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NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
The Jewish Federation of Camden County is planning to move to better serve Jewish families in Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties. Last month, the federation purchased a 17-acre tract on the northeast corner of Springdale and Kresson Roads in Cherry Hill, which will be the site of a Jewish community-services complex, said Stuart Alpern, executive director of the federation. The federation's complex on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, which likely will be sold when the new facility is finished, has been home for the last 31 years to a number of agencies, including the Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family Service, Jewish Community Relations Council, Bureau of Jewish Education, Bequest and Endowment Fund, The Voice and federation administrative offices.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Five local high school students have been named as the first recipients of Israel Educational Travel Grants by the Chester County Region Board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia. They are Ilyssa Rothman of Temple Brith Achim, King of Prussia; Rachel Zimet of Beth Israel, Uwchlan; Lauren Eisner of Congregation B'nai Jacob, Phoenixville; and Joshua Gold and David Ari Hulnick of Kesher Israel, West Chester. The awards will be given tomorrow evening at the Desmond Hotel in Malvern.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you got a phone call yesterday from the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia asking for money to help with social service programs here and abroad, the pleasant voice on the other end could have belonged to someone like Cindy Green. "We're raising money for those who can't," said Green, a physician from Yardley who was making calls in her 10th phone campaign for the Jewish Federation. This is the 17th annual fund-raising phone campaign for the federation, and this year's theme, "Super Sunday 50," celebrates Israel's 50th anniversary.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Jeremy Kalmanofsky, Special to The Inquirer
A Cherry Hill citizens' group has filed its second lawsuit to block the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey from building a community center and senior citizens' housing complex on the township's east side. The suit seeks to overturn the township's rezoning of the federation's 18- acre site at Springdale and Kresson Roads, which was needed to permit the project. The Township Council unanimously voted to rezone the lot during a stormy meeting in November, when more than 500 residents jammed a ballroom at the Cherry Hill Inn. The citizens' group, known as Save Our Community, contends that the $20 million complex - made up of a community center and a five-story, 100-unit apartment building - would be incongruous with the neighborhood's residential character.
NEWS
August 19, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harold Shpeen, 87, of Marlton, a longtime dentist and former president of the Jewish Federation of South Jersey, died Tuesday, Aug. 17, at his home. When Mariam Shpeen Feist was growing up, she thought her father was employed by the federation and the Jewish Community Centers of Southern New Jersey. After all, Dr. Shpeen would sometimes host meetings at his home, and everything he did revolved around the federation. "It wasn't until later that I realized my father was a dentist," Feist said with a laugh.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The developers of the proposed Jewish Community Center last night got the new institutional zoning they had requested, but failed to win the Cherry Hill Planning Board's approval for a six-story building as part of the plan. The Planning Board last night rezoned a 17-acre site on Springdale and Kresson Roads from residential to institutional, despite much criticism from neighbors who said the proposed campus for the Jewish Federation of South Jersey would dramatically change the residential character of the community.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The good news is, they don't call on Friday nights. But if someone in your household is Jewish, you might soon be asked to give up 15 minutes of dinner (or that Seinfeld rerun) to talk about how you live. The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia - the largest Jewish philanthropic and social-service agency serving Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania suburbs - is conducting its first demographic survey of the area's Jewish population in 13 years. The study seeks to create a snapshot of the area's Jewish population so the federation can better allocate services, according to Alan Molod, chairman of the organization's population study committee.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The vice president of the United States has the image of being just a tad wooden. But Wednesday night, he charmed the packed house with a series of "Al Gore jokes" at Har Zion Temple in Penn Valley. "Last time I was here I was on crutches," he said. "I broke my Achilles tendon playing basketball. I'm fine now although they tell me I'll have to continue to wear the full-body cast. " His humor, however, did not overshadow the more serious issues he wanted to address as the keynote speaker at the 93d Annual Banquet of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three synagogues and the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey have launched a campaign to raise money to build a house for needy residents in Camden. Construction on the home, to be called Shalom House, is scheduled to begin this fall under the auspices of the Metropolitan Camden chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Congregation M'kor Shalom and Temple Emanuel, both in Cherry Hill, and Congregation Adath Emanu-El in Mount Laurel have joined the Jewish Federation in an effort to raise $50,000, the projected cost of building a two-story twin home on Benson Street near the waterfront.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A gift of land to the Jewish Federation of New Jersey could be turning into a mixed blessing. The Federation is pursuing plans for a townhouse complex for 12 developmentally disabled adults on a vacant parcel of land behind the Ellisburg Shopping Center. But some Erlton North residents, concerned about safety, traffic and the quality of life for themselves and those who would live in the complex, are gearing up for a fight. Rite Aid Corp. of Harrisburg, Pa., owns the property, but it was donated by a third, unnamed, party who has partial ownership, said Richard Goldstein, the Federation's project attorney.