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Jerry Wolman

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NEWS
April 10, 2009
Re Stan Hochman's piece, "Snider-Wolman Feud": I'd like to comment as I know Jerry Wolman better than most people. I've worked for Jerry for more than 20 years and can assure you that he's not a bitter man, nor does he hold grudges. His only comment over the years about Mr. Snider was, "He is not worth talking about. " Jerry is a kind and compassionate person. He has an interest in everyone, from the janitor in our building to the president of the U.S. Jerry makes everyone feel loved.
SPORTS
August 8, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
NEARLY 50 YEARS ago, Jerry Wolman did not actually own everything in Philadelphia sports - it just seemed that way. Wolman owned the Eagles, which he bought in 1963 for the fabulous sum of $5,505,000. He owned Connie Mack Stadium, where the Phillies played their games. He part-owned the Flyers and the Spectrum along with Ed Snider. It was an unprecedented empire in Philadelphia sports. The irony, of course, is that the empire was eclipsed decades later by the one built by Snider, the former protégé and partner whom Wolman blamed for failing to help rescue him during the financial crisis that cost him both teams.
SPORTS
December 11, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
There was a time in Philadelphia when the name Jerry Wolman was as familiar to Eagles fans as the name Jeff Lurie is now. In fact, the similarities go way beyond their being household names in the city. Like Lurie, when Wolman first bought the team he promised the sun, the moon and a championship, but soon found himself the steward of a horrible football team not unlike the one Lurie now has. And, by the time the name Jerry Wolman was traded in for the name Leonard Tose on the head desk in the Eagles' front office, he was about as popular an owner as Lurie is now. When Wolman sold the Eagles to Tose in 1969 and eventually returned to his home in a Washington suburb, he quietly began rebuilding his fortune while his name faded into obscurity on the city's sports scene.
SPORTS
June 25, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though time and a bitter feud have obscured his significant role in the sporting history of a city where he nearly lost his fortune and reputation, Jerry Wolman was back at the center of Philadelphia power Thursday. The onetime Eagles owner and Spectrum developer launched his biography, Jerry Wolman: The World's Richest Man , cowritten by Richard and Joseph Bockol, at an afternoon reception in City Hall. Wolman, 83, wrote the book now, he said, because as his grandchildren grew older they grew more curious about his life.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
Marie Conway Salvey, a well known Eagles fan from Upper Darby, died Wednesday at Fair Acres Geriatric Center in Lima, Delaware County. She was 92. In the mid-1960s, Jerry Wolman, then owner of the Eagles, named Salvey the team's No. 1 fan, said Salvey's son, Charles. Wolman himself took Salvey to Los Angeles to see an Eagles-Rams game, then to Dallas to see the Eagles play the Cowboys, her son said. "She never missed a game," he said. "I knew her life was coming to an end when she decided she wasn't interested in watching the Super Bowl on TV in January.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News Staff Writer Mary Flannery contributed to this report
When Ed Snider as a young boy peddled vegetables at his father's grocery store, he showed hustle. When two decades ago he assumed full control of the Philadelphia Flyers and the Spectrum from his one-time mentor and boss, Jerry Wolman, igniting a fiery dispute between them that persists to this day, he showed hustle. And that hustle is as strong as ever, now that his company is moving into high gear, building premier sports and entertainment palaces. Spectacor's success has its roots in a Washington, D.C., corner grocery store once owned by Ed Snider's late father, Sol. On Saturday afternoons he sold wilting vegetables unlikely to survive until Monday.
SPORTS
March 4, 1994 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
All afternoon, all evening, the calls poured in. From Ed in the Northeast, Chuck in Roxborough, Karen in Cherry Hill, Joe in South Philly. They all said the same thing. They were Eagles fans and they felt liberated. Norman Braman, it was reported, was negotiating a sale of the Eagles to Jeff Lurie, a Hollywood producer, for the hefty sum of $196 million. Lurie has no ties to the area, he has no background in sports, he is a Hollywood wheeler-dealer. He is the kind of guy who would, in most cases, be viewed suspiciously by blue-collar Philadelphia.
SPORTS
October 5, 2004 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nick Skorich, who took over as head coach of the NFL champion Philadelphia Eagles in 1961 and came within a roughing-the-punter penalty of leading the team back to the title game, died Saturday at Presbyterian Hospital, apparently of an infection after recent heart-valve surgery. He was 83 and lived in Mansfield Township, Burlington County. "He was one of the best," recalled former Eagles cornerback Tom Brookshier, who suffered a career-ending broken leg during Mr. Skorich's first season as head coach.
SPORTS
March 17, 2009
IN PHILADELPHIA, Ed Snider tells people that the Spectrum is his "baby" and that he will be heartsick when they implode it before the end of the year. In Potomac, Md., Jerry Wolman gnashes his teeth and snarls, "Ed Snider didn't put a dime into the Spectrum. " Whose fingerprints are on the blueprints? Whose DNA is in the design? Can we put the Spectrum on the Maury Povich show and have him yelp at the doomed 41-year-old arena, "Who's your daddy?" Wolman says he borrowed the money to build the Spectrum, picked the architects, hired the construction company that brought the project in ahead of schedule and under budget.
SPORTS
April 7, 1994 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six p.m. was approaching, Leonard Tose was looking forward to his regular evening Scotch, and the call-waiting device on his telephone, in his house in Villanova, was clicking away madly. To Tose, it was music. "Everyone wants to know what I think," said Tose, the former owner of the Eagles, now twice removed. This is what Tose thinks: The pending sale of the Eagles to movie producer Jeffrey Lurie from car mogul Norman Braman for $185 million is potentially excellent news for local football fans, and in that group he includes himself.
