CollectionsJewish History
IN THE NEWS

Jewish History

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
April 3, 2011 | Associated Press
SHANGHAI - Not far from the Bund district, with its hordes of tourists and view of the city's famous skyscrapers across the Huangpu River, is a quiet neighborhood called Hongkou. Walk here along Zhoushan Road and you'll stumble on a sign that designates an otherwise unremarkable building at No. 59 as a landmark. "During the World War II, a number of Jewish refugees lived in this house, among whom is Michael Blumenthal, the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury of the Carter Government," the sign reads in imperfect English.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A trove of ancient manuscripts in Hebrew characters rescued from caves in a Taliban stronghold in northern Afghanistan is providing the first physical evidence of a Jewish community that thrived there a thousand years ago. On Thursday, Israel's National Library unveiled the cache of recently purchased documents that run the gamut of life experiences, including biblical commentaries, personal letters, and financial records. Researchers say the "Afghan Genizah" marks the greatest such archive found since the "Cairo Genizah" was discovered in an Egyptian synagogue more than 100 years ago, a vast depository of medieval manuscripts considered to be among the most valuable collections of historical documents ever found.
LIVING
December 12, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Great balls of fire! Who would have guessed that Jerry Lee Lewis would be the inspiration behind such a weighty tome as In Search of American Jewish Culture (Brandeis/New England, $26)? But he was, says author Stephen J. Whitfield, who recalled in a recent interview how he had been "chatting with a student several years ago who was wearing a kippah skullcap and who wanted to write a paper on Jerry Lee Lewis. The discrepancy between so observant a Jew being enthusiastic about Southern rock and roll of an era long before he was born made me intrigued by how easy it is to reconcile being Jewish and being American.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Selected items from the comic-book collection of Steven Bergson, as well as the work of contemporary Jewish cartoon artists, are on display now through July 31 at Temple Judea Museum of Keneseth Israel, 8339 Old York Rd., Elkins Park. The exhibition looks at how cartooning has been used to explore Jewish history, tradition and fantasy, museum curator Rita Poley said. Some of the works are controversial, "as comic art is usually over the top and lacking in subtlety," she said. The items from the Bergson collection include comics about intermarriage, golems, biblical and literary characters, the Holocaust and Israel.
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
1492. Has there been a more explosive time in Europe? It's the year when Christopher Columbus set sail. Yet it's also the year when the adventurer's royal sponsors let the Inquisition run amok in Spain. And the year when that nation, which for decades was the home of an extraordinary renaissance of Jewish and Arabic learning and art, expelled the Jews. (Not long after, the Muslims were expelled, too.) These events are woven into a beautiful tapestry in Pennsylvania author Mitchell James Kaplan's debut novel, By Fire, By Water , which has been chosen as the region's annual One Book, One Jewish Community selection.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | By Patrick D. Hazard, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
For European Jewry, 1492 is not a year worth remembering only for Columbus' discovery of America, under the aegis of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain. For them, that was the year those same monarchs decreed that the Jews of Spain must either convert to Catholicism or leave. It was the beginning of the European Diaspora, which would culminate in the horror of the Holocaust 450 years later. Transfer a few numbers, and you get 1942 - also a year of bitter memories, the time of the odious Wannsee Konferenz, during which Hitler and his men plotted, in a lakeside villa near Berlin, the final solution to the "Jewish problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1997 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the place's convoluted name, the twin epigraphs that greet visitors entering the new Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust hint at the complexity of its undertaking. "Remember . . . Never forget," says the first, from Deuteronomy. "There is hope for your future," counters the second, from Jeremiah. Just as telling as the dual epigraphs - an exhortation to recollect past injuries paired with the promise of better times ahead - is their source.
