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Jewish History

FOOD
September 10, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins at sundown Sept. 18, with a festive meal of traditional dishes. One almost universally followed tradition dictates serving a round (not braided and oblong) challah made with raisins, and dipping a slice of apple in honey to symbolize hope that the coming year will be sweet. But other traditional recipes and ingredients are largely dictated by the point of emigration for each family's ancestors. Just as Jewish history is a story of expulsion and migration, Jewish cuisine incorporates ingredients, spices, and cooking styles from lands where Jewish communities once flourished.
NEWS
March 18, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mel Gibson has conquered the box office with The Passion of the Christ, his foreign-language epic biopic about the last hours in the life of Jesus. And Gibson conquered those heights even though a number of Jewish groups have complained that the film sends an anti-Semitic message. Now, Gibson has told WABC Radio's Sean Hannity that he plans to make a flick about a Jewish rebellion in Roman-controlled Jerusalem 200 years before the birth of Christ. That would be the event celebrated each year at Hanukkah.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
GET IN THE RING WITH MIKE Planning to watch the Mike Tyson-Evander Holyfield WBA heavyweight match at 9 p.m. Saturday on pay-per-view cable? Did you know you can take part in the scoring of the fight? No, not the official scoring, but a viewer/Internet-participation event that works this way: While you watch the main event - and the undercard as well - sign on to http://www.mtyson.com - a site set up to let you use your personal computer to score each round. While the responses won't affect the judges' decisions, the Web score results will be announced during the cablecast of the bouts and at the conclusion of each fight.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, the painting is of a traditional Madonna and child, illuminated in gold, a celebration of two faces. But on second look, the facial features are pulled a bit off-balance, the eyes wary, slightly but perceptibly afraid. The subjects of this painting are not Mary and Jesus, but nameless Jewish ghetto children of the Holocaust. Mary Costanza, the artist, says she paints the children as religious figures - as icons. "The children in the ghettos helped each other.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gratz College has chosen as its next president a scholar in biblical studies from Connecticut who has a distinctive ability to mingle comfortably among each of the three main branches of Judaism. Jonathan Rosenbaum, 51, chairman of the University of Hartford's history department, established a respected Judaic studies program there and will take over at Gratz Oct. 1. Gratz's board of overseers will announce the appointment today and hopes Rosenbaum can boost enrollment and spark renewed interest among the area's Jewish community in the school's degree programs in Judaic and biblical studies.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a lightly wooded area in Neiffer, Limerick Township, there stands a stone marker enclosed by an iron fence. The stone is inscribed on one side in Hebrew and on the other in English. The Hebrew side is translated, "Theresa, wife of Jacob Hecht, died July 10, 1845, aged fifty-four years and four days. " The marker, which has existed in rural isolation for 150 years, is mute evidence of an early Jewish tradition in Montgomery County. "The history of the Jewish people in Philadelphia is well documented," said Murray Friedman, a local Jewish historian who is the director of the Center of Jewish History at Temple University.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite the sign on the door and the message on the hardware store's answering machine, Weiss True Value assistant manager Marc Kamp will probably still see people trying the door Wednesday as he makes his way to synagogue. It happens every year, said Kamp, and the confusion is understandable. There aren't many Jewish people left in Paulsboro, and his family store is the only one to close on Yom Kippur. "I'm used to it," he says with a shrug. But that's not how it always was. Once, there were enough families in town to support the thriving Paulsboro Jewish Community Center, on South Delaware Street at what is now St. Mary's Chapel, a Catholic church.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
The room was filled with laughter, chatter, joking and restlessness. The 12 young Philadelphians - six Jewish and six black - had come home from a historical sojourn in search of understanding. What they had found was an insight into each other and themselves which they hadn't known before. With hugs and hand-holding, they publicly acknowledged their find at a press conference yesterday. "I'm glad to be home," said JoAnne Springer, 16, of Center City, who is Jewish. "I don't know many people who would have gone to Jackson, Miss.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | By Eileen Kenna, Special to The Inquirer
About 10 years ago, some people thought it was time to write the obituary for Gratz College, the oldest independent college of Jewish studies in the United States. But an explosion of interest in Jewish studies and the financial and spiritual support of the community have injected new life into the 94-year-old college in Melrose Park, said Gary S. Schiff, Gratz president. "The renaissance in Jewish studies is an absolute phenomenon," Schiff said Tuesday. "Years ago, except at a few major universities, offering Jewish studies was like offering Sanskrit.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Sunday Chamber music Violinist Erin Keefe is joined by violinist Arnold Steinhardt , violists Ida Kavafian and Steven Tenenbom , cellists Ronald Thomas and Peter Wiley , and pianist Anna Polonsky in a recital of works by Dvorak, Strauss, and Brahms at 3 p.m. at the Curtis Institute of Music , 1726 Locust St. Tickets are $28. Call 215-893-7902. . . . The Duo Parisienne plays works for violin and harp by Schubert, Rachmaninoff, Franz Drdla, Cesar Cui, and Ravel at 3 p.m. at the German Society , 611 Spring Garden St. Tickets are $20; $10 for students.
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