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Jerry Bruckheimer

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - I don't think anyone in Rockford, Ill., is losing any sleep over whether Jerry Bruckheimer has hit the skids or not. But in Hollywood, where dissecting other people's failures is something of a national pastime, the knives are out for the veteran producer, who has had a rocky last 18 months, what with the disastrous opening of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" coming on the heels of a series of relative duds, including "The Prince of Persia: The...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Jerry Bruckheimer doesn't look like the most successful producer in the annals of movies, aiming to become the most successful producer in the annals of television. Laid-back, soft-spoken and introspective, the unassuming guy in black Polartec is, in fact, a wiry multitasker famous for booming, muscular crowd-pleasers such as Top Gun, Armageddon and Pirates of the Caribbean. He's also the engine that drives the highest-rated series on TV, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, as well as its sister, CSI: Miami (both on CBS)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010
7 p.m. FX Bearing the typically fast pacing of films by producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Armageddon") and director Tony Scott ("Top Gun"), this 1998 action saga casts Will Smith as an attorney on the run.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Jerry Bruckheimer, the producer whose films include National Treasure and Pirates of the Caribbean , has a formula. It goes something like this. Take a mainstream script - the hunt for missing treasure, say - and cast it with an off-center actor to give the marshmallow some texture and edge. So it is with The Sorcerer's Apprentice , a hearty helping of movie comfort food, the seventh collaboration between Bruckheimer and Mr. Live From Off-Center himself, Nicolas Cage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"Beverly Hills Cop II," a comedy-drama starring Eddie Murphy, Judge Reinhold, John Ashton and Brigitte Nielsen. Screenplay by Larry Ferguson and Warren Skaaren. Directed by Tony Scott. Produced by Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer. A Paramount Pictures release. At area theaters. The $350 million worth of moviegoers who thought "Beverly Hills Cop" was hilarious and that Eddie Murphy was just about the funniest man alive will find "Beverly Hills Cop II" equally irresistible. The comparative handful of moviegoers who thought Murphy's comedy was in short supply in the first "Cop" - and that it was so sanitized for the mass audience that it lost the street nastiness that made his "Saturday Night Live" characters fresh and startlingly funny - will find "Cop II" equally disappointing.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services and the New York Post contributed to this report
Channel 6's David Henry reports 46; famous brother Frank Stallone produces 47. Guess this settles it: Will Smith is an action hero. After lucrative star turns in "Men in Black" and "Independence Day," the rapper-turned-actor appears to have no interest in branching out to try a little romantic comedy, maybe a little drama. He's just signed to do "Enemy of the State," a big-budget spy thriller produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, who does all those explosion-heavy pictures like "Con Air" and "The Rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Black Hawk Down, the $90 million Sony Pictures reenactment of the battle on the streets of Mogadishu, director Ridley Scott has delivered a challenging new form of war movie that avoids making political statements. With praise from critics and a marketing campaign that plays up the heroism of the young American troops, the harrowingly straightforward depiction of an Army mission gone bad has strong box-office prospects. And it's clear that producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Columbia Pictures smell Academy Award nominations (Scott's work debuted in New York and Los Angeles last month in order to qualify)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
DIRECTOR JON Turteltaub still remembers the Liberty Bell guide who showed him around when he came to Philadelphia three years ago to scout locations for his next film. Turteltaub liked the park officer's spiel so much he ended up putting it in "National Treasure," a Jerry Bruckheimer caper about a search for a war chest hidden by the Founding Fathers that stars Nicolas Cage and opens today. "She was so charming and funny and smart," he said. "When we wrote the speech that the tour guide gives at the Liberty Bell, we based it on the speech that she gave to me while I was there.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
The $350 million worth of moviegoers who thought "Beverly Hills Cop" was hilarious and that Eddie Murphy was just about the funniest man alive will find "Beverly Hills Cop II" equally irresistible. The comparative handful of moviegoers who thought Murphy's comedy was in short supply in the first "Cop" - and that it was so sanitized for the mass audience that it lost the street nastiness that made his "Saturday Night Live" characters fresh and startlingly funny - will find "Cop II" equally disappointing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2010