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph S. Snyder, 91, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer, volunteer worker for Jewish charities, and master storyteller, died Monday, April 7, of congestive heart failure at his home. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Mr. Snyder graduated from Pennsylvania State University and, in 1948, the Dickinson Law School. He served as an Army weatherman in Reykjavik, Iceland, during World War II. Mr. Snyder worked in Harrisburg as a deputy attorney general from 1949 to 1963, when he was invited to join the Philadelphia law firm Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Informed care ABC News correspondent Amy Robach's recent courageous decision to undergo mastectomy and breast reconstruction highlights an important shift in our national dialogue on breast cancer. In addition to screening and prevention, we are now experiencing much-needed discussion about healing and survival, with the empowerment of women from diagnosis to recovery at the heart of this conversation. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons emphasizes that breast cancer care includes, at minimum, a surgeon, oncologist, plastic surgeon, radiologist, and gynecologist.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time a study was done on the Jewish population in South Jersey was 1991. That survey led to increased services for children and adults with special needs, and the development of a senior living center for older Jewish residents, Lions Gate, in Voorhees. A survey now underway attempts to provide real data - not just anecdotes - on where the local Jewish population lives, prays, how they marry, and what services they need most. "The [Jewish] population has changed in 22 years," said Debbie Ret, 50, of Franklin Township, Gloucester County, president of Congregation B'nai Tikvah-Beth Israel in Sewell.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
Selma Kron, 81, a former Horsham resident who with her husband built a foundering business in Ambler into a successful nursing home, died Sunday, Jan. 13, in Clearwater, Fla., where she had lived since the 1990s. She was diagnosed in April with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mrs. Kron graduated from West Philadelphia High School, then graduated with a bachelor's degree in education from the University of Pennsylvania in 1953.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Kaiserman, 73, of Philadelphia, a prominent real estate developer known for his passionate support of Israel, Ethiopian Jewry, and the performing arts, died Sunday, Aug. 19, of complications from colon cancer at a New York hospice. As president and chief executive officer of Kaiserman Co., which was founded by his father, Kevy K. Kaiserman, in the 1920s, Mr. Kaiserman amassed and managed a portfolio that spread over four million square feet of commercial property, including such landmarks as the Bourse, Constitution Place, and the 25-story Rittenhouse Claridge apartment building on Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Marc Rosenstein had left Philadelphia for a life in Israel when he was inspired to make his own contribution to Middle East peace. He founded a circus. In Rosenstein's version, there is no big top, no stilt-walking ringmaster, but there are somersaults, airborne twirls, and juggling acts, all performed by a troupe of Jewish and Arab teens. "I was looking for a cultural bridge," said Rosenstein, 65. The circus "is about overcoming fear, about trust; it's not language-dependent, and it makes people smile.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Smukler, 84, a Philadelphia lawyer and philanthropist who was instrumental in helping Jews emigrate from the Soviet Union, died Friday, July 13, of heart failure at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Smukler was a partner at Fox Rothschild. A longtime civic leader, he served as a past chairman of the board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia, vice president of the National Museum of American Jewish History, and vice chairman of the Anti-Defamation League.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
At the Jewish Genealogical Fair in Cherry Hill, I listen to different voices tell the same story. "I want to find my grandfather. …" "She came here in 1916. …" "He changed his name. …" To the last comment, Steve Schecter, vice president of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia, offers a ready observation. "They all changed their names," says the Mount Laurel retiree, 66, whose paternal grandfather came to America from what is now Belarus, shucking his Schullriekter surname along the way. The old names were back on Sunday at Temple Beth Shalom, as 150 people queried representatives of public archives, such as the Camden County Historical Society, and private organizations, including the Jewish Federation of Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem Counties.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HERE'S HOW to ward off a curse, or overcome triskaidekaphobia (fear of the No. 13), courtesy of Abe S. Rosen: Walk over a bed of peanut shells on Friday the 13th, reciting the phrase, "Anyone who does this is absolutely nutty. " When he would send this advice to columnists on a Friday the 13th, Abe didn't hide the fact that his public-relations agency represented Edwards-Freeman Nut Co. in Conshohocken. It was part of Abe's skill in the grand tradition of the old-time press agents who would stop at very little to plug a client.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first Philadelphia delegation to the JCC Maccabi Games, the international sports competition for Jewish teenagers, was put together in a few weeks with a few phone calls. Phil Kohler, a swim coach at the Kaiserman Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Wynnewood, and his wife, Beth, scrambled to find athletes. They managed to recruit 35 to swim and to play soccer and basketball at the Detroit games in 1984. Twenty-seven years later, 250 teens representing Philadelphia will march into the Pavilion at Villanova University for the opening ceremony of the 2011 JCC Maccabi Games, which will be held here Aug. 14 to 19. The local delegation will be among more than 1,000 athletes from around the world.
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