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NEWS
March 3, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is Friday night in the Holy City, the beginning of the Sabbath. The streets are deserted, the cafes are empty, the buses have all stopped running. But for Ronan Ohana, the night is young and made for boogieing. "I come here to forget everything," said the 19-year-old soldier, who had donned a fashionably slouchy black-and-white checked jacket for the night, as he took a break from dancing in the aisle of a glitzy discotheque in Jerusalem's new nightclub area. "I just want to think about the lights, the music, the girls.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | by Joseph F. Mulligan, For the Daily News
For Christians, visiting Jerusalem, where Christ was crucified and died, was buried and resurrected, is a special Easter gift. As a Catholic pilgrim, I felt blessed to be walking in the footsteps of Christ at almost every turn in this city's narrow byways. While there for five days, we stayed in an excellent guest house inside the ancient walls of the Old City; a short stroll to the holiest site in Christendom, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. According to the New Testament, Holy Week began in the Upper Room (now over the tomb of David)
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Julie Pace and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - President Obama personally intervened to order Democrats to change language in their party platform to add a mention of God and declare that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, campaign officials said Wednesday. Democrats abruptly changed the platform Wednesday evening to reinstate language from the 2008 platform that said "we need a government that stands up for the hopes, values and interests of working people and gives everyone willing to work hard the chance to make the most of their God-given potential.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Akiva Eldar
I had the dubious pleasure last week of listening to politicians from Kansas, New York, Montana and Georgia wax poetic at the Capitol Rotunda about a city that for most of them is another distant spot on the map, a place not quite safe enough for a family visit at Christmas. They were talking about Jerusalem. Before the ink was dry on the bill that requires the American Embassy to be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt and Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan were competing for credit for this "birthday present" to Jerusalem to mark its 3,000th anniversary - a date which, incidentally, has no credible historical basis.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
Among the peoples of the world, diplomatic relations are the traditional sign of friendship. It goes beyond recognizing each other: it specifies mutual rights and duties that each must observe toward the other. It is like a contract. When two sovereign powers are openly hostile to each other, they break off diplomatic relations as the prelude to war. The Vatican State in Rome is not only the capital of world Catholicism, it is a separate sovereign state in its own right. As such, it establishes diplomatic relations with other sovereign states and carefully protects the rights of Catholics in such countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Police Detective David Bar-Lev has been called the best detective in Jerusalem by his boss, Rafi, which is why the latter assigns the former to what appears to be the city's first serial-murder case in Pattern Crimes by William Bayer (Signet, $4.95). The first body to be found is that of an attractive young Jewish prostitute with distinctive marks on her face: "Her cheeks were marked, two shallow vertical slashes across each, cut quickly, David thought, like a pair of bars . . . " The body of a young American nun is discovered next, similarly cut. Then an Arab boy. An older man. David and his colleagues pursue the smallest of clues, which brings them to the 6-year-old witness of a traffic accident also seen by some of the victims.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | by Akiva Eldar, New York Times
Thirteen embassies abandoned Jerusalem 15 years ago as a result of a law that proclaimed the city Israel's eternal, undivided capital. Thus, this legislation, championed by right-wing politicians, backfired as many predicted, weakening Jerusalem's status as Israel's legitimate capital. Today, an unholy alliance between the same right-wing Israeli politicians and vote-seeking American politicians is cynically manipulating the emotionally charged issue of Jerusalem. No wonder that this week Bob Dole, the Senate majority leader and front- runner for the Republican presidential nomination, and Newt Gingrich, speaker of the House, introduced legislation calling for the transfer of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lisa Tremper Barnes gazes at the small, sand-colored object in the display case, and has visions of flames shooting skyward and men being put to the sword and women dragged off by the fierce invaders. You can read about it in the Old Testament Book of Jeremiah - the terrible events of the year 586 B.C., when . . . In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem, and besieged it. Here, in an exhibition at the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville, you can see the physical evidence of those frightful days, and the centuries before and after.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Claudia Capos, Special to The Inquirer
Some would call it a miracle. Others might insist that it is simply another revolution of the ever-turning wheel of history in a city that has been invaded, destroyed and rebuilt time and time again. Still others would chalk it up to smart business sense and an ambitious effort to bolster Israel's tourist trade. But most would agree that the extensive rebuilding of Jerusalem's old Jewish Quarter, now nearing completion after 18 years, is nothing short of remarkable - a modern-day ruins-to-riches story.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By CHAIM POTOK
As James Joyce embodies Dublin, and Franz Kafka Prague, so has Teddy Kollek come to personify the city of Jerusalem. And now comes the news that he has lost the race for the mayoralty of that city. Jerusalem without Kollek? He has been its mayor for 28 years. It's hard to imagine the city without him. I lived in Jerusalem from the fall of the 1963 to the summer of 1964. It seemed a small, provincial hill town perched at the end of a winding two-lane mountain road at the head of which was the throbbing metropolis of Tel Aviv.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kimye, heal Israel   Now that they have tended to the needs of the Armenian people, Kim Kardashian and Kanye West have taken their traveling EgoFest to Israel, perhaps to unite Jews and Muslims through the loving bond of reality TV. Monday, the couple and their kin, Khloé , attended the Armenian church, Saint James Cathedral, in Jerusalem's Old City for the baptism of Kimye's daughter, North West . Not all was picture-perfect:...
