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NEWS
July 10, 2000 | By Matthew P. Blanchard, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They came with tape measures and a profound knowledge of Jewish law. Four black-clad Orthodox rabbis gathered to inspect a vinyl-sided building that, once complete, will perhaps be the most sacred spot in all of Bucks County for Orthodox Jews. Inside it is a mikvah, a large ritual bath that is central to the lives of Orthodox women. For five hours June 29, the rabbis inspected every inch of piping, tile and concrete to ensure compliance with Jewish law. Meanwhile, Rabbi Moshe Travitsky, who had spent three years raising $300,000 for the bathhouse, stood by nervously.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a move that has drawn outrage and criticism, the federal judge presiding over the Richard Glanton-Kathleen Frederick sexual harassment trial refused a request by Frederick's attorney to allow him time to observe the traditional Jewish mourning period for his mother's death. U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly denied the request despite appeals from attorney Alan Lerner's rabbi and other lawyers and judges on July 28, the day Esther Lerner was buried. Lerner requested last Thursday and Friday off to be with his family during the mourning period at home required by Jewish law, known as sitting shiva.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | JILL ANNA GREENBERG / Inquirer Suburban Staff
More than 300 Jewish prayer and religious books were buried in a ritual ceremony at Haym Salomon Memorial Park and Community Mausoleum in Frazer. Yesterday's ceremony followed Jewish law, which dictates disposing of books mentioning God's name by burial only. Helping lay a shawl over the books before covering them with earth is Marci Rubin (left) of Temple Shalom in Broomall.
NEWS
September 25, 2015
ISSUE | KAPAROT Jewish tradition misrepresented While I am reluctant to be seen as supporting a custom that is in fact dismissed in the Code of Jewish Law ( Orach Chaim 605:1 ), as one that should not be practiced, I cannot overlook the vicious headline and misleading content of this letter ("A barbaric means of atonement," Monday). The custom, observed by some, of slaughtering a chicken and donating it to a poor family before the Day of Atonement is not a requirement of Jewish law. When observed, Jewish law requires that the chicken be treated humanely, as in the case of all animals slaughtered for kosher food.
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The couple approaches the rabbi for advice. They want to have a child but have been unsuccessful. Is artificial insemination an option? What does Jewish law say? What will the child's status in the Jewish community be? What does Jewish law say? Those are questions that Jews are asking their rabbis, said Rabbi Marvin H. Goldman of Adath Zion Congregation, president of the Board of Rabbis of Greater Philadelphia. There are "many, many, many, many" people who want to know what Jewish law has to say about a matter such as artificial insemination, said Rabbi Richard F. Address, regional director of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Pennsylvania Council.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
RE THE letter from Judicial Watch President Thomas Fitton on late-term abortions: For starters, the medically indefinable procedure he refers to - the bill's medical fuzziness being one basis for legal challenge - does not occur during the birth of a child. By definition, an abortion, however late, occurs prior to and to prevent birth. Further, under Jewish law, it is quite possible that a late-term abortion, however it might be performed and however undesirable such a procedure may be under normal circumstances, could be required.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN THE ORTHODOX Jewish community of Northeast Philadelphia, one of the most revered figures was Rabbi Aaron Felder. He was not only a great scholar but also a loyal friend who was always available to help anyone, Orthodox or not, and he could tell a good joke. Far from the kind of scholar who stays immersed in books, studying arcane texts, Rabbi Felder liked to get out of his synagogue and engage the life of the city. "He was a man of the world," his longtime friend, Rabbi Solomon Isaacson, told the Jewish Exponent . Felder, for many decades the spiritual leader of B'nai Israel-Ohev Zedek at Castor and Solly avenues in the Northeast, died Friday at age 70. "No. 1, he was a scholar," Isaacson said.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents can add education to their shopping lists Saturday when South Jersey's Jewish community holds a Jewish Culture Shuk from 7:30 p.m. to midnight at Congregation Beth Jacob/Beth Israel on Evesham Road in Cherry Hill. Shuk is "a Hebrew word for marketplace, and this is going to be a marketplace of culture," said Susan Gold Seidel, chairwoman of the Jewish Culture Shuk Organizing Committee. The evening will feature 32 mini-courses about a variety of Jewish-related topics, from which participants may select three to attend.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Rabbi David Hartman, 81, one of the world's leading Jewish philosophers, who promoted both Jewish pluralism and interfaith dialogue, died Sunday, Feb. 10, after a long illness, said the Shalom Hartman Institute, founded by the rabbi more than 30 years ago. The Brooklyn-born Hartman was known for bringing a more liberal Judaism to the conservative brand commonplace in Israel, where he moved in 1971 after holding rabbinic posts in the United States...
