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Jelly Beans

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NEWS
November 8, 1996
In a perfect world, Proposition 209 would never even have been considered. That one-line amendment to the California constitution, approved Tuesday by 54 percent of Californians voting, prohibits affirmative action in government activities - from university admissions to contract awards. Gov. Pete Wilson says the initiative ensures that Californians will be judged only on "individual merit. " Sounds good - in a perfect world. Reality is more complex, as the American Civil Liberties Union asserts in a lawsuit to block enforcement of Prop 209. The ACLU argues that eliminating preferential programs for women and minorities - but allowing preferences for others, such as veterans, athletes or children of alumni - violates the 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection of the laws.
LIVING
November 12, 1996 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jelly beans seemed an odd reference to use as a racial slur. But the innocuous candies took on a sinister connotation last week when it was disclosed that a group of Texaco executives in a secretly recorded discussion about an employee-discrimination suit referred to black employees as "black jelly beans. " Ironically, the term may have found its genesis in a diversity-training session aimed at making managers sensitive and effective in handling matters of race. R. Roosevelt Thomas, one of the nation's leading experts on workforce diversity, confirmed yesterday that he used a jelly bean analogy when he spoke before 20 to 25 Texaco managers in an "executive briefing" in 1992.
SPORTS
October 11, 1999 | By Tom McGurk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
You never know what you might find in Meredith Howell's cleats or shin guards. The Hammonton junior has had everything from squashed jelly beans to broken bits of dog biscuits stuffed inside them in a strange pregame ritual. The routine must be working, because Howell has blossomed into one of the top field hockey scoring threats in South Jersey. After scoring 23 goals as a sophomore, the left inner has pumped in 12 in the Blue Devils' 9-0-1 start. Howell's superstitious routine starts when she consumes half of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a healthy handful of carrots on game day. Then comes the surprise.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Robert Wilson Minter, one-time president of Minter's Candies, who moved to Rhode Island to take over another candy factory and then to Vermont for skiing and community service, died Tuesday after a yearlong battle with lung cancer. He was 80 and lived in Waterbury, Vt. Bob was a man of many interests, including skiing, traveling, sailing and golf. He also had a passion for big-band music. He was born in Philadelphia to Ira Wilson Minter and Ethel Minter. He attended the Haverford School, Amherst College and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Valley Forge Convention Center resembled the landscape of a child's dream. The convention floor was filled with chocolate bunnies, one of which weighed 90 pounds and stood 4 feet high. In one corner stood two huge portraits, one of the Statue of Liberty and one of Princess Diana, made entirely of gourmet jelly beans in such flavors as pina colada and cotton candy. Somewhere buried among the booths and exhibits, a big machine quietly whirred, melting and mixing chocolate and entertaining passers-by.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The whimsical tale had a practical moral. A princess had a magical bird. In the springtime, the bird turned into a rabbit. And since the rabbit had once been a bird, it could lay eggs. And, as folklore has it, that's how the Easter Bunny originated, said a parent who attended a recent hearing on the Voorhees Township School District's holiday and cultural event policy. The point of the story, the parent said, was that the Easter Bunny is a not a religious symbol - and should not be excluded from spring parties or spring bulletin-board displays in public schools.
NEWS
January 29, 1993 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
I keep track of a president's symbols. I consider this part of my duties. Although Bill Clinton has barely arrived at the White House, I have already begun a list of items that people would mention if they were asked what sort of person he is - a list that now includes, among other things, the saxophone, Big Macs, Elvis and male-on-male hugging. Making a list of presidential symbols is not as easy as it sounds. For instance, on their lists some of my colleagues have not one entry for Elvis but separate entries for The Young Elvis and The Older Elvis.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
One jelly bean is hardly enough, but scoop up a handful, and you're in business. Like jelly beans, one-act plays are rarely satisfying on their own, but a bunch - four, in this case - makes for an amusing evening in the theater. Unwrap Your Candy: An Evening of One-Act Plays by Doug Wright (I Am My Own Wife and Quills) is Luna Theatre Company's tricky treat, just in time for Halloween. Take those jelly beans one at a time, and you've got: No. 1: "Unwrap Your Candy. " You know that annoying announcement at the start of every show, asking you to turn off your cell phone or beeper, and ending with, and please unwrap your candy now?
