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Jesse Owens

NEWS
April 25, 1993
The action on Franklin Field at the 99th Penn Relays, one of the nation's premier amateur track-and-field events, captivates thousands who attend and hundreds of thousands more who watch on television. But another spectacular takes place in the bleachers, where African American collegians, alumni and just plain folks, dressed in their best, network and party - many without ever noticing the runners, sprinters and hurdlers. The Relays are, of course, a multicultural extravanganza.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clifton B.B. Thaw, 73, an athlete and engineer, died Monday at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. A speed-skating champion and sprinter who competed against Jesse Owens before the 1936 Olympics, Mr. Thaw became an engineer after graduating from West Philadelphia High School and the University of Michigan. He started in the purchasing department of the Baldwin Locomotive Works in the mid-1940s and founded his own company, C.B. Thaw Inc., in 1951. The firm represented three maufacturers of steel tubing, a major manufacturer of steel rings for aircraft engines, and producers of heat exchangers and liquid loading arms, used to unload oil from ships.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
BOXER Floyd Mayweather Jr. must perform 40 hours of community service after he angered a federal judge in South Carolina who learned Mayweather was actually in a nightclub on the day he was supposed to give a deposition and not resting up from injuries he sustained in a fight, as he had claimed. Mayweather must help the Las Vegas Habitat for Humanity Project by the end of January or face further penalties, U.S. District Judge Joseph F. Anderson Jr. ruled. Mayweather, along with his production company and World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. are being sued by Anthony Dash, who accused the boxer of stealing a beat he created in 2005 for a song Mayweather used as he entered the ring at wrestling events in 2008 and 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2016
Valentine's Day @ the PFS Roxy Noon to 10:15 p.m. Sunday at the PFS at the Roxy Bring some beer or a bottle of wine for a BYO party featuring a daylong program of films about love in all its shades, including Rob Reiner's divine fantasy, The Princess Bride (rated PG; at noon); the deliciously dangerous noir Double Indemnity (no MPAA rating; 2:10 p.m.), Romeo + Juliet featuring the young Leonardo DiCaprio (PG-13; 4:30 p.m.), and James Cameron's Titanic , pairing Leo with Kate Winslet (PG-13; 7 p.m.)
SPORTS
November 13, 2012 | Daily News staff and wire reports
FOUR-TIME NASCAR champion Jeff Gordon avoided suspension Monday when NASCAR instead fined him $100,000 and docked him 25 points for intentionally wrecking Clint Bowyer at Phoenix International Raceway. Gordon also was placed on probation through Dec. 31. But he will be allowed to close out the season at Homestead-Miami Speedway despite his actions in Sunday's race, which triggered a fight in the garage area between the two drivers' crews. "I take responsibility for my actions on the racetrack," Gordon said in a statement.
NEWS
July 16, 2008 | By LARRY ATKINS
WE ALL know the stories of Olympic heroes like Jim Thorpe, Carl Lewis, Rafer Johnson, Mary Lou Retton and Mark Spitz - great athletes who took advantage of their opportunity to perform on the world stage and win gold medals. But for every story of Olympic glory there are many more of those who were denied the chance to shine on the world stage. During the 1930s and '40s, Eulace Peacock was one of the world's great sprinters and long-jumpers. While competing for Temple's track team, he won the AAU 100 meter dash in 1935, defeating a field that included future track Hall of Famers Jesse Owens and Ralph Metcalf.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Larry Atkins
We all know the stories of Olympic heroes such as Jim Thorpe, Rafer Johnson, Carl Lewis and Marion Jones - great athletes who took advantage of their opportunity to perform on the world stage and win gold medals. Marty Glickman never got that chance. Glickman, who died last week at the age of 83, was a member of the United States track team who was removed from the 400-meter relay at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. It wasn't a hamstring or food poisoning that kept Glickman from running.
SPORTS
November 2, 2007 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
John Woodruff, who joined Jesse Owens as black Americans who won gold medals in the face of Adolf Hitler and his "master race" agenda at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, has died at an assisted-living center near Phoenix. Woodruff died Tuesday at a center in Fountain Hills, Ariz., said Rose Woodruff, his wife of 37 years. He was 92. Woodruff, nicknamed "Long John" for his lengthy stride, was a lanky 21-year-old freshman at Pittsburgh in 1936. On Aug. 4, 1936, he won the 800 meters using one of the most astonishing tactics in Olympic history.
SPORTS
November 19, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Golf great Seve Ballesteros was released from intensive care in Madrid, Spain, following brain surgery on a malignant tumor. The 51-year-old Spaniard will remain in the hospital to continue rehabilitation following three operations in 18 days. Madrid's La Paz hospital said the healing process is slow and there was no timetable for his release. Restricted visits are being allowed for the first time. Ballesteros underwent a 6 1/2-hour operation Oct. 24 to remove the tumor and reduce swelling around the brain.
SPORTS
August 17, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Tyson Gay wasn't the only U.S. track and field athlete to have a terribly disappointing day. American men failed yesterday to advance to the finals of the discus and, amazingly enough, the long jump. In that event - dominated for decades by such U.S. stars as Jesse Owens, Ralph Boston, Bob Beamon, Arnie Robinson and Carl Lewis - the best a U.S. jumper could do was Trevell Quinley's leap of 25 feet, 9 3/4 inches, good only for 19th place. Brian Johnson was 22d and Miguel Pate 38th.
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