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Jerry Crawford

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NEWS
August 22, 2010 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerry Crawford worked Sunday's Phillies-Washington game at Citizens Bank Park with a lump in his throat and, by his own admission, a bit weepy-eyed. Crawford is an umpire, an occupation that's prompted fans to scream some of the darndest things in his direction. But it was nothing anyone said that left Crawford so emotional. He was fighting back the tears because it was the final game he officiated in the city where he was born, the region where he was raised to be an umpire by his father, the late Shag Crawford.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jerry Crawford, the home team was always the umpires. This man who grew up and still lives in Havertown, about an infield single away from the West Chester Pike, used to go down to Connie Mack Stadium with his younger brother and listen to the fans bellowing out insults at the umps. The two would erupt right back at them. Get right in their faces. "We're a pretty fiery bunch," Crawford said. And they had family honor to uphold. Their father, Shag Crawford, was a legendary umpire.
SPORTS
September 29, 2003 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many fans, the most treasured memories of Veterans Stadium have nothing to do with a Mike Schmidt at-bat, a Steve Carlton pitch or a World Series victory. They have more to do with the bonding that took place with a parent as they spent time together at the ballpark. Forget about its shortcomings. The Vet left an indelible impression, especially on fathers and sons who attended their first ball games together. Fathers and sons. Many took one last trip together to the Vet yesterday, perhaps recalling the way Willie Montanez used to twirl his bat as he came to the plate, or how Yo-Yo used to chomp on his cigar and entertain fans with his trademark jig behind home plate, or how they madly scrambled after a foul ball that had been hit into their section.
SPORTS
September 2, 1999 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
It was closing in on 4 p.m. yesterday when Jerry Crawford made a startling discovery. "Hey, it's sunny outside," he said, ducking from the hallways and conference rooms for a quick look through a window. The moment's irony was not lost on him, or on many of the media who were captured more than captivated by the tedious drip of the day's proceedings. Jerry Crawford belonged outside, in that sun or under some illuminous lights, calling outs and strikes, maybe even throwing a guy out of a game.
SPORTS
July 12, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Longtime major-league umpire Shag Crawford, 90, a Philadelphia native and patriarch of a family of sports officials, died yesterday. His son Jerry said Mr. Crawford died at an assisted- living facility in the suburbs. Jerry Crawford became a big-league umpire in the mid-1970s, about the time his brother, Joey, became an NBA official. Born Henry Charles Crawford, Shag called more than 3,000 games as a National League umpire from 1956 to '75. He worked the World Series three times and the NL Championship Series twice, and handled three All-Star Games.
SPORTS
August 23, 2010 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Crawford worked Sunday's Phillies-Washington game at Citizens Bank Park with a lump in his throat and, by his own admission, a bit weepy-eyed. Crawford is an umpire, an occupation that has prompted fans to scream some of the darnedest things in his direction. But it was nothing anyone had said that left Crawford so emotional. He was fighting back the tears because it was the final game he would officiate in the city where he was born, the region where he was raised to be an umpire by his father, the late Shag Crawford.
SPORTS
July 13, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shag Crawford, 90, the square-jawed, hard-nosed umpire who raised two professional sports officials, died Wednesday in the Glen Mills assisted-living facility where he had lived for the last year. Mr. Crawford, who never earned more than $35,000 a year in baseball, worked the first of more than 3,000 National League games in 1956. In 20 seasons, he umpired three World Series, two NL championship series, and three All-Star Games. The West Philadelphia native's nickname and his passionate, no-nonsense style helped him stand out in an era when umpires often were as nondescript as the black uniforms they wore in both cold and heat.
SPORTS
October 13, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre finish, the Chicago White Sox tied the American League Championship Series at a game apiece with a 2-1 win over the Los Angeles Angels last night at U.S. Cellular Field. The Angels saw things a lot differently, however. They believed the White Sox stole the win. Here's what happened in a see-it-to-believe-it bottom-of-the-ninth: With two outs, Angels reliever Kelvim Escobar appeared to strike out A.J. Pierzynski and force extra innings. Home-plate umpire Doug Eddings pumped his fist after Pierzynski swung at a low pitch, and Angels players began running to the dugout.
SPORTS
December 1, 1999 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
It should have ended with more flair, more fire, more fight. Richie Phillips's 21-year tenure as the umpires union boss should have ended like that final scene in "A Few Good Men," with Richie screaming, "You're messing with the wrong litigator!" as he tried to break all restraints and rip out the throats of the umpires who led the revolt against him. Instead, it ended quietly and dully in a conference room on the 36th floor of the Jacob Javits Federal Building in lower Manhattan, without Phillips even present.
