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Jeff Hartings

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SPORTS
October 5, 1995 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Hartings, Penn State's all-American guard, has absorbed his first loss in almost two years and still believes this can be another Rose Bowl season for the Nittany Lions. But that can only happen, the straight-talking senior suggested yesterday, if the coaching staff gets its act together. Really. What's more, Joe Paterno said on Tuesday there were some things that he, too, would have done differently against Wisconsin. Hartings said that he'd sensed panic during Saturday's 17-9 loss to Wisconsin, which ended State's 20-game winning streak.
SPORTS
July 25, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
The Detroit Lions are retooling their offensive line, and first-round pick Jeff Hartings, from Penn State, apparently could end up on the shelf. Hartings is in the midst of a holdout. Meanwhile, Lions chief operating officer Chuck Schmidt says the team has less than $600,000 left in its rookie salary pool, making it less and less likely that Hartings will be in the starting lineup for the season opener Sept. 1 in Minneapolis. "If he goes through this week and he's not here, we're starting to get ready for our first exhibition game next week," Detroit coach Wayne Fontes said.
SPORTS
September 28, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Detroit Lions yesterday signed guard Jeff Hartings, from Penn State. He was the NFL's last first-round draft choice to come to terms. Published reports said Hartings signed a five-year, $5.25 million contract. The deal reportedly includes a one-year option that would pay Hartings $1.7 million in 1997, the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit News said. Hartings' base salary of $577,000 this year reportedly will be reduced by nearly $136,000, representing the four games he has missed, the reports said.
SPORTS
March 9, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Defensive standouts Cortez Kennedy and Levon Kirkland are looking for work. Both veterans were cut yesterday after long, distinguished careers with their teams. The Seattle Seahawks released Kennedy, their eight-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle, two days before he was to receive a $2 million roster bonus. Seattle signed free agent John Randle last week after his release by Minnesota, and Randle will take Kennedy's place on the defensive line. Kennedy's salary was to count $7.3 million against the cap next season.
SPORTS
February 5, 2006 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, Ben Roethlisberger was a softy. Maybe he was timid. Maybe he was nervous. Maybe he was confused. Whatever the reason, early in his rookie season, Roethlisberger had a habit of quietly calling out plays in the Pittsburgh Steelers huddle. Sometimes he was fixated on his wristband that had all the Steelers' plays on it. Sometimes he was drowned out by crowd noise. Sometimes he simply muttered, forcing his teammates to read his lips as best they could. Roethlisberger's snap counts didn't come across much better.
SPORTS
January 20, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are several reasons why the New England Patriots have won two of the last three Super Bowls. You might have heard that the head coach is a genius, that the quarterback is the second coming of Joe Montana, and that the kicker is just about the best in the business. There's been more to the Patriots' success, though, than just Bill Belichick, Tom Brady and Adam Vinatieri. Tedy Bruschi, Ted Johnson, Willie McGinest and Mike Vrabel make up one of the best linebacking corps in football.
SPORTS
October 5, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeff Hartings is the conscience of the Penn State football team. He also is the team's best player, non-skill-position division. In the eyes of the professional scouts, Hartings, who plays what they call long guard in Happy Valley, might be the team's best player, period. And what he does requires great skill, even if it is allegedly a non-skill position. At season's end, Hartings and split end Bobby Engram almost certainly will be the 10th and 11th Penn Staters to repeat as first-team All-Americas.
SPORTS
September 21, 1994 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They amble toward the line of scrimmage, shoulder to shoulder, like a fleet of John Deere tractors, behemoths with ravenous appetites, testing the limits of their XXXL-size jerseys, and the fun begins. Cavernous holes are blown open. Defenders feel as if they've been trapped beneath an avalanche. And either Ki-Jana Carter or Mike Archie or Stephen Pitts or just about any other runner Joe Paterno has on the field finds himself galloping into the opponent's secondary. "When the guy you're blocking is fighting for his life to get free, when he's spinning around, doing 360s, well, that's when you know you've made a great play," said 6-foot-7, 298-pound tackle Keith Conlin, the biggest of the big boys who make up what is perhaps Penn State's best offensive line in a decade.
SPORTS
December 30, 1994 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The comment was bold and brassy, even though it was said with a nonchalant shrug rather than a sneer. And if it ends up plastered all over the locker- room walls of Penn State's Big Ten Conference opponents next season, well, Jeff Hartings is big and strong and talented enough to back it up. "I think a lot of people in the Big Ten have long felt that you should just go out and try to win the Big Ten because you're not going to go undefeated and...
SPORTS
April 21, 1996 | By Don McKee and Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Eddie George, John Mobley, Marvin Harrison, Jeff Hartings and Andre Johnson - all athletes with local connections - were selected in the first round of yesterday's NFL draft. Bobby Engram and Lance Johnstone went in the second round, and Aaron Beasley went off the board in the third, as did Terry Killens and Jon Witman. George, who was born in Philadelphia, grew up in Abington. He played two seasons for Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia before going to Ohio State. Last fall the senior running back won the Heisman Trophy - the first area player to do so since Nebraska's Mike Rozier in 1983 - and yesterday he was the first area athlete picked in the 1996 draft.
