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Jewish Community Center

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NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Speakers ranging from Dr. Ruth to a former Israeli secret agent will visit Cherry Hill as the Jewish Community Center of Southern New Jersey sponsors its first Community Festival of Arts, Books and Culture from Nov. 2 through 8. "November is traditionally Jewish book month," said Maris Kobb, director of adult services at the Jewish Community Center (JCC), and many synagogues and Jewish centers throughout the country observe the event with special book- related programs and sales.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a little seed money and her knack for organizing, Kathy Elias is helping to found the Chester County Jewish Community Center Without Walls. "Building a community center takes millions of dollars," said Elias, who is the organization's community director. "Instead of waiting for one to be built, we chose a different beginning. " Instead of just one address, the center will use buildings all over the county: synagogues, libraries, retirement communities, businesses and schools.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What once had been the subject of rancorous debate and legal challenges came to an anti-climactic end Monday: The township's planning board approved site plans for a Jewish Community Center at Springdale and Kresson Roads and nobody showed up to complain. The nonchalance was a far cry from the days of yore, when strong community opposition prompted 450 families to donate money to keep the Jewish Federation and its $20 million complex out of their neighborhood. The neighbors went to court twice and spent more than $50,000 to stop construction of the center and a five-story senior-citizen apartment building.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just two months after opening its doors, the new Jewish Community Center here has found its membership growing so quickly and unexpectedly that the board is scrambling to open up new categories and expand the old ones to accommodate the interest. "Everything is so beautiful, so state-of-the-art, who wouldn't want to come here?" said Lillian Sclaroff, 86, from Cherry Hill. There are about 6,000 other members who apparently agree with her. At those levels - which are close to twice what the membership used to be at the old center on Route 70 - the center on Springdale and Kresson has only 500 slots left before it will reach limits set by its leadership, said membership director David Friedman.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While a military color guard stood watch over the 1954 groundbreaking for the first Jewish Community Center here, Superior Court Judge Sidney Goldman of Trenton compared the moment to the day in 1654 when 23 Dutch Jews fleeing Brazil arrived in the American colonies. At a ceremony this morning, Mayor Susan Bass Levin's remarks will likely be invested with somewhat less gravity when she formally begins the destruction of that beige brick building and ushers in plans for a 200-unit luxury apartment and townhouse complex called - perhaps ironically - Bishop's View.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Festival of Arts, Books and Culture was born nine years ago, it featured 10 entertainers, and it hasn't stopped growing. This year, more than 40 prominent people will lecture, play music, tell jokes, offer advice, teach, and entertain at the annual weeklong festival, which begins next Sunday at the Betty and Milton Katz Jewish Community Center on Springdale Road. More than 10,000 people are expected to attend, said festival coordinator Harriett Kirsh Pozen. "It's just grown by leaps and bounds," Pozen said.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | For The Inquirer / SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL
In the petting zoo, Sarah Turtz, 6, gives a hand to her 16-month-old sister, Hannah. The zoo was among the activities yesterday at the Jewish Community Center of Southern New Jersey's Purim Festival in Cherry Hill.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In a swelling tide of tinsel and Bing Crosby, Hanukkah sometimes seems like a mesh bag of gold foil-wrapped afterthought. Yet the very theme of the Festival of Lights is survival, and the panoply of options for Hanukkah activities in the region demonstrates that this holiday refuses to go quietly into the fake snowy night. Here are some ways to keep the lights burning: Lighting ceremonies. Re-creating those flames that wouldn't quit, lighting ceremonies abound on the eve of the holiday on Tuesday - at sundown at Suburban Square, 6 Coulter Ave., Ardmore (information: 610-896-7560, suburbansquare.com)
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
DAVID TUCK has plenty of Holocaust horror stories. Although nearly 70 years have passed since he staggered out of the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria, the memories remain as fresh as a wound slow to scab. Memories of things like the cemeteries where he was forced to loot the jewelry from corpses and dig gold fillings from their rotting mouths to give to his Nazi guards. Or how he dodged death by swearing, in German, his loyalty to the "Fatherland" after he got caught hiding a slice of bread.
