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Jewish Identity

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NEWS
May 21, 1994 | By DIANE WINSTON
On a bitter-cold Friday night this winter, a score of cars pulled into the parking lot of a clapboard church in central New Jersey. Inside the building, chilled arrivals shed down parkas and heavy boots in a pale green meeting room whose overhead glare is softened by lights swathed in dusky fabric. In the center of the room, a low table covered with a striped cloth is crowded with candlesticks. Individually and in family groups, men, women and children make their way to the table, light the candles, and recite a blessing.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"URGENT! To all Ghetto Inhabitants! Resettlement means Treblinka and Treblinka means Death. Defy the Enemy, Defend Yourself and Your Family. Attack the Enemy with Whatever you have, Even with your Bare Fists. " If the new measure of modern massacre is Sept. 11, consider for a moment the Warsaw Ghetto in 1943, where 400,000 Polish Jews were herded into the tenements of the city's Jewish quarter with little idea the Nazis planned to simply slaughter them all. Then alarming leaflets such as the one above appeared on buildings and gates.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | BY DAVID RABEEYA
Israel and the Holocaust are outside the personal experiences of new generations of American Jews. Most Jewish youth in America, in different times and space than their grandparents, are living in multicultural, pluralistic and democratic Western societies in which physical dangers and harm are not relevant. The agenda of young American Jews is not different from their non-Jewish counterparts: achievements in the financial, economic and academic spheres, as well as enjoying and preserving their individual privileges and freedoms.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Bernie Sanders is the most successful Jewish candidate for the presidency ever. It's a rare sign of the health of our republic that no one seems to much care or even notice. Least of all, Sanders himself. Which prompted Anderson Cooper in a recent Democratic debate to ask Sanders whether he was intentionally keeping his Judaism under wraps. "No," answered Sanders: "I am very proud to be Jewish. " He then explained that the Holocaust had wiped out his father's family. And that he remembered as a child seeing neighbors with concentration camp numbers tattooed on their arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The postmodernist says: History is not one story, but many stories. And even a single tale can be told from many perspectives. But in a museum setting, where visitors may lack the time or patience to decode complex texts and displays, postmodernist narrative techniques raise obvious difficulties. How can such an approach to history be made clear and compelling? How can many stories be told as well as a single, overarching one? The National Museum of American Jewish History deserves credit for grappling with this dilemma in its newly installed core exhibition, "Creating American Jews" - even if, in the end, it doesn't succeed in resolving it. While it is meticulously researched and, in some ways, quite beautiful, the exhibition bogs down in a morass of textual detail, confusing displays and a nonlinear narrative that is a chore to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issue of Jewish identity, both ancient and modern, sparks two much-anticipated, long-term exhibitions opening this fall at Philadelphia museums. At the National Museum of American Jewish History, the ongoing struggle to forge an American Jewish identity will be dramatized in "Creating American Jews," which opens Thursday. The identity of biblical peoples will be the focus of "Canaan and Ancient Israel," starting Oct. 18 at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
A suburban Philadelphia teen-ager will be bat mitzvahed Monday in a Russian synagogue that for 40 years was used by the Soviets as a warehouse. The synagogue is in Lvov, in the southern Ukraine, near the town of Halicz, where Lindsay Weiss' grandfather, the son of a rabbi, was born 77 years ago. The family wanted to go to Halicz for the ceremony celebrating Lindsay's entrance into Jewish adulthood at 13. But, said her mother Andy, after...
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The slim, blue volume appears at first glance no different from other books used at Passover meals to recount the ancient story of Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt. But unlike other Passover books, it has no prayers, no references to God except as a figure in ancient myth. The blue-bound book is a haggada, a collection of readings and songs to be used at the seder, the holiday meal of Passover. But it is - as its subtitle proclaims - a haggada "for a secular celebration of Pesach (Passover)
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Hope Keller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christmas and Hanukah tend to be lumped together - with New Year's - as "the holidays," a chance to eat, drink and not go to work. But while Christmas is one of Christianity's most basic celebrations, Hanukah is not a major holiday in Judaism. And while Christmas celebrates a birth, Hanukah marks a war fought to retain Jewish identity. And not all Jews celebrate Hanukah in the same way. While certain customs - such as lighting the menorah and spinning the dreidel, a top used in a children's game of chance - are shared by Reform, Conservative and Orthodox Jews, Hanukah is generally a more festive occasion among Reform families than it is among the Orthodox.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun and Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Instead of spending their winter break in Cancun or Costa Rica, more than 150 local college students will tour Israel for 10 days with thousands of peers, courtesy of Jewish philanthropists, Jewish federations and the Israeli government. With headquarters in New York City, the project, called Birthright Israel, aims to send every Jewish 15-to-26-year-old to Israel because it is their birthright, organizers say. The students traveling to Israel this winter will be the first to stake their claim, in an effort expected to cost $210 million over five years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Bernie Sanders is the most successful Jewish candidate for the presidency ever. It's a rare sign of the health of our republic that no one seems to much care or even notice. Least of all, Sanders himself. Which prompted Anderson Cooper in a recent Democratic debate to ask Sanders whether he was intentionally keeping his Judaism under wraps. "No," answered Sanders: "I am very proud to be Jewish. " He then explained that the Holocaust had wiped out his father's family. And that he remembered as a child seeing neighbors with concentration camp numbers tattooed on their arms.