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Jeff Hornacek

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May 8, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
While he's most remembered in these parts for being part of the 76ers' worst trade of the 1990s, Utah Jazz assistant coach Jeff Hornacek has emerged as a potential coach after two years as an assistant, not just in Philadelphia but in other places as well. Traded from Phoenix to Philadelphia along with Andrew Lang and Tim Perry on June 17, 1992 in exchange for Hall-of-Famer Charles Barkley, Hornacek, the shooting coach in Utah for three seasons before being promoted to an assistant's role, is one of the possible replacements for departed coach Doug Collins.
SPORTS
November 14, 1992 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Hornacek leaned over the press table before last night's game, borrowed a pen and wrote on his hand, "Look at rim. " Next week, he should lean over, borrow a pen and write, "Buy winning lottery ticket. " If this is all it takes, we've all got it made. "Sometimes I just start shooting instead of concentrating on a spot and going for that," Hornacek said. "I just wanted to remind myself to do that. " Sufficiently reminded, Hornacek lit up the Boston Celtics for a career-high 39 points as the Sixers blew into the Garden and won their first game of the season, 126-115.
SPORTS
December 21, 1994 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 76ers tried to open their arms to all the disappointed, discarded fans of other pro sports by mounting a spirited challenge against one of the hottest teams in the NBA. Then, however, they stepped into their private fourth-quarter twilight zone, squandering an 11-point lead with eight minutes to play and losing, 91-88, to the Utah Jazz before a disbelieving crowd of 10,225 at the Spectrum last night. It marked their sixth loss in seven games, all of them by six points or fewer.
SPORTS
October 17, 1993 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Katz says he doesn't negotiate with a gun pointed at his head. That's why he won't discuss a contract extension for guard Jeff Hornacek as long as Hornacek is a holdout. The 76ers' owner doesn't mind negotiating when the gun is in his hand, however. That's why the fragile Spectrum II deal totters in the balance as he threatens to pull out unless Spectacor and its nervous bankers make him happy. These two situations are not related, except that both are merely business, so none of the participants can claim higher moral ground.
SPORTS
December 22, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
John Stockton would have preferred to skip all the drama. "It doesn't seem like we should have gone through all that," Stockton said after he swished a three-point shot at the buzzer last night, lifting the visiting Utah Jazz past the Cleveland Cavaliers, 89-87. Stockton's shot deflated the crowd of 16,412, after Dan Majerle's three- pointer had put Cleveland ahead, 87-86, with 3.6 seconds left. The Jazz ended the Cavaliers' four-game winning streak and improved to 3-2 on a six-game road trip that ends tomorrow in Chicago.
SPORTS
January 25, 1993 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Hornacek doesn't look dangerous. Seriously now, how can he hurt you? He can't run very fast. He can't jump very high. His feet aren't that quick on defense. Look at this 76ers guard, a skinny, loose-limbed guy with a goofy jack-o'- lantern smile and a Boys' Life haircut, and stand him next to the gifted opponents he must play. What is this, a joke? No. It is no joke. Jeff Hornacek is a book with a cover so misleading that it takes time to fully realize just how good a basketball player the Sixers have gotten.
SPORTS
October 29, 1993 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Jeff Hornacek is angry and frustrated that the 76ers have not made a fresh offer to renegotiate his contract, an NBA source said yesterday. Hornacek, despite having four years remaining on his current contract, stayed out of training camp and did not join the team until Monday, the day before preseason game No. 6 in Charlotte. That was after a meeting in Florida Sunday with owner Harold Katz. Hornacek has said he resumed playing because Katz agreed to get something done before the Nov. 5 start of the season.
SPORTS
March 21, 1993 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as they took the spotlit floor at the Bradley Center to play the Milwaukee Bucks last night, the 76ers could not escape the shadow of their previous game. The night before was all still a jumble to them: game, bus ride, plane flight, bus ride, hotel, sleep. But in the cold Wisconsin morning, hundreds of miles from the Spectrum, the newspapers still said: "Dallas beats Sixers for first road win of the season. " It was really true. Oh, yes, the Dallas Mavericks - perhaps the worst team in the history of the NBA and a team that had entered the Spectrum on Friday night with an 0-29 road record - had beaten the Sixers, 89-87.
SPORTS
June 22, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Yes, Jeff Hornacek passed his 76ers' physical. Hornacek, one of the three players the Sixers obtained from Phoenix in last Wednesday's blockbuster trade for Charles Barkley, underwent the standard physical examination Saturday in Miami before leaving on an NBA-related eight- day cruise. The exam, conducted by Dr. Jack McPhilemy, the Sixers' orthopedic consultant, confirmed that Hornacek needs a "relatively minor" arthroscopic procedure on his left knee. Hornacek, who has had two previous procedures on the knee - one since entering the NBA in 1986 - has tentatively scheduled the scoping for July 1 in Phoenix.
SPORTS
March 23, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
After watching a 17-point lead over Denver dwindle, Utah's John Stockton woke himself and his teammates from their slumber. Stockton scored 12 of his 15 points in the fourth quarter and made two key assists to help the Jazz pull away from the visiting Nuggets, 103-91. Karl Malone led Utah with 23 points and 10 rebounds. "Adam (Keefe) made some nice cuts earlier in the quarter, and I missed him," said Stockton, who had three points and seven assists until the fourth quarter.