FOOD
July 27, 2012 | By Laura Lippstone, For The Inquirer
A New York-style Jewish deli in Amish country with a kitchen under the meticulous supervision of a born-again Christian? No, it's not a reality show. Welcome to Mort's New York Style Delicatessen in Lancaster. A growing number of urban Jews have been settling in bucolic Lancaster County over the last several years, lured by the wholesome charm and the proximity to Philadelphia and New York. So many, in fact, that Lancaster has three synagogues and a Jewish community center. What it didn't have, in this place where most Zimmermans and Kaufmans are not Jewish, was a place to get a decent nosh.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louise Selleck Greenbaum, 89, of West Hartford, Conn., who was a teacher in Cherry Hill, died of complications from a heart ailment on Sunday, June 24, at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Conn. Mrs. Greenbaum lived from 1960 to 2010 in Cherry Hill, where her husband, Maurice, was executive director of the Jewish Community Center of Camden County for a time, according to the couple's daughter, Beth Bernstein. "She did what she called 'bedside teaching,' " which meant tutoring homebound students, Bernstein said.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot and Daily News Staff Writer
Beachgoers at the Jersey Shore looked to the sky and found an unpleasant sight Saturday afternoon — but it wasn't circling seagulls or dark storm clouds breaking the sun-soaked summer day. It was a swastika, flown on a plane-led banner above the beach like an ad for a bar's karaoke night or a restaurant's seafood special. "First I was like, ‘Did I just see what I thought I saw fly by?'" said Kim Silverman, 54, a Philadelphia woman who was enjoying the waves at Long Beach Island around 3 p.m. when she looked up to see the symbol, long associated with the horrors perpetuated in Nazi Germany, traveling across the blue sky above.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012
Theater 11th Annual Solo Flights Festival Features five solo artists & two ensemble companies. Closes 3/25. Mill Hill Playhouse, 205 E. Front St., Trenton; 609-392-0766. $20. 1812 Productions: Let's Pretend We're Famous New comedy cabaret featuring Jennifer Childs & Tony Braithwaite. Closes 3/25. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey Pl.; Reservations required: 215-735-0630 or 1-800-595-4849. 1812productions.org. $28-$36. A Reptile Dysfunction Musical comedy.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Authorities leveled additional charges Friday against a teenager accused in the firebombings of two North Jersey synagogues, saying he had plotted a similar attack on a Jewish community center and had conducted Internet searches for building Molotov cocktails and instructions on blowing up buildings. Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli said investigators found multiple Molotov cocktails last week in a wooded area near the Jewish Community Center of Paramus, and they traced the evidence to a foiled attack they said suspect Anthony Graziano had planned for Jan. 7. Graziano, 19, was charged Friday with aggravated arson, bias intimidation, and other charges for the planned attack on the Paramus center.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Authorities leveled additional charges Friday against a teenager accused in the firebombings of two North Jersey synagogues, saying he had plotted a similar attack on a Jewish community center and had conducted Internet searches for building Molotov cocktails and instructions on blowing up buildings. Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli said investigators found multiple Molotov cocktails this week in a wooded area near the Jewish Community Center of Paramus, and they traced the evidence to a foiled attack they said suspect Anthony Graziano had planned for Jan. 7. Graziano, 19, was charged Friday with aggravated arson, bias intimidation, and other charges for the planned attack on the Paramus center.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Karen Zraick and Verena Dobnik, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The developer of an Islamic cultural center that opened Wednesday evening near the site of the terrorist attacks that leveled the World Trade Center says the biggest error on the project was not involving the families of 9/11 victims from the start. People crowded into the center, where a small orchestra played traditional Middle Eastern instruments and a photo exhibit of New York children of different ethnicities lined the walls. The enthusiasm at the opening belied its troubled beginnings.
NEWS
November 24, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ramon Brier Garfinkel, 85, of Rittenhouse Square, a real estate developer and community activist, died of heart failure Saturday, Nov. 13, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. As president of Eldon Construction Co., Mr. Garfinkel built more than 1,000 housing units in Northeast Philadelphia and in the Pennsylvania and New Jersey suburbs. His projects included the residential communities of Mullica Hill Farms and Whitemarsh Farms in New Jersey, and condo complexes in Cinnaminson and in the Art Museum area in Philadelphia.
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