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SPORTS
February 5, 2006 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, Ben Roethlisberger was a softy. Maybe he was timid. Maybe he was nervous. Maybe he was confused. Whatever the reason, early in his rookie season, Roethlisberger had a habit of quietly calling out plays in the Pittsburgh Steelers huddle. Sometimes he was fixated on his wristband that had all the Steelers' plays on it. Sometimes he was drowned out by crowd noise. Sometimes he simply muttered, forcing his teammates to read his lips as best they could. Roethlisberger's snap counts didn't come across much better.
SPORTS
January 20, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are several reasons why the New England Patriots have won two of the last three Super Bowls. You might have heard that the head coach is a genius, that the quarterback is the second coming of Joe Montana, and that the kicker is just about the best in the business. There's been more to the Patriots' success, though, than just Bill Belichick, Tom Brady and Adam Vinatieri. Tedy Bruschi, Ted Johnson, Willie McGinest and Mike Vrabel make up one of the best linebacking corps in football.
SPORTS
March 9, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Defensive standouts Cortez Kennedy and Levon Kirkland are looking for work. Both veterans were cut yesterday after long, distinguished careers with their teams. The Seattle Seahawks released Kennedy, their eight-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle, two days before he was to receive a $2 million roster bonus. Seattle signed free agent John Randle last week after his release by Minnesota, and Randle will take Kennedy's place on the defensive line. Kennedy's salary was to count $7.3 million against the cap next season.
SPORTS
September 3, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story has been told by everyone from William Shakespeare to Walt Disney. It begins with a prince, young and carefree, but soon to bear the weight of great expectations. Sometimes the story ends in tragedy, sometimes in glory. But there is always a decisive moment: The prince rises to his destiny, or he falls short. That moment is now for Bobby Hoying. By comparison, young Hamlet did not have much on his mind. The question wasn't to be or not to be paid $5 million a year.
SPORTS
September 28, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Detroit Lions yesterday signed guard Jeff Hartings, from Penn State. He was the NFL's last first-round draft choice to come to terms. Published reports said Hartings signed a five-year, $5.25 million contract. The deal reportedly includes a one-year option that would pay Hartings $1.7 million in 1997, the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit News said. Hartings' base salary of $577,000 this year reportedly will be reduced by nearly $136,000, representing the four games he has missed, the reports said.
SPORTS
July 25, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
The Detroit Lions are retooling their offensive line, and first-round pick Jeff Hartings, from Penn State, apparently could end up on the shelf. Hartings is in the midst of a holdout. Meanwhile, Lions chief operating officer Chuck Schmidt says the team has less than $600,000 left in its rookie salary pool, making it less and less likely that Hartings will be in the starting lineup for the season opener Sept. 1 in Minneapolis. "If he goes through this week and he's not here, we're starting to get ready for our first exhibition game next week," Detroit coach Wayne Fontes said.
SPORTS
April 21, 1996 | By Don McKee and Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Eddie George, John Mobley, Marvin Harrison, Jeff Hartings and Andre Johnson - all athletes with local connections - were selected in the first round of yesterday's NFL draft. Bobby Engram and Lance Johnstone went in the second round, and Aaron Beasley went off the board in the third, as did Terry Killens and Jon Witman. George, who was born in Philadelphia, grew up in Abington. He played two seasons for Fork Union Military Academy in Virginia before going to Ohio State. Last fall the senior running back won the Heisman Trophy - the first area player to do so since Nebraska's Mike Rozier in 1983 - and yesterday he was the first area athlete picked in the 1996 draft.
SPORTS
October 5, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeff Hartings is the conscience of the Penn State football team. He also is the team's best player, non-skill-position division. In the eyes of the professional scouts, Hartings, who plays what they call long guard in Happy Valley, might be the team's best player, period. And what he does requires great skill, even if it is allegedly a non-skill position. At season's end, Hartings and split end Bobby Engram almost certainly will be the 10th and 11th Penn Staters to repeat as first-team All-Americas.
SPORTS
October 5, 1995 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Hartings, Penn State's all-American guard, has absorbed his first loss in almost two years and still believes this can be another Rose Bowl season for the Nittany Lions. But that can only happen, the straight-talking senior suggested yesterday, if the coaching staff gets its act together. Really. What's more, Joe Paterno said on Tuesday there were some things that he, too, would have done differently against Wisconsin. Hartings said that he'd sensed panic during Saturday's 17-9 loss to Wisconsin, which ended State's 20-game winning streak.
SPORTS
December 30, 1994 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The comment was bold and brassy, even though it was said with a nonchalant shrug rather than a sneer. And if it ends up plastered all over the locker- room walls of Penn State's Big Ten Conference opponents next season, well, Jeff Hartings is big and strong and talented enough to back it up. "I think a lot of people in the Big Ten have long felt that you should just go out and try to win the Big Ten because you're not going to go undefeated and...
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