NEWS
July 24, 2002 | Daily News Staff and Wire Report
Chaim Potok, the onetime rabbi who wrote "The Chosen" and other critically acclaimed novels about Jewish life, died yesterday in his home in Merion, Montgomery County. He was 73. Potok, who suffered from brain cancer, had recently been dictating a new novel to his wife, Adena, the family said. His novels often illustrate the conflict between spiritual and secular worlds. "The Chosen," published in 1967 and Potok's first and best-known novel, follows the friendship between two Jewish boys from different religious backgrounds.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Jewish community is like a jelly doughnut to Rabbi David Klatzker, the new leader of Beth Tikvah-B'nai Jeshurun in Erdenheim. "It's flaky on the edges," Klatzker said. "There are a number of people who are not committed. " "But as you get closer to the center, there's a lot of good stuff," he said. "There are a number of people who are deeply committed, and those people give me hope, give me the strength to carry on. " Klatzker, 37, began full-time duties this week at the synagogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1992 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's apt, if sadly so, that photographs of cemeteries should play such a central role in a new exhibition at the National Museum of Jewish History. The horrors of mass death, along with the preservation of memory and the responsibilities of the survivor, are inescapable themes of 20th-century Jewish history. But the Gratz College-sponsored show, "From Salonika to Curacao: A Sephardic Odyssey," also takes us back to a time when cemeteries connoted not extinction, but rootedness, tradition and communal ties.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016
ISSUE | JEWISH IDENTITY Holocaust lives in today's anti-Semitism I share columnist Charles Krauthammer's concern that too many American Jews view Holocaust memory as the substance of their Jewishness and agree that we need to base Jewish identity on positive Jewish content ("Identity and the Holocaust," Monday). While the Holocaust happened in the past, the anti-Semitism that caused it is growing, so the lessons of the 1930s and '40s remain relevant. That is why the American Jewish Committee, the global Jewish advocacy agency, has organized the largest protest against anti-Semitism in history, encouraging mayors in American and European cities to sign a statement denouncing anti-Semitism as incompatible with democratic values and committing to advance respectful coexistence in their own communities.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Battle-scarred as it is, North Broad Street is still punctuated with an extraordinary collection of majestic buildings. The farther north you go, the more beat-up its gilded relics seem to get. Yet at the corner of York Street, you'll find an intact neoclassical complex sharing company with a gas station and a vacant laundromat. The plainer of the two limestone pavilions was built in 1905 to house Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning, a private university that was devoted to the "scientific" study of ancient languages and Jewish history.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, masked men distributed fliers outside a synagogue in Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, demanding that all Jews register with the separatist Donetsk People's Republic and pay a fine - or be deported from "the republic. " On his visit to Ukraine this week, Vice President Biden denounced the fliers, insisting there is no place for anti-Semitism in Ukraine. The pro-Russian militants who have seized control of Donetsk insist they had nothing to do with the outrage and claim it was a "provocation" staged by the government in Kiev.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - A Jewish history museum in Warsaw has unveiled a reconstructed synagogue roof with an elaborately painted ceiling modeled on a 17th-century structure, presenting the first object that will go on permanent display in the highly awaited museum. The wooden roof and ceiling will be a key attraction in the Museum of the History of Polish Jews, which is due to open next year in the heart of the city's former Jewish quarter. Reporters in Warsaw were invited to view it Tuesday.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Sunday Chamber music Violinist Erin Keefe is joined by violinist Arnold Steinhardt , violists Ida Kavafian and Steven Tenenbom , cellists Ronald Thomas and Peter Wiley , and pianist Anna Polonsky in a recital of works by Dvorak, Strauss, and Brahms at 3 p.m. at the Curtis Institute of Music , 1726 Locust St. Tickets are $28. Call 215-893-7902. . . . The Duo Parisienne plays works for violin and harp by Schubert, Rachmaninoff, Franz Drdla, Cesar Cui, and Ravel at 3 p.m. at the German Society , 611 Spring Garden St. Tickets are $20; $10 for students.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A trove of ancient manuscripts in Hebrew characters rescued from caves in a Taliban stronghold in northern Afghanistan is providing the first physical evidence of a Jewish community that thrived there a thousand years ago. On Thursday, Israel's National Library unveiled the cache of recently purchased documents that run the gamut of life experiences, including biblical commentaries, personal letters, and financial records. Researchers say the "Afghan Genizah" marks the greatest such archive found since the "Cairo Genizah" was discovered in an Egyptian synagogue more than 100 years ago, a vast depository of medieval manuscripts considered to be among the most valuable collections of historical documents ever found.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
The explosion of Jewish culture in the region includes the Gershman Y's venerable Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival, which continues its explorations of the Jewish experience through Nov. 18. Films and documentaries from Argentina, France, Germany, Israel, Poland, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States reflect the diversity of the Jewish film world. According to Olivia Antsis, director of the festival, the films transcend religion and have wide appeal to audiences of various religions.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM - Ben-Zion Netanyahu, the historian and Zionist activist whose skepticism about peacemaking with the Arabs helped to shape the world outlook of his son, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, died on Monday. He was 102. The Prime Minister's office said in a statement that he died at home. It did not give a cause of death, but he had been ill recently. Born Ben-Zion Mileikowsky, in Warsaw, Poland, Netanyahu was a devout follower of revisionist Zionist leader Zeev Jabotinsky, who advocated Jewish military strength and opposed partitioning Palestine between Arabs and Jews.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Alfred Weisskopf, age 16, died in Auschwitz in 1944. So did Eva Bulova, age 15. And Zuzana Winterova, who was just 11. But Dotan Yarden, Haley Weiss, and Dana Handleman are very much alive. Along with 23 other young actors in the play I Never Saw Another Butterfly, which will be performed Thursday at the National Museum of American Jewish History, they are capturing the voices of children who lived in the Terezin concentration camp during the Holocaust. Between 1941 and 1945, 15,000 children were transported to Terezin, created by the Nazis as a "model ghetto.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rich stories involving a golem - a fictional Jewish guardian imbued with the dangerous power to protect at all costs - make perfect sense in light of Jewish history. A golem is like a security blanket, but much scarier: It provides comfort but also must fight oppression. The most famous golem story - they are all tales, with golem springing from an ancient Hebrew word that means a shapeless form - is set in 16th-century Prague. In the world-premiere play called The Golem, which Ego Po Classic Theater opened Thursday night with an experienced cast and unwavering sincerity - there's a neat twist.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|