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REAL_ESTATE
August 4, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not everyone has a million dollars to buy a fabulous house down the Shore. But don't despair - there's still a sandy place for the rest of us. Just ask Joe and Jane Santo, who last year purchased a $132,000 second home in the Villas, Cape May County. In a decade or so, they may move there full time and make the house their retirement retreat. It helps that it's situated on Spruce Avenue, on the bay side and three blocks from the beach. These days, forecasts of rising sea levels, in addition to the higher prices, taxes, and maintenance costs, are making oceanfront Shore properties less a draw than they might once have been.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want to take a peek inside some palatial beach houses? You'll have your chance on Monday, when the Jewish Family Service of Atlantic and Cape May Counties hosts its 27th annual House Tour. Six luxurious Shore homes, in the upscale Downbeach section of the Jersey Shore which includes the towns of Ventnor, Margate and Longport, are in this year's event. "I think this is something that people wait for all year . . . they come from all over the Shore and from Philadelphia, New York, Cherry Hill and they really make a day of it enjoying themselves going from house to house and then going out for lunch.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BARNEGAT LIGHT - It was like Christmas morning, solving a Rubik's cube, and the movie Groundhog Day all rolled into one as soon as the Grand Larson III docked at Viking Village. A seven-man crew - the maximum allowed under strict government regulation - returned Wednesday from five days on the 80-foot steel-hulled trawler, which had gone to a managed scalloping area called the Delmarva, about 50 miles off the coast of New Jersey, and pulled 12,000 pounds of scallops from the deep.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY - It'll probably never surpass Cape May and its environs as the Jersey Shore's birding capital. But a small patch of woods on a coastal islet, where a concrete bridge foundation for part of the Route 52 Causeway was rebuilt two years ago at the resort's main gateway, may just be giving veteran birders a new place to flock. The nesting and the squawking - despite the constant roar of traffic off the nearby causeway - can call to mind explorer Henry Hudson's crew. As soon as the Dutch explorers came ashore in 1609, they started giving everything an embryonic-inspired moniker - such as Great Egg Harbor, Great Egg Bay, Little Egg Inlet - because of the inordinate number of seabird nests and eggs laid out across the marshlands and woodlands as far as the eye could see. Pull in, park your car, and stand for a few minutes on the elevated walkway along stretches on the northern side of the little woods, and you'll likely be able to see at least a half-dozen bird species.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Justin Soulen, the worst part of a long weekend at the Shore with friends was the drive home. Not because of the return traffic or the ending of a vacation, but because of what was traveling home with him in the trunk - bags and bags of hot trash. "It was gross - all the stuff from BBQs, parties," Soulen said. "We just said to ourselves, 'This is ridiculous.' " Because Soulen, 25, and friends would leave Ventnor on a Sunday, and trash day was at midweek, their only choice was to bring the trash home or risk being fined for leaving cans on the street too early.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. - A two-day drive from home, they came on buses from across the country. They watched as the cornfields of rural America morphed into the lush, deciduous trees separating major East Coast cities. A series of "Welcome to" signs slipped by until their buses came to the end of the line - the Atlantic Ocean, something that many of the volunteers with Lutheran Social Ministries last week had never seen before. They weren't in Nebraska anymore. It was the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A body that washed up at Island Beach State Park in Ocean County could be that of a 25-year-old swimmer who went missing Friday. The Ocean County Sheriff's Office notified the Coast Guard just after 8 a.m. Saturday that a body had been found on the beach in that park, on the north side of Barnegat Inlet. Though the body had not been identified Saturday night, "it was a male and he had on red shorts," Coast Guard Duty Officer Thomas Peck said. That fits the description of Nicholas Guilhote, 25, of France.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yet another round of strong thunderstorms rumbled through the region late Tuesday, just in time for the peak commuting period, and once again they had a particular ferocity in South Jersey. Flash-flood warnings were in effect for parts of Camden and Gloucester Counties, and flood advisories were posted for just about the entire southern half of the state. Hailstones an inch in diameter - about the size of a quarter - were reported in Tabernacle, Burlington County. With rains forecast to continue well into the night, the National Weather Service extended its flash-flood watch for the entire region through 6 a.m. Wednesday.
REAL_ESTATE
July 7, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
One day back in October 2012, Stokes Carrigan and Diane Carter were sitting in their part-time home - a cattle ranch in Mundubbera, Australia - watching television. They were looking at images of a marauder named Sandy wreaking havoc on the Atlantic coast of the United States. Theirs was more than a passing interest: The focus of the report was on their other hometown, Beach Haven, N.J. Carrigan and Carter had moved to Beach Haven in 2009, after years of summering there. They divide their time between Long Beach Island and Carter's native Australia.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Jan Hefler and Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writers
Unseasonably warm ocean temperatures, mostly sunny weekends, and pent-up feelings that linger from the bitter winter have launched a successful start to the summer season at the Jersey Shore. That's the sense many business owners, tourism officials, lifeguards, beach-tag sellers, and Realtors get after assessing the beach crowds that have materialized so far, two years after Sandy. They also expect the July Fourth weekend to continue the good fortune and boost the outlook for the rest of the summer.
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