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Deborah Waxman leafed through her mail before unwrapping a small orange, the punch line to a fabled Jewish myth. As it went, a rabbi once teased that a woman rabbi was like an orange on a ceremonial seder plate used during Passover. Neither belonged. The orange was a sly affirmation from a friend, mailed to Waxman as a symbol of the history she made by becoming the first woman and the first lesbian to lead a major movement of Judaism. Waxman, 47, took over in January as head of the Reconstructionist movement and president of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, the movement's seminary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia Theatre Company's world premiere musical Stars of David , based on Abigail Pogrebin's collection of interviews, asks a whole lot of famous people a single question: How do you feel about being Jewish? The net result of those answers is a survey of a dozen public figures whose attitudes toward Judaism range from ambivalence to outright chauvinism. This is less a celebration of being Jewish in America than a window onto a splintered minority - many of whom, despite being defined by religion, find their religion's teachings largely irrelevant, and identify with being Jewish mostly through empty rituals and food.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | BY KENNETH TURAN, Los Angeles Times
UNCONVENTIONAL, imaginative, nothing if not audacious, "Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life" is a portrait of creativity from the inside, a serious yet playful attempt to find an artistic way to tell an emotional truth. "Heroic" may seem like an odd word to attach to a man like the legendary songwriter and provocateur Serge Gainsbourg, a giant of 20th-century French popular music but also a man to whom creating outrage and scandal was second nature. Best known in this country for "Je T'Aime . . . Moi Non Plus," the racy duet he recorded with British actress Jane Birkin (actress Charlotte Gainsbourg is their daughter)
NEWS
July 13, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush unimpressed as House votes to set pullout date WASHINGTON -- The Democratic-controlled House, buoyed by a White House report showing mixed results toward progress in Iraq, defied President Bush yesterday and voted to begin withdrawing U.S. troops within 120 days. "I don't think Congress ought to be running the war," Bush, urging patience until a September status report, told a White House news conference before the House vote. The 223-201 House vote calls for the removal of all U.S. troops in Iraq by April 1, except for a limited force to train Iraqis, to battle al Qaeda and to protect U.S. assets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
People who celebrate Christmas always have endless options for cutting down on the holiday stress. But what about the Jews? We have lots of agita, too. We have to come up with a different Hanukkah gift for eight days, and eat questionable food prepared by sensitive relatives whom we haven't seen since Passover. However, Jews know better than almost everyone that the key to survival is humor. That's where Good for the Jews and Jewmongous come in - two musical comedy groups visiting the Tin Angel this month.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"URGENT! To all Ghetto Inhabitants! Resettlement means Treblinka and Treblinka means Death. Defy the Enemy, Defend Yourself and Your Family. Attack the Enemy with Whatever you have, Even with your Bare Fists. " If the new measure of modern massacre is Sept. 11, consider for a moment the Warsaw Ghetto in 1943, where 400,000 Polish Jews were herded into the tenements of the city's Jewish quarter with little idea the Nazis planned to simply slaughter them all. Then alarming leaflets such as the one above appeared on buildings and gates.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
By Terri Akman We so often travel through life on autopilot that we lose track of our real identities. Sitting in a warm, sweaty gym in the outskirts of Montreal, I recently learned a lot about my inner self, my family, community, country, and heritage. In August, as my 14-year-old son and his seven teammates competed in basketball in the 20th annual Jewish Community Center Maccabi Games, I felt the seed of pride take root deep inside me. The Maccabi games are a Jewish Olympics for teenagers, a tradition dating back to 1895 when the first all-Jewish sports club was formed in Constantinople.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | By Mary Blakinger INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Can Jews preserve their identity in contemporary U.S. society? Or does freedom erode bonds forged by generations of prejudice? Elliott Abrams, assistant U.S. secretary of state in the Reagan administration, will tackle that question in a program open to the community at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Har Zion Temple, 1500 Hagys Ford Rd., Penn Valley. The temple's Fishman Institute for Adult Jewish Learning is presenting the free program. Abrams is president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, and chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun and Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Instead of spending their winter break in Cancun or Costa Rica, more than 150 local college students will tour Israel for 10 days with thousands of peers, courtesy of Jewish philanthropists, Jewish federations and the Israeli government. With headquarters in New York City, the project, called Birthright Israel, aims to send every Jewish 15-to-26-year-old to Israel because it is their birthright, organizers say. The students traveling to Israel this winter will be the first to stake their claim, in an effort expected to cost $210 million over five years.
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