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Jet Fuel

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BUSINESS
December 31, 2011 | By Chris Kahn, Associated Press
For the first time, the top export of the United States, the biggest gas guzzler in the world, is - wait for it - fuel. Measured in dollars, the country is on pace this year to ship more gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel than any other single export, according to U.S. census data going back to 1990. It will also be the first year in more than 60 that America has been a net exporter of these fuels. A decade ago, fuel was not even among the top 25 exports. And for the last five years, America's top export was aircraft.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
U.S. oil companies are gouging the airlines with high prices for jet fuel while limiting the rise in consumer gasoline prices to bolster their public image, an airline industry group charged yesterday. The high jet-fuel costs are accelerating the cutbacks and asset sales that are reshaping the nation's airlines and, if they continue, could result in a total restructuring of the industry, said Robert J. Aaronson, president of the Air Transport Association of America. In recent days, Midway Airlines has announced that it is phasing out its Philadelphia hub operations and selling its gates and other assets to rival USAir, and Pan Am Corp.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2012 | By Linda Loyd and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Workers are returning to the former ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer, to begin steps toward resuming fuel production in September, a move that new owner Delta Air Lines hopes can cut its jet-fuel bill by $300 million a year. A Delta subsidiary, Monroe Energy L.L.C., closed on the $180 million purchase of the idled oil refinery on June 22. Three days later, the first workers arrived to begin a turnaround, which is a maintenance procedure, and to modify some units and do routine inspections.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
The Air Force has acknowledged in a report that 67,500 liters of jet fuel leaked from a tank at the Willow Grove Air Reserve station during the 1960s and 1970s. That fuel contained five toxic compounds, and if the area isn't cleaned up, the fuel eventually could make its way into the drinking-water supply, according to the report filed with the federal Environmental Protection Agency. But there is no threat to health at this time, said Pat Liebman, a civilian in charge of public affairs at the base.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
Twelve homes in Burlington Township were evacuated yesterday morning when a road crew ripped a hole in an underground fuel line, spewing more than 12,000 gallons of combustible jet fuel onto the street. No one was injured in the incident, but all the roads in the area were closed as workers tried to contain the leak and fire crews prepared hoses in case of an explosion. It all started about 10 a.m. yesterday when workers from the Burlington County Highway Department were digging a trench to install lines for a traffic light at Jacksonville, Fountain and Old York Roads.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
It wasn't the impact of the hijacked 767 jets that flattened the World Trade Center towers Tuesday. It was the inferno of burning jet fuel that dealt the monoliths their fatal blow. Although engineers disagree on the details, most now believe that the two 110-story towers behaved just as the buildings' architects and engineers had promised: They stood up to a direct hit from a large airliner. What they could not handle was an unprecedented, kerosene-fueled fireball with temperatures that ranged from 3,600 to 4,000 degrees.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There are times when the jet engines shake their house and rattle their dishes, but Gervin and Millie Jones would not have it any other way. The couple moved into their home in neighboring Upper Moreland 48 years ago, just after the Willow Grove Naval Air Station opened. Since then, the low-flying planes traveling to and from the base have provided backyard entertainment. But last weekend, the Joneses left the comfort of their porch with a few friends and joined about 200,000 spectators at the air station's Sound of Freedom show, a two-day event featuring aeronautic performances, demonstration airplanes and other attractions.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The jet fuel spill caused by the rupture of an underground pipeline Thursday night did not pose much of a health threat to humans or wildlife, officials said yesterday. But it has hampered those wanting to travel on one of the township's most-used roadways. Today may be the seventh day that a quarter-mile portion of Jacksonville Road, from Fountain Avenue to Little Oxmead Road, has had at least one lane closed to allow workers to decontaminate ground soil and the waters of a small nearby stream.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
US Airways Group Inc. yesterday reported a larger-than-expected first-quarter loss, the result of a doubling of its bill for jet fuel, January snowstorms, and a fractious dispute with its flight attendants, the airline said. US Airways, the region's dominant carrier and the employer of more than 5,000 people at Philadelphia International Airport, said it had a $139 million operating loss, or $1.72 a share. Analysts had expected a loss of $1.48 a share, according to First Call, which tracks analysts' earnings estimates.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Yana Ginburg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT The Associated Press contributed to this article