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The life of a touring ensemble is one in which most essential decisions are made well in advance. What music is played, and where, at the Jerusalem Quartet's Thursday concert for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the American Philosophical Society, was determined at least a year ago. And being one of the best of its kind, the string quartet played its Mozart/Bártok/Schumann concert with the commitment and artistry one has come to expect...
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
While Shiites and Sunnis kill each other in Syria, an even more dangerous religious war could soon explode in Jerusalem, involving Jews, Muslims, and Christians. I refer to the mounting Israeli-Arab tensions over control of the Temple Mount, or Haram al-Sharif, as Muslims call it, in Jerusalem's Old City, which is Judaism's holiest site and the third holiest for Islam. "The Temple Mount is a powder keg, and arsonists have the upper hand," blared a Wednesday headline in the Israeli newspaper Ha'aretz.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKEWOOD, N.J. - A death in Jerusalem left a painful void here Thursday, with residents of this Ocean County town grappling with the news that a young man who grew up among them had perished in Israel while on religious studies there. Aaron Sofer, 23, was reported missing last Friday while hiking in the woods, prompting a massive search. A body was found Wednesday evening, and officials on Thursday confirmed it was his. Sofer appeared to have died of natural causes, Lakewood's deputy mayor, Albert Akerman, said Thursday afternoon, citing conversations with Israeli police.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
A young Orthodox Jewish man from Lakewood, N.J., is the object of a massive search in Israel after he went missing Friday while hiking in woods outside Jerusalem. Aaron Sofer, 23, was hiking in the Beit Sayit area with a friend when they became separated while climbing down a steep hill, the Jerusalem Post reported. Israeli officials say they cannot rule out that Sofer, a yeshiva student who was wearing a yarmulke and other clothing identifying him as Jewish, might have been kidnapped.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Eti Cohen's telephone rings these days, it is often her sister calling in tears from Israel, with air-raid sirens wailing in the background. Cohen, owner of the Center City restaurant Hamifgash, was born in Jerusalem. Her sister Mazi, 47, lives near Tel Aviv. "This needs to be over," said Cohen, speaking of the Palestinian rockets that have rained on Israel by the hundreds this week, and Israel's numerous air strikes on Gaza. "People are afraid. " Bareeq Albarqawi, 26, of Somerset, N.J., a Palestinian American whose parents are from two villages near Nablus, said the violence affects her, too, because her aunt and extended family live in that West Bank city.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Jerusalem Quartet is widely considered one of the best of its generation, but the solidity of its playing and interpretive intelligence was barely half the story at Thursday's well-received Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert. More than in the past, the quartet revealed a stronger, more specific, more evolved personality at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater: While some quartets are a bristling alliance of four strong-minded soloists, the Jerusalem is the ultimate ensemble with a central aesthetic.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reuven Reich is in town to cure cancer. More specifically, the Dame Susan Garth Professor of Cancer Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is looking for collaborators and funding to develop drugs to attack ovarian and breast cancer and melanoma, particularly in children. "They are very common cancers in children," Reich said Monday, "and very serious. " The researcher is among 24 Israeli scientists and medical researchers here for a three-day seminar arranged by Drexel University, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Hebrew University.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
TEL AVIV - Mayor Nutter's whirlwind 10-day trade trip to London and this city came to an end Monday with an announced collaboration among Drexel University, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, as well as the possibility of a similar mission to Philadelphia by Israeli entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. The partnership of Drexel, Children's, and Hebrew University had been set in motion prior to Nutter's trip, but the discussed visit to Philadelphia by Israeli entities arose serendipitously during a meeting Sunday of the Philadelphia delegation and Israeli start-ups organized by Pitango Venture Capital group in Herzliya, a suburb of Tel Aviv.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | BY MICHAEL RUSSELL, russelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
WANT TO know what the young Jewish movers and shakers of the world are up to? Ask Philly's own Jared Jackson, back in town after an invitation-only international summit this summer in Jerusalem. Jackson was among 150 representatives from 37 countries - including young Jews from India, China, Sweden, Rwanda, Moldova, New Zealand and Colombia - attending a five-day idea-swapping session in Israel this June. There alongside him was Debbie Danon from London's Three Faiths Forum, a group founded to encourage dialogue among Christians, Muslims and Jews.
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