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathy and Ron Tonuci are visiting the Albert Einstein Medical Center's Daroff Division in South Philadelphia this Good Friday, passing out small plastic Easter eggs. Except for taking time out a month and a half ago to have a baby, Kathy has been stuffing the eggs almost non-stop for weeks. The stuffing, says Kathy, is "nothing fancy. A little Easter straw, a few jelly beans and . . . " And a handmade rosary. The Tonucis, parents of three young daughters and lay members of a religious order of nuns and priests, have been making, and giving away, the beads for three years "to spread devotion to the rosary.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Children of all ages count on the Easter bunny's bringing them a basket filled with chocolate eggs and jelly beans each year. Usually Mom and Dad are working behind the scenes to help make the deliveries. However, the residents of Villa St. Teresa in Darby Borough and Don Quanella School in Broomall received their candy not from a bunny, but from a clown named Lady Rosebud and her husband. "The kids always look forward to receiving the Easter candy," said the Rev. Enzo Addari, director of Don Quanella, a residential school for retarded boys ages 6 though 21. "They feel great that someone remembers them.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Apple may be aiming for its just-released iWatch to be the timepiece of the summer, but as it stands, the JoyJoy! brand is more than a few hours ahead, emerging as the year's must-have digital arm candy for tweens, teens - and their moms. In just eight months, Saul Denenberg and Brett Pulli have sold more than 15,000 of the light-up watch heads and graphic-heavy interchangeable bands. Available nationwide in 357 surf stores and boutiques, including the upscale Fred Segal, the Souderton-based JoyJoy!
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
ONE OF the best things about going to the Toronto International Film Festival each September is what seems to be an annual interview with Keira Knightley. From "Atonement" in 2007 through "Anna Karenina" and "A Dangerous Method," Knightley has been a festival staple and one of the best actress interviews out there. She's friendly, good-humored and a thorough researcher of her roles. Most importantly, she's chatty. Ask her a question and you get a real answer and not a series of talking points that show up in every writer's interview.
SPORTS
May 20, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
She had so many true and heartfelt things to say about her school, and Emily Moran's greatest worry, as she prepared to deliver the commencement address Sunday at La Salle University, was that the words would pour out of her into a shapeless pile, like jelly beans from a bag. She has always talked fast, especially among those she knows best and loves most. "They keep telling me, 'You have to slow down,' " she said. It's no wonder why. She has five siblings. Her father is one of 15, and from those 14 aunts and uncles Emily Moran has 86 cousins.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Tarell Alvin McCraney has been scooping up grants, prizes, and residencies like jelly beans; he is young, black, and gay, and his trilogy, "The Brother/Sister Plays," gives voice to the voiceless. The Brothers Size , in a haunting production at Simpatico Theatre Project, is the middle play of the three. The setting is San Pere, La., and the time is the tantalizing "Distant Present. " The older of the Brothers Size is Ogun (Carlo Campbell), who owns a car repair shop; his exasperating younger brother Oshoosi (Akeem Davis)
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Robert Wilson Minter, one-time president of Minter's Candies, who moved to Rhode Island to take over another candy factory and then to Vermont for skiing and community service, died Tuesday after a yearlong battle with lung cancer. He was 80 and lived in Waterbury, Vt. Bob was a man of many interests, including skiing, traveling, sailing and golf. He also had a passion for big-band music. He was born in Philadelphia to Ira Wilson Minter and Ethel Minter. He attended the Haverford School, Amherst College and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2009 | By APRIL LISANTE For the Daily News
EVERY YEAR, Americans spend millions on Easter candy, from chocolate rabbits to marshmallow eggs. This year alone, we'll consume 90 million chocolate bunnies and munch on 16 billion jelly beans, according to industry statistics. But hard times will impact even the Easter Bunny, as the National Retail Federation reports that people will spend less on candy this year than last - an average of $16.55 vs. $18.12 a person. When the time comes to fill a basket with sugary treats, how will you choose the best among the colorfully wrapped candies crowding local supermarket and drug store shelves?
FOOD
March 20, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the more profitable investments we make as children is believing that a large and kindhearted rabbit eludes the family dog or the house alarm system to hide a basket filled with candy behind a curtain, in a bathtub, or atop the refrigerator. As wisdom and age set in, we lose that innocence and, as a result, its toothsome profits: No more Easter basket for most of us. There's a grown-up way to cash in: Incorporate the elements of a classic Easter basket into a holiday meal while preserving the food traditions that set this Sunday meal apart from others.
NEWS
October 23, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
One jelly bean is hardly enough, but scoop up a handful, and you're in business. Like jelly beans, one-act plays are rarely satisfying on their own, but a bunch - four, in this case - makes for an amusing evening in the theater. Unwrap Your Candy: An Evening of One-Act Plays by Doug Wright (I Am My Own Wife and Quills) is Luna Theatre Company's tricky treat, just in time for Halloween. Take those jelly beans one at a time, and you've got: No. 1: "Unwrap Your Candy. " You know that annoying announcement at the start of every show, asking you to turn off your cell phone or beeper, and ending with, and please unwrap your candy now?
NEWS
April 14, 2006 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over at Aunt Charlotte's Candies in Merchantville, the people are demanding: Show us the bunny! Chocolate-covered Peeps are flying out the door at Bayard's in Cherry Hill. The coconut cream eggs are rolling at Stutz Candy in Mayfair. And by today, things may get really crazy. With two more candy-shopping days until Easter, the region's sweets shops are in the throes of preholiday sugar mega-rush. It started weeks ago, and it happens every year - folks queueing up and packing in to stock up on their but-it-wouldn't-be-Easter-without-confectionery favorites.
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