An underground pipeline running between a Delaware River dock and McGuire Air Force Base ruptured yesterday morning, spilling more than 10,000 gallons of jet fuel into a Burlington County Creek and other surrounding waterways and land. About 25 residents of the sparsely-populated area were evacuated from their homes - near a tributary of the Assiscunk Creek - after the spill was reported at about 8 a.m. State officials said evacuations were ordered because the evaporating fuel could cause nausea.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Thursday that its Trainer oil refinery in Delaware County produced a $19 million profit in the third quarter, and is expected to have a $20 million profit in the current fourth quarter. Delta, the first U.S. airline to report earnings, had Thanksgiving revenues up by 8 percent, and Christmas and New Year's bookings "look solid," company president Edward Bastian reported on a conference call. Management said it has seen no change in booking trends due to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that its Trainer oil refinery in Delaware County produced a $13 million profit in the second quarter. Delta, the first U.S. airline to report earnings, posted a second-quarter profit of $889 million, or $1.04 a share, that beat analysts' estimates, driven by strong passenger demand and higher revenue from corporate contracts. Revenue rose 9.4 percent to $10.6 billion. "We will post even better results in the third quarter, with a forecast operating margin of 15 percent to 17 percent," Delta chief executive officer Richard Anderson said on a conference call.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines, which bought the former ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer, Delaware County, to secure a steady source of discounted jet fuel, said Wednesday the refinery lost $41 million in the first quarter but is expected to be profitable in the current June quarter. Delta said one major crude unit at the refinery was shut down for scheduled modifications, which decreased production. To bring Trainer to profitability in 2014, Delta is making infrastructure changes to increase refined production, and boost jet and diesel production to roughly 50 percent of the refinery's total output, Delta chief financial officer Paul Jacobson said during a conference call.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Tuesday that its Trainer oil refinery in Delaware County would have a "small loss" in the current first quarter, after posting a loss of $46 million in the three months ended Dec. 31 and a $116 million loss for 2013. Delta executives said on a conference call that the 180,000-barrel-a-day refinery, operated by subsidiary Monroe Energy L.L.C., would "see a modest profit" for 2014, said chief financial officer Paul Jacobson. "We expect to see only a modest loss for the Trainer refinery in the March quarter, despite the pull-down of one of the main units for modifications," Jacobson told investors.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines, which bought the former ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer, Delaware County, to secure a steady source of discounted jet fuel, said Wednesday the refinery lost $100,000 in 2013, but is expected to be profitable next year. Although some analysts had expressed skepticism about an airline diversifying into oil refining, a capital-intensive business with low margins, Delta president Edward Bastian told investors Wednesday: "Let me be very clear. Trainer has been a great success for Delta.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Tuesday its refinery in Trainer, Delaware County, posted a $3 million profit for the three months ended Sept. 30. It was the first quarterly profit since Delta bought the former ConocoPhillips refinery last year to supply itself with jet fuel. "We have a tremendous opportunity with the Trainer refinery," Delta CEO Richard Anderson told investors on a conference call discussing third-quarter financial results. "Importantly, the refinery's production has proven to be effective in keeping jet cracks in check, particularly in the New York harbor.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shares of Delta Air Lines and US Airways Group rose Wednesday after the airlines reported second-quarter earnings that exceeded analysts' estimates, on lower jet fuel costs and improved passenger demand. Delta shares closed up 1.71 percent to $20.80, while US Airways added 2.49 percent to $18.50. Saying this would be its last earnings call as a stand-alone company before the merger with American Airlines, US Airways president Scott Kirby noted, "We had a great run here at US Airways.
TRAVEL
April 22, 2013 | By Peter Mandel, For The Inquirer
I'll bet that flying means to you roughly what it does to me: battling seat pockets that eat knee space. Emptying your inner life into plastic trays. Far above the clouds, another, better world exists: It's a paradise of infinite legroom and no one around to pat you down preflight. In fact, as a passenger in a private jet, you call the shots, even when it comes to buckling seatbelts. Celebrities and Romney-class politicians know this well. And so do I - since a business-owning pal let me fly aboard a JetSuite Embraer Phenom 100 from Providence, R.I., to New York.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
We heard a lot four years ago about how quick and massive intervention by the U.S. and European governments kept the financial system from collapsing. But lenders who lost billions financing dumb property speculation, and were bailed out by public investments, are still having to cope with the government conditions that kept them in business. It's one reason the economy remains slow. For example, the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) has been resisting pressure to sell its U.S. arm, including Citizens Bank , to raise badly needed cash.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group Inc. and Delta Air Lines posted higher quarterly profits Wednesday and said the revenue environment ahead looks fairly good. US Airways, which is in talks with bankrupt American Airlines about a potential merger, said third-quarter profit more than doubled to $192 million, or 98 cents a share, from $95 million, or 51 cents a share, a year earlier. That beat analysts' average estimates of 92 cents. "That's our second-best third-quarter profit in company history," US Airways chief executive Doug Parker said during a call with investors.
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