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Jesse Owens

SPORTS
November 9, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
BOXER Floyd Mayweather Jr. must perform 40 hours of community service after he angered a federal judge in South Carolina who learned Mayweather was actually in a nightclub on the day he was supposed to give a deposition and not resting up from injuries he sustained in a fight, as he had claimed. Mayweather must help the Las Vegas Habitat for Humanity Project by the end of January or face further penalties, U.S. District Judge Joseph F. Anderson Jr. ruled. Mayweather, along with his production company and World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. are being sued by Anthony Dash, who accused the boxer of stealing a beat he created in 2005 for a song Mayweather used as he entered the ring at wrestling events in 2008 and 2009.
NEWS
July 16, 2008 | By LARRY ATKINS
WE ALL know the stories of Olympic heroes like Jim Thorpe, Carl Lewis, Rafer Johnson, Mary Lou Retton and Mark Spitz - great athletes who took advantage of their opportunity to perform on the world stage and win gold medals. But for every story of Olympic glory there are many more of those who were denied the chance to shine on the world stage. During the 1930s and '40s, Eulace Peacock was one of the world's great sprinters and long-jumpers. While competing for Temple's track team, he won the AAU 100 meter dash in 1935, defeating a field that included future track Hall of Famers Jesse Owens and Ralph Metcalf.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Larry Atkins
We all know the stories of Olympic heroes such as Jim Thorpe, Rafer Johnson, Carl Lewis and Marion Jones - great athletes who took advantage of their opportunity to perform on the world stage and win gold medals. Marty Glickman never got that chance. Glickman, who died last week at the age of 83, was a member of the United States track team who was removed from the 400-meter relay at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. It wasn't a hamstring or food poisoning that kept Glickman from running.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When did the modern fitness movement begin? With Teddy Roosevelt? Charles Atlas? Jack LaLanne? Dwight D. Eisenhower? John F. Kennedy? Frank Shorter? Bill Rodgers? Arthur Jones? Jane Fonda? Hard to say, exactly. Much depends on your definition of modern . Here's another name worth considering that you probably don't recognize - Will Wilkinson. The Aston, Delaware County, inventor has been called "the father of step aerobics," which launched a craze and, by his lights, sparked the fitness revolution, 25 years ago this year.
SPORTS
November 2, 2007 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
John Woodruff, who joined Jesse Owens as black Americans who won gold medals in the face of Adolf Hitler and his "master race" agenda at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, has died at an assisted-living center near Phoenix. Woodruff died Tuesday at a center in Fountain Hills, Ariz., said Rose Woodruff, his wife of 37 years. He was 92. Woodruff, nicknamed "Long John" for his lengthy stride, was a lanky 21-year-old freshman at Pittsburgh in 1936. On Aug. 4, 1936, he won the 800 meters using one of the most astonishing tactics in Olympic history.
SPORTS
November 19, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Golf great Seve Ballesteros was released from intensive care in Madrid, Spain, following brain surgery on a malignant tumor. The 51-year-old Spaniard will remain in the hospital to continue rehabilitation following three operations in 18 days. Madrid's La Paz hospital said the healing process is slow and there was no timetable for his release. Restricted visits are being allowed for the first time. Ballesteros underwent a 6 1/2-hour operation Oct. 24 to remove the tumor and reduce swelling around the brain.
SPORTS
August 17, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Tyson Gay wasn't the only U.S. track and field athlete to have a terribly disappointing day. American men failed yesterday to advance to the finals of the discus and, amazingly enough, the long jump. In that event - dominated for decades by such U.S. stars as Jesse Owens, Ralph Boston, Bob Beamon, Arnie Robinson and Carl Lewis - the best a U.S. jumper could do was Trevell Quinley's leap of 25 feet, 9 3/4 inches, good only for 19th place. Brian Johnson was 22d and Miguel Pate 38th.
SPORTS
August 23, 2009 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Usain Bolt's third gold medal of the world championships failed to produce a third world record because the Jamaican 400-meter relay team only managed to produce the second-fastest time in history. "It is a little bit my fault," an apologetic Bolt said, complaining he was just too tired after nine races in eight days. "I didn't run the best third leg. I was happy to get around the track and give the baton to Asafa," he said. "I am dying right now. " Compounding Bolt's fatigue was Asafa Powell's groin injury, which made the anchor runner uncertain until one hour before the start.
SPORTS
November 30, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
The Salt Lake City Games will cost $1.9 billion, six times the cost of those in Lake Placid in 1980, the last Winter Olympics in the United States. Taxpayers will pay 18 percent of the cost, or $342 million, nearly twice as much money as they did in 1980, according to a General Accounting Office report released yesterday. That does not include an estimated $50 million to be spent on additional security following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Most of the money for the Feb. 8-24 event - $1.3 billion - has been raised by the organizing committee.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ethel Roeger Schmuhl, 86, a psychologist, staunch supporter of Beaver College, and former resident of Elkins Park, died Tuesday at Florida Hospital Waterman in Eustis, Fla. Mrs. Schmuhl worked with children for much of her 50-year career. From 1941 to 1964, she conducted private psychological testing of children in the Philadelphia area. She then worked for the Jenkintown School District until retiring in 1984. Mrs. Schmuhl was born in Philadelphia, where she graduated from high school.
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