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Jerry Sandusky

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November 12, 2011 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - After a sharp right turn off East College Avenue, drivers are treated to a sign that reads "road closed ahead. " Drive a little farther up the narrow, winding road and motorists are alerted to "Watch Children" before again being reminded the road is closed except for "local traffic. " It's a week since the news surfaced of the unfathomable sexual abuse charges against former longtime Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky. Aside from a couple of rumored sightings, Sandusky has managed for the most part to lay low. But that hasn't stopped the occasional person from driving by to see where Sandusky lives, right in front of Lemont Elementary School and a playground.
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November 6, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
So what manner of a man is this Jerry Sandusky? On Nov. 13, 1999, he received a standing ovation from a crowd of 96,480. It was the occasion of his official retirement as dean of Linebacker U's impenetrable defense. For a long, long time, he was thought to be the successor to Joe Paterno. When he finally decided to leave the fold, after 32 years of unswerving loyalty and uncommon patience, they had him run out onto the Beaver Stadium sod for the last time. What must that have felt like, to hear a whole stadium of fans, on their feet, chanting your name, with Happy Valley reverberating with thunderclaps of applause and former players encircling you with hugs?
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Ruling that Jerry Sandusky had sufficient time to prepare his defense to charges that he sexually assaulted teen-aged boys, a Centre County judge on Wednesday denied Sandusky's request for a new trial. Jurors convicted the former Penn State assistant football coach of 45 counts of sexual abuse of minors in a case that drew international attention. In October, he was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. Seeking to reopen the matter, Sandusky, 68, appealed. He argued that the denial of a request for a trial delay amounted to a denial of his Constitutional right to an attorney.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky was transferred Wednesday to a maximum-security prison in the far southwestern corner of Pennsylvania where he will serve his 30- to 60-year sentence. At the State Correctional Institution at Greene, the former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach's fellow inmates will include most of the state's death-row prisoners and convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. On Sunday, Sandusky was moved to the state prison in Camp Hill, where he was medically and psychologically evaluated, the Department of Corrections said.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors on Wednesday filed new child sex-abuse charges against Jerry Sandusky, bringing to 10 the number of boys they say the former football coach molested or raped over the past decade. State police arrested Sandusky at his State College home and led him, draped in a blue-and-white Penn State track suit, in handcuffs into court. At a preliminary arraignment, Magisterial District Judge Robert E. Scott increased Sandusky's bail to $250,000 cash. He was taken to Centre County prison after being unable to immediately post bail.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 600 potential jurors are slated to pack Centre County's courthouse Tuesday as lawyers begin the tedious task of finding a dozen who have not already made up their minds about Jerry Sandusky. In a county where the child sex abuse allegations against the former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach have already tarnished the reputation of a university and led to the downfall of local hero and former head coach Joe Paterno, that task is likely to prove challenging.
SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
IN HINDSIGHT, Joe Paterno wrote, the day after he got fired with a phone call, he wished he had done more. He had not committed a crime, he had not witnessed a crime, he had reported what sounded like a crime to his superiors. The haters jumped all over that sentence, like it was some kind of a confession that the legendary Penn State football coach had somehow enabled Jerry Sandusky to sexually abuse those kids, while he looked the other way. The haters spent a lot less time debating the note he scribbled on a pad before going to the hospital, where he died, the note that said, "Maybe the silver lining in this is that some good can come of this.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | Associated Press
Pennsylvania State University president Rodney Erickson will meet with alumni in town hall-style meetings in King of Prussia, Pittsburgh, and New York City next week to discuss the child-sex-abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. The first session is set for Wednesday night at the Doubletree by Hilton hotel in Pittsburgh. Erickson will lead a second session next Thursday at the Radisson Hotel Valley Forge on First Avenue in King of Prussia.
SPORTS
October 9, 2012 | By Emily Kaplan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - At 10:31 a.m. on Tuesday, the large flat screen on the first floor of Penn State's student center flashed with a red breaking news update. The TV was streaming CNN all morning. Twelve miles away, Jerry Sandusky, the former assistant football coach who was found guilty of sexually abusing 10 boys in a scandal that rattled this campus, was about to hear his fate. But here, in the HUB Robeson-Center, only 11 students sat facing the TV to hear the sentence. One of the students was napping.