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SPORTS
August 23, 2010 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
Jerry Crawford heard something that umpires rarely hear: a warm ovation from the fans. Then the game started. In a ceremony at home plate, the Philadelphia native was honored for his 34 seasons as a full-time major league umpire. He has announced his retirement at the end of the season. "To be honest, I've been choked up the whole game," the 63-year-old said during the rain delay in yesterday's game. "I've been looking around. I didn't think it was going to affect me this way, but I've been weepy-eyed all day. I saw my sister up there and I started to tear up again.
SPORTS
August 23, 2010 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Crawford worked Sunday's Phillies-Washington game at Citizens Bank Park with a lump in his throat and, by his own admission, a bit weepy-eyed. Crawford is an umpire, an occupation that has prompted fans to scream some of the darnedest things in his direction. But it was nothing anyone had said that left Crawford so emotional. He was fighting back the tears because it was the final game he would officiate in the city where he was born, the region where he was raised to be an umpire by his father, the late Shag Crawford.
SPORTS
July 13, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shag Crawford, 90, the square-jawed, hard-nosed umpire who raised two professional sports officials, died Wednesday in the Glen Mills assisted-living facility where he had lived for the last year. Mr. Crawford, who never earned more than $35,000 a year in baseball, worked the first of more than 3,000 National League games in 1956. In 20 seasons, he umpired three World Series, two NL championship series, and three All-Star Games. The West Philadelphia native's nickname and his passionate, no-nonsense style helped him stand out in an era when umpires often were as nondescript as the black uniforms they wore in both cold and heat.
SPORTS
July 12, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Longtime major-league umpire Shag Crawford, 90, a Philadelphia native and patriarch of a family of sports officials, died yesterday. His son Jerry said Mr. Crawford died at an assisted- living facility in the suburbs. Jerry Crawford became a big-league umpire in the mid-1970s, about the time his brother, Joey, became an NBA official. Born Henry Charles Crawford, Shag called more than 3,000 games as a National League umpire from 1956 to '75. He worked the World Series three times and the NL Championship Series twice, and handled three All-Star Games.
SPORTS
October 13, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre finish, the Chicago White Sox tied the American League Championship Series at a game apiece with a 2-1 win over the Los Angeles Angels last night at U.S. Cellular Field. The Angels saw things a lot differently, however. They believed the White Sox stole the win. Here's what happened in a see-it-to-believe-it bottom-of-the-ninth: With two outs, Angels reliever Kelvim Escobar appeared to strike out A.J. Pierzynski and force extra innings. Home-plate umpire Doug Eddings pumped his fist after Pierzynski swung at a low pitch, and Angels players began running to the dugout.
SPORTS
September 29, 2003 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many fans, the most treasured memories of Veterans Stadium have nothing to do with a Mike Schmidt at-bat, a Steve Carlton pitch or a World Series victory. They have more to do with the bonding that took place with a parent as they spent time together at the ballpark. Forget about its shortcomings. The Vet left an indelible impression, especially on fathers and sons who attended their first ball games together. Fathers and sons. Many took one last trip together to the Vet yesterday, perhaps recalling the way Willie Montanez used to twirl his bat as he came to the plate, or how Yo-Yo used to chomp on his cigar and entertain fans with his trademark jig behind home plate, or how they madly scrambled after a foul ball that had been hit into their section.
SPORTS
December 1, 1999 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
It should have ended with more flair, more fire, more fight. Richie Phillips's 21-year tenure as the umpires union boss should have ended like that final scene in "A Few Good Men," with Richie screaming, "You're messing with the wrong litigator!" as he tried to break all restraints and rip out the throats of the umpires who led the revolt against him. Instead, it ended quietly and dully in a conference room on the 36th floor of the Jacob Javits Federal Building in lower Manhattan, without Phillips even present.
SPORTS
September 2, 1999 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
It was closing in on 4 p.m. yesterday when Jerry Crawford made a startling discovery. "Hey, it's sunny outside," he said, ducking from the hallways and conference rooms for a quick look through a window. The moment's irony was not lost on him, or on many of the media who were captured more than captivated by the tedious drip of the day's proceedings. Jerry Crawford belonged outside, in that sun or under some illuminous lights, calling outs and strikes, maybe even throwing a guy out of a game.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jerry Crawford, the home team was always the umpires. This man who grew up and still lives in Havertown, about an infield single away from the West Chester Pike, used to go down to Connie Mack Stadium with his younger brother and listen to the fans bellowing out insults at the umps. The two would erupt right back at them. Get right in their faces. "We're a pretty fiery bunch," Crawford said. And they had family honor to uphold. Their father, Shag Crawford, was a legendary umpire.
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