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Jesse Owens

NEWS
February 27, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Icabod Flewellen's East Cleveland house is a maze of ordinary cartons and cabinets overflowing with extraordinary treasures - rare photographs of Jesse Owens and Josephine Baker, first edition books by such black writers as Zora Neale Hurston, reams of documents and clippings about the accomplishments of black people. Two back rooms in the Rev. DeGrandval Burke's Charlotte, N.C., home hold what amounts to the only complete pictorial and written account of the city's historic black neighborhood, destroyed during urban renewal of the 1960s.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the Chicago Tribune and the Washington Post
Beverly Owens Prather, daughter of Olympic legend Jesse Owens, was fined $5,000 and placed on three years probation Tuesday in Chicago after pleading guilty to taking $550 in bribes in her job as an aide in the city controller's office. Prather, 52, took the money from a city vendor in exchange for speeding up $20,000 worth of city payments to the company. Said federal judge George Marovich: "You have not brought honor to (your name). That is something you will have to live with. " MORE FAMOUS CHILDREN Newlyweds Andrew Cuomo and Kerry Kennedy Cuomo will set up housekeeping in renovated digs in Douglaston, N.Y., a posh section of Queens.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By ACEL MOORE
At a reception prior to the 10th annual Jesse Owens International Trophy Award banquet last week at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, I marveled as I watched and listened to the light banter among the several hundred invited guests. The room was filled with some of the world's most famous athletes who came to pay tribute to this year's winner of the Owens award, given since 1981 to the amateur athlete who most exemplifies the qualities exhibited by Jesse Owens during his lifetime.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his first year in track, Christian Schorle, 10, won a gold medal at the East Coast Cross Country Classic in Raleigh, N.C. This year the boy who "eats and sleeps track" did so well that he qualified for the ARCO Jesse Owens Games East Coast Regional Championship on July 8. But because of an error on his entrance form, an error that the Jesse Owens people said should have been picked up by an area coordinator, Christian will not be going to...
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | By Ed Kracz, Special to The Inquirer
Next Sunday represents the first step in what could lead to an all- expenses-paid trip to California. Of course, there are a few requirements that need to be met first. You must have some track ability. And - here's where it gets tricky - you must be between the ages of 7 and 14. If you meet those criteria, or know someone that does, then show up at 1 p.m. Sunday at Chichester High School. The event is one of several local track meets being held in the Philadelphia area as part of the 25th anniversary of the Jesse Owens Games, sponsored by Arco Chemical Co. The winners of the local meets will then move on to a regional meet July 7 at Franklin Field.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By ACEL MOORE
Though Jesse Jackson has amazed me many times with his oratorical skills, his speech Monday night in accepting the Robie Humanitarian Award from the Jackie Robinson Foundation at its annual banquet in New York City was special. In it Jackson referred to the late Sugar Ray Robinson as the "last of the four horsemen. " The "four horsemen" of my father's generation, of course, were the members of the 1924 Notre Dame football team's backfield: Jim Crowley, Elmer Layden, Don Miller and Harry Stuhldreher.
SPORTS
May 1, 1988 | By Joe Bisicchia, Special to The Inquirer
He was at this year's Penn Relays as he had been at so many before, once as a world-class sprinter and jumper. Now he is the chief official of the long- jump and triple-jump competitions, and at age 73, he says he wants to start working out again. Eulace Peacock never quits. For the former Temple runner, who has his portrait hanging in McGonigle Hall as a charter member of the university's Hall of Fame, the Penn Relays are something that cannot be forgotten, not so much for the eight medals he won there but for the greatest disappointment of an otherwise brilliant career.
SPORTS
April 17, 1988 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a mix of pride, hope and anxiety, Evelyn Lewis probably will go to the Olympics this year, once more to cheer for her son and daughter. There remains the matter of qualifying competition, of course, but barring the unexpected, the mother of Carl and Carol Lewis firmly expects to relive the emotional ordeal she knew in the Los Angeles Games of 1984. Carl's 1984 victories - in the 100 and 200 meters, the long jump and the 400-meter relay - made him the Summer Olympics' first quadruple gold medalist since Jesse Owens in 1936.
SPORTS
April 22, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
The Tuppeny boys walked, lunch bags in hand, from their home in Sharon Hill, hopped the No. 11 trolley and didn't budge until it squeaked to a stop outside the old Horn & Hardart's cafeteria at 40th Street. The seven-block walk to Franklin Field seemed like seven baby steps that morning in 1935. Jimmy Tuppeny, age 9, was heading to his first Penn Relays. "The first thing I remember seeing was a guy throwing the hammer," Tuppeny said. "We were walking to Franklin Field, and there they were on the other side of the fence.
SPORTS
April 22, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
The Tuppeny boys walked, lunch bags in hand, from their home in Sharon Hill, hopped the No. 11 trolley, and didn't budge until it squeaked to a stop outside the old Horn & Hardart's cafeteria at 40th Street. The seven-block walk to Franklin Field seemed like seven baby steps that morning in 1935. Jimmy Tuppeny, age 9, was heading to his first Penn Relays. "The first thing I remember seeing was a guy throwing the hammer," Tuppeny said. "We were walking to Franklin Field, and there they were on the other side of the fence.
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