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Jesse Owens

SPORTS
April 27, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Shadows always are dancing on the old brick walls of Franklin Field during the Penn Relays. If you look closely enough, you can see the reflection of Jesse Owens' 220-yard leg for Ohio State in the sprint medley in 1936, and Larry James' anchor leg in the mile relay for Villanova in 1968, and Usain Bolt's half-human/half-hovercraft performance for Jamaica's 4x100 relay on that sunny Saturday afternoon in 2010. But there isn't a wall wide enough to contain the legacy of Dr. LeRoy Walker.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just a few blocks from the 13-year-old Franklin Field, where the young black man with the long stride had become one of Philadelphia's best-known athletes, a great crowd gathered outside his parents' house at 3323 Woodland Ave. Later on that chilled December day in 1908, a long procession of horse-drawn carriages and a few motor cars headed west to Collingdale's Eden Cemetery, where John Baxter Taylor was mourned thoroughly, eulogized grandly, and...
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Icabod Flewellen's East Cleveland house is a maze of ordinary cartons and cabinets overflowing with extraordinary treasures - rare photographs of Jesse Owens and Josephine Baker, first edition books by such black writers as Zora Neale Hurston, reams of documents and clippings about the accomplishments of black people. Two back rooms in the Rev. DeGrandval Burke's Charlotte, N.C., home hold what amounts to the only complete pictorial and written account of the city's historic black neighborhood, destroyed during urban renewal of the 1960s.
SPORTS
April 22, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
The Tuppeny boys walked, lunch bags in hand, from their home in Sharon Hill, hopped the No. 11 trolley and didn't budge until it squeaked to a stop outside the old Horn & Hardart's cafeteria at 40th Street. The seven-block walk to Franklin Field seemed like seven baby steps that morning in 1935. Jimmy Tuppeny, age 9, was heading to his first Penn Relays. "The first thing I remember seeing was a guy throwing the hammer," Tuppeny said. "We were walking to Franklin Field, and there they were on the other side of the fence.
SPORTS
April 22, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
The Tuppeny boys walked, lunch bags in hand, from their home in Sharon Hill, hopped the No. 11 trolley, and didn't budge until it squeaked to a stop outside the old Horn & Hardart's cafeteria at 40th Street. The seven-block walk to Franklin Field seemed like seven baby steps that morning in 1935. Jimmy Tuppeny, age 9, was heading to his first Penn Relays. "The first thing I remember seeing was a guy throwing the hammer," Tuppeny said. "We were walking to Franklin Field, and there they were on the other side of the fence.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By ACEL MOORE
At a reception prior to the 10th annual Jesse Owens International Trophy Award banquet last week at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, I marveled as I watched and listened to the light banter among the several hundred invited guests. The room was filled with some of the world's most famous athletes who came to pay tribute to this year's winner of the Owens award, given since 1981 to the amateur athlete who most exemplifies the qualities exhibited by Jesse Owens during his lifetime.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | By Ed Kracz, Special to The Inquirer
Next Sunday represents the first step in what could lead to an all- expenses-paid trip to California. Of course, there are a few requirements that need to be met first. You must have some track ability. And - here's where it gets tricky - you must be between the ages of 7 and 14. If you meet those criteria, or know someone that does, then show up at 1 p.m. Sunday at Chichester High School. The event is one of several local track meets being held in the Philadelphia area as part of the 25th anniversary of the Jesse Owens Games, sponsored by Arco Chemical Co. The winners of the local meets will then move on to a regional meet July 7 at Franklin Field.
SPORTS
January 19, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Lance Armstrong, who overcame testicular cancer and captured the Tour de France last year, won the 2000 Jesse Owens International Trophy Award. In balloting by an international panel, Armstrong received 90 votes, the International Amateur Athletic Association announced yesterday. Maurice Greene, who set the world 100-meter record and won three gold medals at the World Track and Field Championships last year, was second with 59 votes. Third with 55 votes was Morocco's Hicham el Guerrouj, who set the world mile record in 1999.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Taking her stand, Amy Campbell concentrated on the distance ahead of her and began her run. Hitting her mark, she jumped from the red clay track and was airborne for a few seconds before landing in the soft sand. The first of several practice runs, it did not match her best long jump of 15 feet, 7 inches, but it still felt good. "I've been running track since I was in third grade, and it's the sport I like the best," said Campbell, 14, who will be a freshman at Cardinal O'Hara High School in the fall.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The statue, capturing the great runner in stride, will grace a hill overlooking a verdant slope with a museum, ball fields and an oval track. When the park is completed and the statue installed, they will make a fine memorial. For many here, the memorial - which follows years of struggle and news that the Olympic torch will pass through - is long overdue. Jesse Owens. It might seem an obvious gesture to honor him here. Into this tiny community of stifling poverty and cotton fields was born a boy who would challenge the wind, who would expose as fool's gold the genetic theories of a dictator and in the doing, bring his country an unprecedented haul of Olympic gold.
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