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NEWS
November 19, 1991
It has been one step forward, two steps back in El Salvador, of late. Which is to say that some things never change. Last week, the guerrillas of the left declared a unilateral cease-fire, saying they wanted to encourage the latest round of United Nations-brokered peace talks in Mexico. President Alfredo Cristiani called it, with qualifications, a good-will gesture. Then, factions of the rightist military denounced the whole thing as empty, false and "propagandistic. " And the army moved more troops into position on the flanks of a guerrilla-held volcano over the weekend.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John J. Scanlan, 75, who taught the theology of marriage at St. Joseph's University for nearly 20 years and performed so many wedding ceremonies for his students he was known as "Marrying Sam," died Monday at the Loyola Center Infirmary at Saint Joseph's. "He did a lot of personal counseling and was much loved by the students," said the Rev. Donald Clifford, a professor of theology at St. Joseph's. At St. Joe's, he taught in the evening college where the students were a little older than regular students, Father Clifford said.
NEWS
December 7, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
St. Joseph's University officials yesterday said their desire to boost the school's financial resources and its regional presence led them to name a Jesuit with extensive fund-raising experience to be the school's 26th president. In a welcoming ceremony, the Rev. Timothy R. Lannon, 52, said that he had not intended to be a candidate for the job, but that he changed his mind after visiting the City Avenue campus last summer and meeting students. "The students hooked me," Father Lannon said.
SPORTS
December 16, 1994 | By Sally Pollak, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roman Catholic escaped with a 61-60 victory against Dallas' Jesuit Prep last night in the opening round of the Gonzaga/D.C. Classic at Gonzaga College High School. The win, against an inspired and disciplined team, set up Roman's game at 6:45 tonight at American University against DeMatha, the No. 1 team in the nation. DeMatha romped over Washington's Coolidge High, 94-67, in its opening-round game of the eight-team tourney. Roman's victory hung in the balance until the buzzer sounded and Johnathan Howard's three-point attempt fell short for Jesuit.
NEWS
February 8, 2011
The Rev. Joseph F. Monaghan, 89, chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital in North Philadelphia from 1979 to 2010, died of heart failure Saturday, Jan. 29, at Manresa Hall in Merion Station. Father Monaghan, a Jesuit, was a parish priest at the Church of the Gesu in North Philadelphia from 1967 to 1978 and then minister to the Jesuit community at St. Joseph's Preparatory School before beginning his career as a hospital chaplain. Born in Cincinnati, he graduated from St. Joseph's Prep and as a 17-year-old entered the Jesuit religious order in August 1939.
NEWS
January 31, 2007 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling the allegations against a former Saint Joseph's University campus minister "deeply disturbing," university president Timothy R. Lannon alerted the campus community yesterday to an investigation of the Rev. H. Cornell Bradley, a Jesuit priest who worked at the campus for more than a decade before leaving last year. The investigation is conducted by the Maryland Province Society of Jesus, a Jesuit governing body, which found that Bradley had engaged in "sexual misconduct with an adult male during the early 1980s" and cited four other alleged incidents involving minors and adults over three decades.
NEWS
August 2, 2006 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"What's going on at the Prep?" That's the question parents, teachers, students and alumni of St. Joseph's Preparatory School have been asking this summer about the private school in North Philadelphia. The Prep had a tumultuous 2005-06 academic year that included a cheating scandal and the midyear resignations of several teachers. Then, in mid-June, the Rev. Bruce M. Bidinger, the president who had been laying the groundwork for a $30 million capital campaign, abruptly resigned as of July 7. His sudden departure after four years put the prestigious Jesuit boys' school in the unusual position of replacing its two top administrators at once.
