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Jewish History

NEWS
September 18, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gratz College has chosen as its next president a scholar in biblical studies from Connecticut who has a distinctive ability to mingle comfortably among each of the three main branches of Judaism. Jonathan Rosenbaum, 51, chairman of the University of Hartford's history department, established a respected Judaic studies program there and will take over at Gratz Oct. 1. Gratz's board of overseers will announce the appointment today and hopes Rosenbaum can boost enrollment and spark renewed interest among the area's Jewish community in the school's degree programs in Judaic and biblical studies.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a lightly wooded area in Neiffer, Limerick Township, there stands a stone marker enclosed by an iron fence. The stone is inscribed on one side in Hebrew and on the other in English. The Hebrew side is translated, "Theresa, wife of Jacob Hecht, died July 10, 1845, aged fifty-four years and four days. " The marker, which has existed in rural isolation for 150 years, is mute evidence of an early Jewish tradition in Montgomery County. "The history of the Jewish people in Philadelphia is well documented," said Murray Friedman, a local Jewish historian who is the director of the Center of Jewish History at Temple University.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite the sign on the door and the message on the hardware store's answering machine, Weiss True Value assistant manager Marc Kamp will probably still see people trying the door Wednesday as he makes his way to synagogue. It happens every year, said Kamp, and the confusion is understandable. There aren't many Jewish people left in Paulsboro, and his family store is the only one to close on Yom Kippur. "I'm used to it," he says with a shrug. But that's not how it always was. Once, there were enough families in town to support the thriving Paulsboro Jewish Community Center, on South Delaware Street at what is now St. Mary's Chapel, a Catholic church.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
The room was filled with laughter, chatter, joking and restlessness. The 12 young Philadelphians - six Jewish and six black - had come home from a historical sojourn in search of understanding. What they had found was an insight into each other and themselves which they hadn't known before. With hugs and hand-holding, they publicly acknowledged their find at a press conference yesterday. "I'm glad to be home," said JoAnne Springer, 16, of Center City, who is Jewish. "I don't know many people who would have gone to Jackson, Miss.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | By Eileen Kenna, Special to The Inquirer
About 10 years ago, some people thought it was time to write the obituary for Gratz College, the oldest independent college of Jewish studies in the United States. But an explosion of interest in Jewish studies and the financial and spiritual support of the community have injected new life into the 94-year-old college in Melrose Park, said Gary S. Schiff, Gratz president. "The renaissance in Jewish studies is an absolute phenomenon," Schiff said Tuesday. "Years ago, except at a few major universities, offering Jewish studies was like offering Sanskrit.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Sunday Chamber music Violinist Erin Keefe is joined by violinist Arnold Steinhardt , violists Ida Kavafian and Steven Tenenbom , cellists Ronald Thomas and Peter Wiley , and pianist Anna Polonsky in a recital of works by Dvorak, Strauss, and Brahms at 3 p.m. at the Curtis Institute of Music , 1726 Locust St. Tickets are $28. Call 215-893-7902. . . . The Duo Parisienne plays works for violin and harp by Schubert, Rachmaninoff, Franz Drdla, Cesar Cui, and Ravel at 3 p.m. at the German Society , 611 Spring Garden St. Tickets are $20; $10 for students.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, masked men distributed fliers outside a synagogue in Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, demanding that all Jews register with the separatist Donetsk People's Republic and pay a fine - or be deported from "the republic. " On his visit to Ukraine this week, Vice President Biden denounced the fliers, insisting there is no place for anti-Semitism in Ukraine. The pro-Russian militants who have seized control of Donetsk insist they had nothing to do with the outrage and claim it was a "provocation" staged by the government in Kiev.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When you told someone you were from Marshall and Porter, you were saying you grew up around the brown-brick building where Eddie Fisher sang in the chorus, where the elders played gin rummy, and young guns learned to arc two-handed set shots under impossibly low ceilings. Today this hub of the downtown universe is called the Jacob and Ethel Stiffel Senior Center, but it was born 83 years ago as the Jewish Education Center No. 2, a safe, comfortable haven for the vibrant community of immigrants from Russia and other parts of Eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herman Spielman strolled up to the elderly man sweeping his stoop earlier this week and asked: "Did you know the Spielmans?" "Of course," the man replied. "They were a Jewish family - they lived in that house there, but they went away. " "Went away?" shouted Spielman. "They were murdered - murdered in concentration camps, my mother, my father, five brothers and sisters. I alone am left. I am a Spielman. " The old man looked shocked. "We didn't know," he said. "We knew nothing.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was the consummate diplomat, a man of grace and intelligence who rose to be Pope as Europe slipped toward World War II. His homilies for peace crackled on the radio from St. Peter's Square. He implored the Allies to spare Rome and its religious splendors the bombing that was thundering across the continent. But Pope Pius XII was also the pontiff accused of remaining silent against the specter of the Holocaust. Jewish groups and many religious scholars blame Pius - who was well-informed about the plight of the Jews - for not forcefully condemning the persecution that was often unfolding just outside Vatican walls.
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