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SPORTS
August 8, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
NEARLY 50 YEARS ago, Jerry Wolman did not actually own everything in Philadelphia sports - it just seemed that way. Wolman owned the Eagles, which he bought in 1963 for the fabulous sum of $5,505,000. He owned Connie Mack Stadium, where the Phillies played their games. He part-owned the Flyers and the Spectrum along with Ed Snider. It was an unprecedented empire in Philadelphia sports. The irony, of course, is that the empire was eclipsed decades later by the one built by Snider, the former protégé and partner whom Wolman blamed for failing to help rescue him during the financial crisis that cost him both teams.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry Wolman, 86, the son of a coal-region grocer who became a pivotal figure in Philadelphia's sports history after amassing a fortune in construction and real estate, died Tuesday after a long illness at his home in Potomac, Md., surrounded by family. The owner of the Eagles in the 1960s, and an early part-owner of the Flyers, Mr. Wolman was instrumental in the building of the Spectrum and was a key lobbyist in convincing the National Hockey League to award a franchise to Philadelphia.
SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
The fans pelted Santa Claus with snowballs, because the 1968 Eagles stank like the sewers of Manayunk, because an incompetent coach named Joe Kuharich, who couldn't win at Notre Dame, had been given a 15-year contract by the owner, Jerry Wolman. The fans pelted Santa Claus with snowballs because they were fed up with a lousy football team and glitzy halftime shows featuring a 50-piece brass band, because the Eagles were 2-11 at that point, because the two games they'd won after losing the first 11 would cost them the chance to draft O.J. Simpson.
SPORTS
September 9, 2010
THE EAGLES have not won a championship in 50 years. Fifty! Five-ohhhh. Half a century. Four owners, 11 coaches, a covey of quarterbacks, three ball yards, two Super Bowl appearances and a mascot that looks like a partridge in a pear tree. Yogi Berra once said, "When you come to a fork in the road . . . take it!" Is that what the Eagles have done for the last 50 years, come to a fork in the road, picked it up and jabbed it into an eye? Or simply zigged right when they should have zagged left.
SPORTS
June 25, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though time and a bitter feud have obscured his significant role in the sporting history of a city where he nearly lost his fortune and reputation, Jerry Wolman was back at the center of Philadelphia power Thursday. The onetime Eagles owner and Spectrum developer launched his biography, Jerry Wolman: The World's Richest Man , cowritten by Richard and Joseph Bockol, at an afternoon reception in City Hall. Wolman, 83, wrote the book now, he said, because as his grandchildren grew older they grew more curious about his life.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
Re Stan Hochman's piece, "Snider-Wolman Feud": I'd like to comment as I know Jerry Wolman better than most people. I've worked for Jerry for more than 20 years and can assure you that he's not a bitter man, nor does he hold grudges. His only comment over the years about Mr. Snider was, "He is not worth talking about. " Jerry is a kind and compassionate person. He has an interest in everyone, from the janitor in our building to the president of the U.S. Jerry makes everyone feel loved.
SPORTS
March 17, 2009
IN PHILADELPHIA, Ed Snider tells people that the Spectrum is his "baby" and that he will be heartsick when they implode it before the end of the year. In Potomac, Md., Jerry Wolman gnashes his teeth and snarls, "Ed Snider didn't put a dime into the Spectrum. " Whose fingerprints are on the blueprints? Whose DNA is in the design? Can we put the Spectrum on the Maury Povich show and have him yelp at the doomed 41-year-old arena, "Who's your daddy?" Wolman says he borrowed the money to build the Spectrum, picked the architects, hired the construction company that brought the project in ahead of schedule and under budget.
SPORTS
October 5, 2004 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nick Skorich, who took over as head coach of the NFL champion Philadelphia Eagles in 1961 and came within a roughing-the-punter penalty of leading the team back to the title game, died Saturday at Presbyterian Hospital, apparently of an infection after recent heart-valve surgery. He was 83 and lived in Mansfield Township, Burlington County. "He was one of the best," recalled former Eagles cornerback Tom Brookshier, who suffered a career-ending broken leg during Mr. Skorich's first season as head coach.
SPORTS
December 11, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
There was a time in Philadelphia when the name Jerry Wolman was as familiar to Eagles fans as the name Jeff Lurie is now. In fact, the similarities go way beyond their being household names in the city. Like Lurie, when Wolman first bought the team he promised the sun, the moon and a championship, but soon found himself the steward of a horrible football team not unlike the one Lurie now has. And, by the time the name Jerry Wolman was traded in for the name Leonard Tose on the head desk in the Eagles' front office, he was about as popular an owner as Lurie is now. When Wolman sold the Eagles to Tose in 1969 and eventually returned to his home in a Washington suburb, he quietly began rebuilding his fortune while his name faded into obscurity on the city's sports scene.
NEWS
October 11, 1998 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You think this Eagles season is as bad as it gets? You think the team's fans are as angry and frustrated as they've ever been? You have obviously forgotten 1968. Thirty years ago, the Eagles lost their first 11 games and 12 of 14. While they did so, their owner lost his fortune and their embattled coach very nearly lost his curly scalp. "That year was a disaster from start to finish," said Joe Scarpati, a defensive back for the team then. "I've tried to block it out of my mind completely.
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