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Jeff Wall

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NEWS
April 3, 2007 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The camera can either reproduce reality by freezing an instant in time - the purist definition - or it can create it through manipulation and artifice. Although photographers began to invent and imagine at least a century ago, this approach has proliferated during the postmodern period. Since the mid-1970s, Canadian artist Jeff Wall has been one of the most prominent "stage-managing" photographers. Like Cindy Sherman, Wall has invested his scenarios with the look and sensibility of film stills.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David N. Pincus, the Philadelphia clothing manufacturer and philanthropist, joked a few years ago about the soaring value of the art that he and his wife, Geraldine, had collected over the years. "You know, I bought and sold things for some wild numbers," said Pincus, who died in December at age 85. Wild, indeed. An auction of some of the Pincus collection last week at Christie's in New York fetched $180 million. A 1961 painting by Mark Rothko sold for $77.5 million to an anonymous bidder — nearly $87 million with the buyer's commission, a record for a postwar work, Christie's says.About 50 bids were cast in the six-minute auction Tuesday night for the work titled Orange, Red, Yellow.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Seeing Tina Barney's lush color portraits of the affluent in magazines and monographs of her work is one thing; experiencing them in person is another. Gallery 339 has mounted a mini-survey of this photographer's oeuvre from the last 17 years that not only proves that her art has stood the test of time, but that her photographs are best experienced face-to-face to be fully appreciated. Barney's prints, though much smaller than those of Jeff Wall or Andreas Gursky, contain a similar bounty of pointedly mundane detail, which always arouses our detective instinct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jimi Gleason, a California artist, has come up with two new wrinkles in color-field painting: layering and glitter. One thinks of color-field as involving thin washes of color, sometimes applied to raw canvas, but Gleason's paintings at Works on Paper gallery push the technique in the opposite direction. Gleason applies multiple layers of acrylic pigment with a flat tool, not a brush, sanding between applications. The layering is evident at the edges of the canvas, where it resembles the delamination of weathered plywood.
SPORTS
May 22, 1987 | By Kevin Tatum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before he went to the plate in the seventh inning of his team's contest against Cherry Hill West yesterday, Bishop Eustace catcher Jeff Wall had a brief conference with coach Joe Galliera. "I told Jeff he was going to win the game for us," Galliera said of the meeting, which took place with the score tied, one out and a runner on first. Galliera proved prophetic. Wall slammed a home run to left field off losing pitcher Lenny Viccharelli (3-1), and the Crusaders went on to register a 9-4 victory in the Olympic Conference interdivisional game at West.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
I wish Canada were as aesthetically picturesque as Mexico. It is, actually, but artists and photographers never seem to travel there. Instead, they go south. Mexico's attraction for them is obvious. It's more archaeological, ethnological, mystical and tragic than Canada. It has revolutions, Day of the Dead, and Frida Kahlo. That's why exhibitions with Mexican themes keep popping up in museums, while Canada, the Rodney Dangerfield of nations, rarely merits a mention. "Eye on Mexico" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is the latest such paean to our Hispanic neighbor.
SPORTS
November 8, 1987 | By Lou Misselhorn, Special to The Inquirer
Bishop Eustace coach Clyde Folsom was especially worried before yesterday's game. He said his team's practices were sluggish during the week following a loss to Woodrow Wilson. And yesterday, the Crusaders had to play at Deptford. "We didn't respond very well in practices," Folsom said. "We were very concerned. " But the week-long look of concern turned into a big Saturday afternoon smile. That's because Eustace, ranked No. 8 in The Inquirer's South Jersey Top 10, thoroughly outplayed Deptford, crushing the Spartans, 26-0 in an Olympic Conference Patriot Division game.
SPORTS
November 25, 1988 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsauken did not qualify for the NJSIAA South Jersey playoffs this fall. So yesterday, the Indians did the next best thing. They beat a team that has already won in the playoffs. Pennsauken used stout defense to upset previously unbeaten Bishop Eustace, 7-6. A standing-room-only crowd of 3,500 watched the game at Pennsauken. The Indians, ranked No. 9 in South Jersey by The Inquirer, finished their season 7-2. Bishop Eustace, which had won its third consecutive South Jersey Parochial B championship a week ago, finished 9-1. The Crusaders are ranked No. 3 by The Inquirer.
NEWS
May 7, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's just say, it didn't hurt that the two paintings at the start of the Museum of Art's blockbuster exhibition were of guys in their swim trunks, and the people on the audio guide jumped in talking about homosexuality and nipples. "Cezanne and Beyond," I salute you. You totally got the attention of my children. I could almost see the oxygen flooding to the brain of my sixth grader, who pointed out the nipple weirdness of Cezanne's The Bather moments before the guides in her ears did. And I could see the eighth grader punching the numbers into the audio set when moments before she had vowed not to. Hey, maybe Mom is taking us to something interesting this time?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Temple Gallery has been going out of its way - literally - to introduce artists it considers deserving of attention. Its latest exhibition marks the first U.S. appearance for conceptual artist Damian Moppett, whose drawings, paintings and sculptures have been seen mainly in his native Vancouver. Moppett has been influenced by such well-known Vancouver exports as photographer Jeff Wall, installation artist Stan Douglas, and video artist and photographer Roy Arden. Like theirs, his work refers to popular culture, institutions, and his own art-school education, and, like them, he keeps his practice informal and open to possibility.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David N. Pincus, the Philadelphia clothing manufacturer and philanthropist, joked a few years ago about the soaring value of the art that he and his wife, Geraldine, had collected over the years. "You know, I bought and sold things for some wild numbers," said Pincus, who died in December at age 85. Wild, indeed. An auction of some of the Pincus collection last week at Christie's in New York fetched $180 million. A 1961 painting by Mark Rothko sold for $77.5 million to an anonymous bidder — nearly $87 million with the buyer's commission, a record for a postwar work, Christie's says.About 50 bids were cast in the six-minute auction Tuesday night for the work titled Orange, Red, Yellow.