NEWS
July 11, 2010
William R. Callahan, 78, a Roman Catholic priest and self-described "impossible dreamer" whose determined opposition to Vatican policies prompted Jesuit officials to expel him from their order, died Monday in Washington. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said the Quixote Center, an organization that Dr. Callahan helped found to press for changes in the church and society. It is independent of the church and based in Brentwood, Md. He lived there. Born in Scituate, Mass.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Helen Delano hugs the Rev. Stephen Jones outside the federal courthouse in Center City yesterday as Roman Catholic, American Baptist, United Methodist and Presbyterian clergy and nuns protest U.S. military aid to El Salvador and worship in memory of the Nov. 16 Jesuit university slayings. The Rev. David Kuh of St. Luke's Snyder Avenue United Methodist Church said 16 protesters were arrested at noon as they knelt to block the entrance to the courthouse and each drew a fine of $25.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Michael Kavanagh, 82, a Jesuit who fought social ills in the United States and leprosy in India over the course of more than 50 years, died Thursday at St. Joseph's University Jesuit Community of complications of cancer and congestive heart failure. Father Kavanagh was known to his friends as "Father Mike. " He was born in Rochester, N.Y., and entered the Society of Jesus in 1928 at St. Andrew-on- Hudson, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He was ordained in 1941 at Woodstock College in Maryland.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 15, 2013 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - The Saint Joseph's men's basketball team watched an Oscar-winning movie on the way up to Brooklyn on Wednesday afternoon. Their eyes were on "Argo," but most of their ears were listening to the news on the radio. St. Joe's is a Jesuit university and when the white smoke billowed from the Vatican chimney, cell phones aboard the bus started blowing up. "I was getting all sorts of text messages," said the Rev. Bruce Bidinger, the Hawks' team chaplain. "Phil [coach Martelli]
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
DURING HIS years as archbishop of Buenos Aires, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio rode a packed, grimy city bus to work - a symbol of his drive to stay rooted in his Jesuit humility and devotion to Argentina's poor. But Thursday morning, the 76-year-old woke up with the Popemobile at his powerful command as Francis - the first pontiff from the Americas, the first Jesuit, and spiritual leader to more than 1.2 billion Roman Catholics. Most experts expect that Pope Francis will steer the Vatican down the center of the sharply divided highway that is modern Catholicism - veering left, for example, on economic issues such as income inequality before swerving to the right on hot-button social issues, such as opposing female priests and both marriage and adoption by gays.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
A JESUIT POPE who takes the name of St. Francis. The soldier of Christ meets the gentle servant who asked the Lord to make him "a channel for peace. " Habemus Papam, we have a pope. And a gentle warrior for the church is born. As I watched the former Jorge Bergoglio at the red-draped balcony, at least two things occurred to me: He was humble and resolute. In some ways, Francis appears to be a synthesis of his two immediate predecessors, the charismatic soldier John Paul II and the unassuming contemplative Benedict XVI. This, I think, is what we need now, even as we struggle to understand which road will take us to the redemptive glory that we deserve as both a church and a people.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - From "the end of the earth," the Catholic Church found a surprising new leader Wednesday, a pioneer pope from Argentina who took the name Francis, a pastor rather than a manager to resurrect a church and faith in crisis. He is the first pontiff from the New World and the first non-European since the Middle Ages. Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, 76, the archbishop of Buenos Aires who has spent nearly his entire career in Argentina, was a fast and fitting choice for the most unpredictable papal succession - start to finish - in at least six centuries.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - While the Vatican has picked the highly disciplined Jesuits as advance men for planning papal pilgrimages and to run its worldwide broadcasting network, the notion of a Jesuit pope is still being absorbed in the Holy See. Before Pope Francis, no one from the nearly 500-year-old missionary order had been pope. Previous popes have punished Jesuit theologians for being too progressive in preaching and teaching. The last pontiff, Benedict XVI, sent a polite but firm letter inviting the order's worldwide members to pledge "total adhesion" to Catholic doctrine, including on divorce, homosexuality, and liberation theology.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Maria Travaglio wept with joy when news came that a Latino had been chosen as pope. "It's about time," said the Philadelphia Archdiocese Catholic Social Services worker, who born and raised in Argentina. "I can't believe it. Wow. " Travaglio was crying tears of happiness in the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia, where she and others gathered to watch the announcement. Across the Philadelphia region, Catholics rejoiced and non-Catholics took notice, the world seeming to stop for a moment for the selection of a new pope: Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Bergoglio.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Jesuits have told the Philadelphia district attorney that they received a credible allegation that one of their priests had inappropriate physical contact with a student at St. Joseph's Preparatory School in North Philadelphia in the 1970s. The Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus said Tuesday that a former St. Joe's Prep student reported that the Rev. Stephen M. Garrity - a graduate of the school - engaged in inappropriate sexual touching while teaching at the school from 1971 to 1979.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By St. John Barned-Smith, FOR THE INQUIRER
ASUNCION, Paraguay — On a map of South America, Paraguay looks a little like the tucked-away footnote, no mountains or ocean coastline. But over my last two years as a Peace Corps volunteer, I've discovered a wealth of delights along the country's southeastern border. So when my parents came to visit me on a break from the hustle and bustle of the Northeast, I decided to show them some of the startling vistas of nature, signs of man's grand engineering, and spots of soothing tranquillity that Paraguay has to offer.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
In an attempt to squeeze in some exercise, I took a brisk lunchtime walk down Broad Street recently. A few blocks into it, I was reminded of one of my pet peeves about Philadelphia. At least once a block, some man - it's always a man - cleared his throat, launching a mound of gelatinous phlegm onto the sidewalk. I've seen men open car doors to spit, or just spit through the open windows. As a Midwesterner who has lived in the South and West, I'm repulsed anew each winter.
SPORTS
June 1, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's probably not too surprising that a Catholic order conceived in the aftermath of battle, one which has always seasoned its intellectual and spiritual fervor with a healthy respect for physical strength, has become the principal force behind the growth of American rugby. So many Jesuit high schools and colleges are playing and succeeding at the rugged and increasingly popular sport that it seems as if the 477-year-old religious order, founded by a converted Spanish soldier, Ignatius of Loyola, has added rugby devotion to its vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
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