NEWS
February 11, 2013
JERUSALEM - Rabbi David Hartman, one of the world's leading Jewish philosophers who promoted both Jewish pluralism and interfaith dialogue, has died. He was 81. The Brooklyn-born Hartman was known for bringing a more liberal Judaism to the conservative brand commonplace in Israel, where he moved in 1971 after holding rabbinical posts in the U.S. and Canada. He is praised for having developed a unique Jewish philosophy that positioned man at the center of Judaism, opening the door to a more tolerant approach that took personal choice and experience into greater account.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2015
ISSUE | KAPAROT Jewish tradition misrepresented While I am reluctant to be seen as supporting a custom that is in fact dismissed in the Code of Jewish Law ( Orach Chaim 605:1 ), as one that should not be practiced, I cannot overlook the vicious headline and misleading content of this letter ("A barbaric means of atonement," Monday). The custom, observed by some, of slaughtering a chicken and donating it to a poor family before the Day of Atonement is not a requirement of Jewish law. When observed, Jewish law requires that the chicken be treated humanely, as in the case of all animals slaughtered for kosher food.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When teachers at the Perelman Jewish Day School in Montgomery County were told in March that the private religious academy would no longer recognize their 60-member union, they filed a federal labor complaint - and then they went to a higher authority. With the clock ticking toward the end of their existing contract, Perelman teachers and their supporters are hoping a last-ditch appeal to Jewish religious law - specifically a 2008 finding by the religion's Conservative movement that affiliated institutions can't interfere with labor organizing - can save their union.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN THE ORTHODOX Jewish community of Northeast Philadelphia, one of the most revered figures was Rabbi Aaron Felder. He was not only a great scholar but also a loyal friend who was always available to help anyone, Orthodox or not, and he could tell a good joke. Far from the kind of scholar who stays immersed in books, studying arcane texts, Rabbi Felder liked to get out of his synagogue and engage the life of the city. "He was a man of the world," his longtime friend, Rabbi Solomon Isaacson, told the Jewish Exponent . Felder, for many decades the spiritual leader of B'nai Israel-Ohev Zedek at Castor and Solly avenues in the Northeast, died Friday at age 70. "No. 1, he was a scholar," Isaacson said.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Healing the planet As holistic nurses, we appreciate the spotlight that the approach of Earth Day focuses on protecting and preserving the planet ("Cleaning up New Jersey's act," April 7). It reminds us that we can't function or live well if water is polluted, the air contaminated, or the land poisoned, and ensures we consider the health of the ecosystem in relation to the health and safety of those in our care. Since we are taught to encourage natural healing from sunlight, minerals, and plants, Earth Day is a day for celebrating how body, mind, and spirit come together and are supported by the environment in which we live.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Rabbi David Hartman, 81, one of the world's leading Jewish philosophers, who promoted both Jewish pluralism and interfaith dialogue, died Sunday, Feb. 10, after a long illness, said the Shalom Hartman Institute, founded by the rabbi more than 30 years ago. The Brooklyn-born Hartman was known for bringing a more liberal Judaism to the conservative brand commonplace in Israel, where he moved in 1971 after holding rabbinic posts in the United States...
NEWS
February 11, 2013
JERUSALEM - Rabbi David Hartman, one of the world's leading Jewish philosophers who promoted both Jewish pluralism and interfaith dialogue, has died. He was 81. The Brooklyn-born Hartman was known for bringing a more liberal Judaism to the conservative brand commonplace in Israel, where he moved in 1971 after holding rabbinical posts in the U.S. and Canada. He is praised for having developed a unique Jewish philosophy that positioned man at the center of Judaism, opening the door to a more tolerant approach that took personal choice and experience into greater account.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | BY BROAD STREET BILLY as told to DAN GERINGER, phillies@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
AT GAME ONE of the National League Division Series, Broad Street Billy hung out on the rooftop of Citizens Bank Park with "Doc's Patients" - Phillies die-hards in matching hospital gowns who have seen almost every Roy Halladay start since July 5, 2010. They'll be at the park for tonight's do-or-die Game 5, knocking back Bud Lites, eyeing the ladies and, after each Doc strikeout, miming defibrillator resuscitations on each other's chests, then shouting, "1-2-3 Clear!" While the core Doc's Patients - Mike Jaffe of Wynnewood, Matt Leddy of Havertown, Ryan Christianson of Roxborough, Joe Bruno of Bala Cynwyd and Nick Mayo of Broomall - hung on Halladay's every pitch last Saturday, Leddy's college pal Tim Patz eyed roving Phillies-fan photographer Carina Groskopa of West Chester, and told Billy, "Girls love me. " "No," Leddy said.
NEWS
January 18, 2010 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prayers of the world might be focused on Haiti, but Jewish tradition says God was paying special attention yesterday to a little rowhouse synagogue on South Fourth Street. "May all your prayers be answered," Torah scribe Menachem Youlus said each time he extended his ink-stained hand to the men and women departing the open Torah scroll at Congregation Shivtei Yeshuron Ezras Israel. More than 50 had come to ritually ink in a letter of the restored scroll, but few seemed prepared for the emotion of the moment.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a tough Thanksgiving for Jacob Levy at Cherry Hill Kosher Mart. His supplier of kosher turkeys raised the price about 20 percent, but Levy said he couldn't pass that kind of increase on to his customers. "Thanksgiving was very hard to me," Levy said. "There's a shortage of meat," he said. "When there's a shortage, the price goes up, and the margin goes down. I had to suffer myself. " And Levy wasn't the only one suffering. Donald O'Brien, the category manager for ethnic foods at Acme Markets Inc., was scrambling to find enough kosher meat products to stock three key stores in kosher areas, although he did manage to scrounge up enough turkeys.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
RE THE letter from Judicial Watch President Thomas Fitton on late-term abortions: For starters, the medically indefinable procedure he refers to - the bill's medical fuzziness being one basis for legal challenge - does not occur during the birth of a child. By definition, an abortion, however late, occurs prior to and to prevent birth. Further, under Jewish law, it is quite possible that a late-term abortion, however it might be performed and however undesirable such a procedure may be under normal circumstances, could be required.
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