NEWS
May 7, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's just say, it didn't hurt that the two paintings at the start of the Museum of Art's blockbuster exhibition were of guys in their swim trunks, and the people on the audio guide jumped in talking about homosexuality and nipples. "Cezanne and Beyond," I salute you. You totally got the attention of my children. I could almost see the oxygen flooding to the brain of my sixth grader, who pointed out the nipple weirdness of Cezanne's The Bather moments before the guides in her ears did. And I could see the eighth grader punching the numbers into the audio set when moments before she had vowed not to. Hey, maybe Mom is taking us to something interesting this time?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Temple Gallery has been going out of its way - literally - to introduce artists it considers deserving of attention. Its latest exhibition marks the first U.S. appearance for conceptual artist Damian Moppett, whose drawings, paintings and sculptures have been seen mainly in his native Vancouver. Moppett has been influenced by such well-known Vancouver exports as photographer Jeff Wall, installation artist Stan Douglas, and video artist and photographer Roy Arden. Like theirs, his work refers to popular culture, institutions, and his own art-school education, and, like them, he keeps his practice informal and open to possibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Seeing Tina Barney's lush color portraits of the affluent in magazines and monographs of her work is one thing; experiencing them in person is another. Gallery 339 has mounted a mini-survey of this photographer's oeuvre from the last 17 years that not only proves that her art has stood the test of time, but that her photographs are best experienced face-to-face to be fully appreciated. Barney's prints, though much smaller than those of Jeff Wall or Andreas Gursky, contain a similar bounty of pointedly mundane detail, which always arouses our detective instinct.
NEWS
April 3, 2007 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The camera can either reproduce reality by freezing an instant in time - the purist definition - or it can create it through manipulation and artifice. Although photographers began to invent and imagine at least a century ago, this approach has proliferated during the postmodern period. Since the mid-1970s, Canadian artist Jeff Wall has been one of the most prominent "stage-managing" photographers. Like Cindy Sherman, Wall has invested his scenarios with the look and sensibility of film stills.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jimi Gleason, a California artist, has come up with two new wrinkles in color-field painting: layering and glitter. One thinks of color-field as involving thin washes of color, sometimes applied to raw canvas, but Gleason's paintings at Works on Paper gallery push the technique in the opposite direction. Gleason applies multiple layers of acrylic pigment with a flat tool, not a brush, sanding between applications. The layering is evident at the edges of the canvas, where it resembles the delamination of weathered plywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
I wish Canada were as aesthetically picturesque as Mexico. It is, actually, but artists and photographers never seem to travel there. Instead, they go south. Mexico's attraction for them is obvious. It's more archaeological, ethnological, mystical and tragic than Canada. It has revolutions, Day of the Dead, and Frida Kahlo. That's why exhibitions with Mexican themes keep popping up in museums, while Canada, the Rodney Dangerfield of nations, rarely merits a mention. "Eye on Mexico" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is the latest such paean to our Hispanic neighbor.
SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seconds after yesterday's South Jersey Parochial B championship game was over, Bishop Eustace Prep baseball coach Joe Galliera was rubbing his eyes as his Crusaders and the Gloucester Catholic players exchanged the traditional end-of-game handshakes. They were tears of joy. Eustace, behind Don Melroy's four-hit pitching and Sal Racobaldo's two-run triple, defeated Gloucester Catholic, 4-1, before more than 200 fans at Camden County College. "This is the first step," Galliera told his players.
SPORTS
May 29, 1989 | By Marc Narducci, Special to The Inquirer
During his high school career, senior Lou Tortual of Cherry Hill West has never been the ace of the pitching staff, but that doesn't mean he hasn't performed like one. Last year, he was 8-1, but he played second fiddle to Chris Murphy, who has lost only two games during his high school career. Before this season, Tortual was dropped from No. 2 to No. 3, although his skills had not suddenly deteriorated. His drop in status was due to the arrival of a Camden Catholic transfer, Shawn Senior.
SPORTS
May 21, 1989 | By Kevin Tatum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Galliera, the baseball coach at Bishop Eustace Prep, had learned a lot about his team this season. But before the Crusaders met Pemberton yesterday in the first round of the Diamond Classic at Eastern, Galliera wasn't sure how his players would respond if they fell behind early. The answer came in the form of a 6-4 victory. In winning their 16th straight game, the No. 4 team in The Inquirer's South Jersey Top 10 had to overcome a four-run first inning by the 10th-ranked Hornets.
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