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January 4, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - For the 15th time in 31 games, coach Brett Brown threw out a different starting five last night when his team played the Phoenix Suns. Most of the shuffling has been due to injuries, but sometimes it's because of the opponent. Last night, it was a little bit of both. Luc Mbah a Moute returned to the starting lineup after missing the past two games with a strained left calf. He is Brown's steadiest player in a group that lacks many more. Also, Brown inserted rookie K.J. McDaniels in the starting five for only the second time this season, mainly because of the athleticism of the Suns.
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
While he's most remembered in these parts for being part of the 76ers' worst trade of the 1990s, Utah Jazz assistant coach Jeff Hornacek has emerged as a potential coach after two years as an assistant, not just in Philadelphia but in other places as well. Traded from Phoenix to Philadelphia along with Andrew Lang and Tim Perry on June 17, 1992 in exchange for Hall-of-Famer Charles Barkley, Hornacek, the shooting coach in Utah for three seasons before being promoted to an assistant's role, is one of the possible replacements for departed coach Doug Collins.
SPORTS
May 12, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
The Portland Trail Blazers, solid at every position, are solidly in control of the Utah Jazz. Arvydas Sabonis scored 22 points and Steve Smith had 21 as the visiting Trail Blazers beat the Jazz, 103-84, last night for a 3-0 lead in the Western Conference semifinals. Bonzi Wells scored 10 of his 19 points in the fourth quarter to help the Blazers hold off a second-half Utah surge, leaving the Jazz one game from being swept in a best-of-seven series for the first time in franchise history.
SPORTS
June 8, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
How do you tell the Utah Jazz in any of the 41 languages in which the NBA Finals are being broadcast that they still have a chance? You don't. Mathematically, the suddenly staggering Jazz has two chances - slim and none? - to take the best-of-seven series back to Salt Lake City. Down 2-1 after getting publicly embarrassed, 96-54, last night, the Western champions have two days before Wednesday night's Game 4 to sit and wonder exactly how they can hope to do that. "If we do this for two more games, that will be a very good thing," said Bulls forward Toni Kukoc, who scored 16 points.
SPORTS
June 7, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has been in the league for 13 years. His 6-foot-9 frame is embellished by a chiseled 256 pounds. And at this time last year, Karl Malone was a few days removed from hoisting the NBA's most valuable player award. Fast forward to today, and it all seems like a cruel joke. Especially after what transpired in the Chicago Bulls' 93-88 win Friday night in Game 2 of the NBA Finals. Despite nailing two pivotal jumpers near the end of regulation to key Utah's win in Game 1 on Tuesday, Malone played a pathetic game that night, shooting 9 for 25 and acting as if he were allergic to driving to the basket.
SPORTS
June 5, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One player has been in the league for two years and is still wet behind the ears. Another is a 270-pound savvy veteran known more for his eye shades than his play. Their reserve point guard defines the term "timid," and his 280-pound teammate was nothing more than an afterthought until he was slapped to the ground by Lakers center Shaquille O'Neal. Considering that the Utah Jazz are playing in their second consecutive NBA Finals, the names of Shandon Anderson, Antoine Carr, Howard Eisley and Greg Ostertag should probably be as familiar to NBA fans as the contours of their favorite easy chair.
SPORTS
June 4, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Look 'em up: John Stockton is 36, Jeff Hornacek is 35, Karl Malone is 34. But the only thing getting old for the Utah Jazz was waiting to play. When it was time, the geezers ruled in an 88-85 overtime victory last night over the defending champion Chicago Bulls in Game 1 of the NBA Finals. This was no time for Stockton to show his age, unless the age factor meant he was smart enough, experienced enough and tough enough to drop in an excruciating runner with 9.3 seconds left to give the Jazz an 86-82 lead.
SPORTS
May 19, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If a picture is worth a thousand words, the scene inside the Los Angeles locker room after the Lakers' loss to the Utah Jazz last night spoke volumes. Kobe Bryant, the Lakers' eloquent 19-year-old orator, stood silent, head bowed. Rick Fox sat on a bathroom counter, head turned toward the ceiling, eyes closed. Teammates gathered around them, searching for ways to explain the Lakers' 99-95 loss to the Jazz in Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, a loss that put them down by two games to none.
SPORTS
January 7, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the 76ers come home with their heads held high, welcome them. With open arms. A team that skipped out of a town disgusted with its play will return with a huge degree of respectability despite losing a 98-95 thriller to the Utah Jazz in overtime last night at the Delta Center. Allen Iverson had a game high of 27 points and drilled a three-pointer with 2.8 seconds left that sent the game into overtime. That forced the Jazz to await a three-point miss by Derrick Coleman with 1.3 seconds left in the extra session before walking away with the win. Down by 92-91, the Sixers stayed in contention, taking a 93-92 lead with two free throws from Clarence Weatherspoon.
SPORTS
June 7, 1997 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The subject all along had been the palm of his hand, all about the ugly blister that seemingly had limited his effectiveness. Last night, it was about holding the Chicago Bulls in the palm of that very same hand. Karl Malone rumbled through the Delta Center like one of the 16-wheelers he cherishes. The paint was his highway. He made up the rules of the road as he went along. This was a road map back into the fray. With the Mailman scoring 37 points, taking 10 rebounds and making four steals, the Utah Jazz turned back the Chicago Bulls, 104-93, reducing its deficit in the best-of-seven NBA Finals to 2-1. "When I'm more active defensively, my scoring usually is better," said Malone, who had hit only 16 of 42 shots in the first two games in Chicago.
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