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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jesus of Nazareth was not a religious prophet with a message of peace and universal love - much less the Son of God. He was a revolutionary, a Jewish resistance fighter who worked to overthrow Israel's Roman rulers. So writes comparative religionist Reza Aslan in Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth , which he will discuss at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. (A limited number of tickets are still available.) As radical as this may sound, Aslan's theory is hardly new or particularly revolutionary.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
Orlando R. Barone is a writer in Doylestown Catholics notoriously know nothing about Bibles, and I was a good Catholic. I'd heard little snippets at Mass, but I never read anything out of an actual Bible until, at age 18, I decided to try it. I did realize that the stuff about Jesus was in the New Testament, so I flipped through the preliminary material and eventually got to the Four Gospels. Great. I would read one of those. I saw right away that Matthew and Luke were out of the question - too long.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying America is so mired in "moral depravity" that only a mass appeal to the Almighty can save it, Christian evangelical leaders from across the country are planning a giant prayer rally for Sept. 29 in Philadelphia. The "America for Jesus" daylong gathering on Independence Mall is expected to draw at least 30,000 people who "want to turn the nation around," said Bishop Anne Giminez, chairwoman of the event and pastor of Rock Pentecostal Church in Virginia Beach, Va. "We see the symptoms of decline all around us," she said Wednesday, citing murder and abortion rates and the decline of marriage.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature. " - Mark 16:15 Jesus didn't need an advertising agency. The Bible says that when He showed up alive after Easter to His amazed disciples, all Jesus did was urge them to go out and preach. And lo, nearly 2,000 years later, the word is still moving in the land. So are the automobiles. Thousands of them daily, and what they are passing as they head north on Interstate 95 past Cottman Avenue is a giant billboard advertisement that reads in bold letters: "Jesus hated church, too. " Underneath, in smaller type, but still visible from the highway is the tagline: "But he never used it as an excuse to not worship.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
If Jesus Christ returned one day, would anyone recognize him? Would he have a job? Would he live in a house or an apartment? City or suburbs? These are the types of questions that inspired the writing of a book called "Joshua" (Collier Books, $8.95) by Joseph F. Girzone, a retired priest. The book is about a man who moves into a cottage on the outskirts of a small, tightly knit town where everyone knows everyone else by first name and gossip is treated as something to be savored and served in a group of no less than three people.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
As you enter the Manhattan Theatre Club's main-stage theater, having passed through metal detectors in the lobby, the actors in Terrence McNally's Corpus Christi are milling about in street clothes, chatting with the audience and one another. A large staff pounded on the floor signals the start of the play, and one performer separates himself from the others to tell us what we are about to see. "We are going to tell you an old and familiar story," he says. ". . . No tricks up our sleeves, no malice in our hearts.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comedy vet Jackie Mason, 75, has filed a $2 mil lawsuit against Jews for Jesus for using his name and image in one of the org's pamphlets. Filed in New York state Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit seeks the destruction of the pamphlet, which has an image of Mason next to the words "Jackie Mason . . . A Jew for Jesus!?" The pamphlet, which plays with Mason's shoulder-shrugging question-asking shtick, expounds on the similarities between Judaism and Christianity. "While I have the utmost respect for people who practice the Christian faith . . . I am as Jewish as a matzo ball or kosher salami," Mason said.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Hundreds of Christians streamed through the cobblestone alleyways of Jerusalem's Old City on Friday, hoisting wooden crosses and chanting prayers to mark the crucifixion of Jesus. Throngs of pilgrims walked a traditional Good Friday procession that retraces Jesus' steps along the Via Dolorosa, Latin for the "Way of Suffering. " They followed his 14 stations, saying a prayer at each and ending at the ancient Holy Sepulcher church. Along the route, Franciscan friars in brown robes chanted prayers in Latin and explained the different stations to crowds through a megaphone.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
The live TV musical trend takes a new direction this weekend as Fox marks Christians' Palm Sunday with The Passion , a two-hour retelling of the Easter story. This time, it takes place in New Orleans and stars Jencarlos Canela, a Cuban American singer and star of NBC's Telenovela , as Jesus. What can we expect when it airs at 8 p.m.? Here's what we know so far: 1. Though the Lenten tradition of the Passion Play goes back many centuries, the format for Fox's version comes from the Netherlands, the country that also gave the world Big Brother . Each year since 2011, the story of Jesus' death and resurrection has been reenacted three days before Easter in a different Dutch city, broadcast live, accompanied by pop-music performances.
NEWS
March 22, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly past noon yesterday, the Rev. Jay Broadnax surveyed the congregation inside St. Matthew A.M.E. Church in West Philadelphia and whispered: "Lord, we want to remember the words you spoke on the cross. " "Amen," they responded. And so began the Good Friday service known as the Seven Last Words of Christ, as celebrated by seven African Methodist Episcopal preachers before 300 people in attendance. At some churches, this traditional Protestant look at the final phrases (not merely seven words)
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