns familiar to moviegoers as intense, raging and serious.
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