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August 9, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for the NCAA, Gov. Corbett, and other state officials think they can settle within the next month a lawsuit over the $60 million in penalties Penn State is paying for its mishandling of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual- abuse scandal. In a joint motion filed Wednesday in federal court in Harrisburg, the sides said another month would give them a "meaningful opportunity" to resolve the lawsuit. However, nine members of the university's board of trustees have recommended a meeting Aug. 22 to decide on an official negotiating position for Penn State in the matter.
SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
IN HINDSIGHT, Joe Paterno wrote, the day after he got fired with a phone call, he wished he had done more. He had not committed a crime, he had not witnessed a crime, he had reported what sounded like a crime to his superiors. The haters jumped all over that sentence, like it was some kind of a confession that the legendary Penn State football coach had somehow enabled Jerry Sandusky to sexually abuse those kids, while he looked the other way. The haters spent a lot less time debating the note he scribbled on a pad before going to the hospital, where he died, the note that said, "Maybe the silver lining in this is that some good can come of this.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Five U.S. representatives from Pennsylvania have asked the NCAA to rescind the penalties imposed on Pennsylvania State University for its leaders' handling of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal. "Continuing these unprecedented sanctions harms innocent student athletes and further erodes the increasingly specious credibility" of the NCAA, the five lawmakers wrote in a July 24 letter to Mark Emmert, president of the organization that oversees college sports. The representatives cited an April 9 Commonwealth Court ruling that sharply questioned the validity of a consent decree between the NCAA and Penn State imposing the penalties.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Paterno's son is suing Pennsylvania State University, saying his reputation was destroyed when the school fired him and another assistant football coach in the midst of the Jerry Sandusky investigation. In the civil rights suit, filed Monday in federal court in Philadelphia, Joseph "Jay" Paterno and Bill Kenney say they suffered collateral damage from the siege of bad publicity for the university after Sandusky was indicted for child sex abuse in November 2011 and the elder Paterno was dismissed after decades as head coach.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Sandusky, the adopted son of Jerry Sandusky, who has said Sandusky molested him as a child, will appear in a televised interview with Oprah Winfrey next week. In the interview, scheduled to air at 9 p.m. July 17 on Winfrey's OWN Network, Sandusky is expected to give a personal account of the abuse he says he suffered as a child. It will be his first public interview since his adoptive father's 2012 conviction on child sex-abuse charges. In a brief video clip posted on Winfrey's website, Sandusky says to Winfrey, "At bedtime, his ritual began.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a dramatic news conference two weeks ago, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane strongly suggested that two credible victims could have been spared harm if the state's investigation of child sex abuser Jerry Sandusky had moved more urgently. One day later, Kane's aides acknowledged that she misspoke about one of the victims - and that prosecutors in place before she took office had used the man's case to convict Sandusky. And on Wednesday, state police raised new questions about Kane's claim that a second credible victim was assaulted while the investigation dragged on. They said Kane's current chief of staff, veteran state prosecutor Bruce Beemer, did not support bringing charges based on this victim.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University, which is under federal scrutiny for its handling of sexual assault cases, is creating a task force to better investigate and prevent such incidents on campus, the president announced Wednesday. In an e-mail to Penn State staff, president Eric J. Barron said "we are confident" that the university's policies comply with Title IX, the law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and requires universities to investigate sexual assaults. "However," he wrote, "I do not believe that we should be satisfied with compliance - instead we should become a true leader in the prevention of sexual assault and in investigating and adjudicating student-on-student sexual assault cases while best protecting the wishes, and where appropriate and possible, the confidentiality of the survivors.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
This story was updated Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. The leadership of the association for district attorneys in Pennsylvania on Tuesday criticized state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane for comments that "disparaged" the prosecutors who convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky. The Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, in a statement endorsed by its executive committee, said that recommendations made by a law professor who investigated the Sandusky case were "overshadowed by the attorney general's continued public attacks on the successful work of career prosecutors.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
As odious as it may be, the State Employees' Retirement System board apparently has no choice but to restore convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky's $4,900-a-month pension. The former Penn State coach was stripped of his pension after his 2011 arrest and subsequent conviction for sexually assaulting 10 boys. But an arbiter has ruled that taking away the pension was not justified because Sandusky retired in 1999, and sex crimes weren't added to the list of offenses that can cost a state employee his pension until 2004.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - On Monday, Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said she would "love to sit all day" and answer questions about her office's review of why her predecessors took so long to bring charges against serial child-abuser Jerry Sandusky. That was before her office acknowledged that she erred on a key and emotionally charged question: whether any children had been abused by Sandusky while the 33-month-long state investigation was ongoing. On Friday, Kane refused to answer questions about the issue or clarify her comments.
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