CollectionsJersey Shore
IN THE NEWS

Jersey Shore

NEWS
August 5, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
"JERSEY SHORE" made a blockbuster trade earlier this year, dumping a group of boorish, bronzed clowns on Europe in exchange for hundreds of studious young men and women, eager to make money and soak up the American experience. We gave the world "Snooki" and "The Situation. " The world gave us Aytac and Olesia. The cast of MTV's "Jersey Shore," according to published reports, didn't have a personal renaissance in Florence. They spent their time racking up fines, beating each other up, and butchering the native tongue while the country collectively referred to the crew as "tamarri," Italian for uncultured or vulgar.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY - It'll probably never surpass Cape May and its environs as the Jersey Shore's birding capital. But a small patch of woods on a coastal islet, where a concrete bridge foundation for part of the Route 52 Causeway was rebuilt two years ago at the resort's main gateway, may just be giving veteran birders a new place to flock. The nesting and the squawking - despite the constant roar of traffic off the nearby causeway - can call to mind explorer Henry Hudson's crew. As soon as the Dutch explorers came ashore in 1609, they started giving everything an embryonic-inspired moniker - such as Great Egg Harbor, Great Egg Bay, Little Egg Inlet - because of the inordinate number of seabird nests and eggs laid out across the marshlands and woodlands as far as the eye could see. Pull in, park your car, and stand for a few minutes on the elevated walkway along stretches on the northern side of the little woods, and you'll likely be able to see at least a half-dozen bird species.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK TOWNSHIP, N.J. - You won't be able to see it when it's finished, because the seawall that extends three and a half miles through two beach towns will be covered in sand and is being rooted 30 feet below sea level. It will act as an invisible barrier against future storms such as Hurricane Sandy along a stretch of the Jersey Shore that was arguably the most devastated by the October 29, 2012, storm that did $38 billion worth of damage in the state. The new steel seawall lines a beach-ward section of Route 35 and runs through Mantoloking and the Normandy Beach section of Brick Township.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller
For runners across the country, it's half- and full-marathon training season. Here in the Philadelphia area, it's also Jersey Shore season, which means we're tossing running shoes and shorts into our duffle bags along with flip-flops and bathing suits. You have a few different running options when you're on a Jersey Shore vacation. Here are the pros and cons of each. Something to keep in mind for all three: The Shore doesn't offer a lot of shade, so make sure to wear sunblock and/or a hat, or get out before or after the sun brings out the sunbathers.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
Jersey Shore residents woke up Sunday to the first glimpse of sunshine in days - but also to flooded roads and sharply eroded beaches. As damage from the weekend's storm came into focus, afternoon high tides sent water surging into the streets in many Ocean County and Cape May County towns. Mike Johnston looked out over the beach from the Ocean City boardwalk near Fifth Street after a bike ride Sunday morning. "It has been getting wiped out," said Johnston, 59, of Magnolia, an estimator for a steel fabrics company.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - When this resort 63 years ago completed the Jersey Shore's first engineered beach-replenishment project, pumping 2.54 million cubic yards of sand onto a two-mile stretch of beachfront at a cost of around $4 million, officials thought it would solve the town's erosion problems for good. But by 1958, it appeared Ocean City - and ultimately its neighbors up and down the coast - would need more beach replenishment. And would have to keep doing it in the ensuing decades.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot and Daily News Staff Writer
Beachgoers at the Jersey shore looked to the sky and found an unpleasant sight Saturday afternoon — but it wasn't seagulls circling or dark storm clouds breaking the sun-soaked summer day. It was two swastikas — one inside a Star of David — flown on a plane-led banner above the beach like an ad for a bar's karaoke night or a restaurant's seafood special. "First I was like, ‘Did I just see what I thought I saw fly by?'? " said Kim Silverman, 54, a Philadelphia woman who was enjoying the waves at Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island around 3 p.m. when she looked up to see the symbol, long associated with the horrors of Nazi Germany, traveling across the blue sky. "I was shocked.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - Ryan Santiago, 20, has been surfing since he was 5. Growing up at the Jersey Shore, he immersed himself in the surfing community and culture. In middle school and high school, he competed in several local and national surfing competitions. His older brother Sean, 22, was also a competitive surfer. In college, Ryan Santiago - a sociology major and Spanish minor - still pursues his passion. He recently returned from his sophomore year at the University of San Diego, where he is a member of the school surf team.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Justin Soulen, the worst part of a long weekend at the Shore with friends was the drive home. Not because of the return traffic or the ending of a vacation, but because of what was traveling home with him in the trunk - bags and bags of hot trash. "It was gross - all the stuff from BBQs, parties," Soulen said. "We just said to ourselves, 'This is ridiculous.' " Because Soulen, 25, and friends would leave Ventnor on a Sunday, and trash day was at midweek, their only choice was to bring the trash home or risk being fined for leaving cans on the street too early.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It all comes down to sand - those tiny particles of rock that form the beaches that draw thousands of tourists and billions of dollars in revenue to the Jersey Shore. And the question before the state Beach Erosion Commission yesterday was how to get more of it onto New Jersey's dwindling coast and how to keep it there. In its presentation at the lengthy public hearing, a representative of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said that studies of various sections of the state's Atlantic coast and Delaware Bay shoreline are either under way or will begin by the end of 1996.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|