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Jeffrey Lurie

SPORTS
September 1, 1994 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Owner's box, Veterans Stadium, third exhibition game. The Eagles have just defeated the Cincinnati Bengals. It is the first and - as it turns out - the only victory of the Jeffrey Lurie era, and the new owner is pleased. The final whistle blows. Eagles win! Eagles win! Seated in the first row of the box, Lurie slowly gets to his feet and begins to applaud. Then the guy sitting to his left notices and stands up and begins clapping. Then the guy to his right - who happens to be club president Harry Gamble - notices and stands up and begins clapping.
SPORTS
September 24, 1998 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles are now 0-3 with no end of losses in sight. Who's to blame? Bobby Hoying? Ray Rhodes? The Bank of Boston? If there is an enduring article of faith in this town, it is that Jeffrey Lurie paid too much for the Birds. Or more on point: borrowed too much from that New England institution, more than $190 million. And now, those who subscribe to this theory will tell you, he is unable or unwilling to spend what it takes to make the team a winner. But is it so?
SPORTS
March 6, 1994 | By Dave Caldwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Michael Matza and Gwen Knapp contributed to this article
Jeffrey Lurie loves pro football so much that he is apparently willing to shell out $185 million for the Eagles. But the similarities between Lurie and a stogie-puffing, chest-thumping, headline-craving, old-boys'-network-aspiring professional sports team owner end right there. Lurie, the 42-year-old heir to a publishing fortune, appears to be a real '90s kind of guy. He has a Ph.D. in social policy from Brandeis University. His doctoral dissertation was titled "The Depiction of Women in Hollywood Movies.
SPORTS
January 13, 1995 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Walsh, who built the San Francisco 49ers into a Super Bowl dynasty, is trying to help Jeffrey Lurie do the same thing in Philadelphia by brokering a deal between his old friend Dick Vermeil and the Eagles. And it appears that Walsh's efforts could pay off. Representatives of Lurie, the Eagles' owner, and Vermeil reviewed counterproposals yesterday, and there is evidence of renewed life for a deal that could bring Vermeil to the Eagles as head coach and general manager. But Lurie, sources said, may not be done interviewing other head coaching candidates.
SPORTS
November 10, 1994 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Veterans Stadium was abuzz - and the Eagles' front office puzzled - yesterday over head coach Rich Kotite's latest remarks about his job status. Kotite expanded on comments he'd made on Tuesday in The Inquirer, acknowledging that new team owner Jeffrey Lurie had made him "a lame duck" coach and that he, too, would evaluate his situation after the season. "I get along extremely well with (Lurie)," Kotite said yesterday after the team's first practice for Cleveland, which will be at Veterans Stadium on Sunday.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Tim Panaccio, Mark Bowden, Amy Rosenberg and Mike Jensen contributed to this article
Miami car dealer Norman Braman - who kept pro football in Philadelphia and built a foundering franchise into a perennial contender, but whose tough negotiating tactics soured his relationship with many players and fans and led to free-agency defections - agreed yesterday to sell the Eagles to Hollywood producer Jeffrey Lurie for a record $185 million. The sale, which must be approved by three-fourths of the NFL's 28 owners, should be completed in four weeks, ending Braman's nine turbulent years as owner of one of the most profitable and enduring franchises in all of pro sports.
SPORTS
August 12, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Eagles quarterback competition will continue all season, and likely for several seasons to come, but the competition for the starting job on Sept. 9 when the regular season opens against the Redskins is over, and Michael Vick is the winner. Vick and Nick Foles are an even match right now, based on the hundreds of snaps taken during training-camp practices and also on the limited sample of Friday night's exhibition game against the Patriots. There are things Vick can do well, and coach Chip Kelly can adjust the offense to take advantage of those.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles organization wants to win immediately with Chip Kelly, and Kelly has purposely eschewed the monologue about rebuilding often recited by new coaches. But Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie, who is Kelly's only boss, will not judge Kelly's first year on how many wins the Eagles accumulate. "I just think it's not in wins and losses," Lurie said in an interview with The Inquirer. "It's absolutely instilling a culture in the program that he brings to it, a sense of preparedness, a pride in being the best you can be for the fans and the team, and winning every day - winning the day, each day. And whatever happens, happens.
SPORTS
July 21, 2010 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The wives stream by, bejeweled and Botoxed, in a high-priced parade of designer labels and expensive perfume. They are laughing, mostly, and why not? They are immaculately dressed down to their open-toed wedge sandals, not an eyelash out of place, not a fingernail chipped, and almost all are carrying boutique bags filled with Gucci and Chanel and Hermes. It is a charmed life, that of an NFL owner's wife. The pedestrian worries of common folks - such as how to pay the soaring electric bill or what to do once the severance payments run out - aren't of their concern.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
A story Monday on the Academy Awards did not mention that Inocente , winner of the Oscar for best documentary short subject, had five executive producers, among them Jeffrey Lurie, owner of the Eagles. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
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