THE WHOLE TRUTH. 10 tonight, Channel 6. WHAT DO you get when you insert a playwright from Drexel Hill who's all about his characters into the action-packed TV world of producer Jerry Bruckheimer? "The Whole Truth. " Created by Upper Darby High alum Tom Donaghy (Class of '81), who's also a co-executive producer, ABC'S new legal drama stars Rob Morrow ("Numbers") and Maura Tierney ("ER") as former law school classmates who find themselves on opposite sides of the courtroom most weeks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2010
THE WHOLE TRUTH. 10 tonight, Channel 6. WHAT DO you get when you insert a playwright from Drexel Hill who's all about his characters into the action-packed TV world of producer Jerry Bruckheimer? "The Whole Truth. " Created by Upper Darby High alum Tom Donaghy (Class of '81), who's also a co-executive producer, ABC'S new legal drama stars Rob Morrow ("Numbers") and Maura Tierney ("ER") as former law school classmates who find themselves on opposite sides of the courtroom most weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - I don't think anyone in Rockford, Ill., is losing any sleep over whether Jerry Bruckheimer has hit the skids or not. But in Hollywood, where dissecting other people's failures is something of a national pastime, the knives are out for the veteran producer, who has had a rocky last 18 months, what with the disastrous opening of "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" coming on the heels of a series of relative duds, including "The Prince of Persia: The...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
THE SUMMER OF '10 may be remembered as the season Jerry Bruckheimer lost his Midas touch. I long ago ceased to question Bruckheimer's uncanny sense of audience taste - I gazed uncomprehendingly at sequels to "Pirates of the Caribbean" and "National Treasure," and was just as dumbfounded by their cumulative box office (a billion or two). Lately, though, his gift for turning leaden scripts into gold seems to have deserted him - "Prince of Persia," though a much less awful film than "National Treasure 2," is a certifiable bomb.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Jerry Bruckheimer, the producer whose films include National Treasure and Pirates of the Caribbean , has a formula. It goes something like this. Take a mainstream script - the hunt for missing treasure, say - and cast it with an off-center actor to give the marshmallow some texture and edge. So it is with The Sorcerer's Apprentice , a hearty helping of movie comfort food, the seventh collaboration between Bruckheimer and Mr. Live From Off-Center himself, Nicolas Cage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010
7 p.m. FX Bearing the typically fast pacing of films by producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Armageddon") and director Tony Scott ("Top Gun"), this 1998 action saga casts Will Smith as an attorney on the run.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
DIRECTOR JON Turteltaub still remembers the Liberty Bell guide who showed him around when he came to Philadelphia three years ago to scout locations for his next film. Turteltaub liked the park officer's spiel so much he ended up putting it in "National Treasure," a Jerry Bruckheimer caper about a search for a war chest hidden by the Founding Fathers that stars Nicolas Cage and opens today. "She was so charming and funny and smart," he said. "When we wrote the speech that the tour guide gives at the Liberty Bell, we based it on the speech that she gave to me while I was there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL -- For the Daily News
Antoine Fuqua wasn't the least bit surprised when he got a phone call last year summoning him to movie producer Jerry Bruckheimer's office. The two had wanted to work together for years, ever since Fuqua directed "Gangsta's Paradise," a music video starring Coolio, for Bruckheimer's 1995 film, "Dangerous Minds. " What caught Fuqua off guard was the type of project Bruckheimer wanted him to take on: a big-budget epic film about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table set in 400 A.D. Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Jerry Bruckheimer doesn't look like the most successful producer in the annals of movies, aiming to become the most successful producer in the annals of television. Laid-back, soft-spoken and introspective, the unassuming guy in black Polartec is, in fact, a wiry multitasker famous for booming, muscular crowd-pleasers such as Top Gun, Armageddon and Pirates of the Caribbean. He's also the engine that drives the highest-rated series on TV, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, as well as its sister, CSI: Miami (both on CBS)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Black Hawk Down, the $90 million Sony Pictures reenactment of the battle on the streets of Mogadishu, director Ridley Scott has delivered a challenging new form of war movie that avoids making political statements. With praise from critics and a marketing campaign that plays up the heroism of the young American troops, the harrowingly straightforward depiction of an Army mission gone bad has strong box-office prospects. And it's clear that producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Columbia Pictures smell Academy Award nominations (Scott's work debuted in New York and Los Angeles last month in order to qualify)
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