CollectionsJewish Museum
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Museum

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Michael Rosenzweig, president and chief executive of the National Museum of American Jewish History, will step down at the end of June. Ivy Barsky, museum director and chief operating officer, will become the museum's chief executive officer when Rosenzweig departs. Barsky joined the museum in July after serving as deputy director of New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. Ronald Rubin, cochair of the museum's trustees, noted that Rosenzweig shepherded the institution through capital fund-raising and construction to the opening of its new building at Fifth and Market Streets in November 2010.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charlotte E. Sommers Paul, 61, who as director of education at the National Museum of American Jewish History introduced Jewish personalities and their contributions to thousands, died of cancer Monday at her home in Wynnewood. Mrs. Paul started as a volunteer at the museum in 1976. Along the way, she organized a cadre of docents and an outreach program that elevated the small museum into a big-time repository of Jewish culture in America. A tireless worker, she also spent many weekends and evenings visiting churches, senior citizen centers, and other organizations to relate the contributions of early Jewish settlers, such as Haym Salomon, who helped finance the American Revolution.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The National Museum of American Jewish History, whose enormous new facility on Independence Mall opened with much optimism and fanfare two years ago, is struggling to find its voice and its audience. With 126,000 visitors in 2011 and declines in this year's first quarter, attendance has not come close to original expectations of 250,000 annually. The flurry of grand-opening hoopla in late 2010 and early 2011 has faded, taking the attention of visitors and their dollars elsewhere.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Museum of American Jewish History is expected to announce today that it has exercised an option to buy the KYW building at Fifth and Market Streets on Independence Mall in June. As soon as KYW vacates, the museum intends to raze the building to construct a new museum on the site. KYW has a lease to stay in the building until March 2007, said the museum's director, Gwen Goodman. The station is the only tenant, she said. "We hope to be in the new building by fall of 2009.
NEWS
April 7, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Philadelphia's Jewish museum has hired a corporate and securities lawyer as its next leader. Michael Rosenzweig, 57, has been named president and chief executive officer of the National Museum of American Jewish History. His last permanent job was with Johns Manville, a roofing products company in Denver, as senior vice president for corporate development and general counsel. Before that he was senior partner in the Atlanta office of the law firm McKenna Long & Aldridge. "I've never run a cultural organization, but I was founder of an educational institute, and I believe the museum at its core is an educational institution," Rosenzweig said.
NEWS
August 25, 2011
Claudia Gould, director of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania since 1999, has been named director of the Jewish Museum in New York City. She will assume her new position this fall, succeeding Joan Rosenbaum, who is retiring after 30 years. ICA's budget has tripled under Gould, exceeding $3 million this fiscal year, with exhibition frequency and staff increases reflecting that growth. Gould has sought to strengthen ties between ICA and the rest of Penn, and has supported a number of artists early in their careers, giving their first comprehensive museum shows to Lisa Yuskavage, Karen Kilimnik, Charles LeDray, and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1992 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's apt, if sadly so, that photographs of cemeteries should play such a central role in a new exhibition at the National Museum of Jewish History. The horrors of mass death, along with the preservation of memory and the responsibilities of the survivor, are inescapable themes of 20th-century Jewish history. But the Gratz College-sponsored show, "From Salonika to Curacao: A Sephardic Odyssey," also takes us back to a time when cemeteries connoted not extinction, but rootedness, tradition and communal ties.
LIVING
July 20, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Judaica, though a relatively new category at auctions, appears to have a growing market. Despite Sotheby's much-publicized sale two years ago of Hebrew manuscripts with clouded title, Judaica did very well at auction this season. Sotheby's sold $2.5 million worth of Judaica at sales in November, and, in March, Christie's, the other major New York auction house, sold nearly a million dollars worth of Hebrew books. Although Hebrew manuscripts have sold for more than $800,000, the most expensive Jewish ceremonial object sold at auction in recent years is a large, 18th-century Hanukah lamp, formed as a tree with pomegranate-shaped oil containers, which brought $110,000 at Sotheby's in June 1983.
NEWS
May 15, 2004 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephan H. Rollin, 78, founder of a local high-tech company whose parts helped Apollo 8 circle the moon in 1968, died of heart disease Wednesday in his Cherry Hill home. He started EMC Technology with two partners in Philadelphia in 1963, moved it to Cherry Hill in 1972, and sold it to investors for more than $20 million in 1998. EMC - which Mr. Rollin liked to joke stood for Eat Mother's Cookies - made tiny, highly engineered resistors, capacitors and attenuators for the aerospace, defense and cellular telephone industries.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Being a famous architect can't be easy when you've never managed to complete a building in your own country. Daniel Libeskind may be heralded as a poet of loss for his extraordinary Jewish Museum in Berlin and his Imperial War Museum in England, but he was virtually run out of New York after his poignant master plan for ground zero was caught up in the city's infamous tribal infighting. While that tragic site remains a maze of exposed cable and pipes, the Bronx-raised Libeskind has rescued his reputation by heading - like so many other frustrated architects - into the Great American West.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
IN 1985, ROCK impresario Bill Graham was one of the producers of Live Aid in Philly. Now, 25 years after his death in 1991, The National Museum of American Jewish History here at 5th and Market Streets will host the East Coast premiere of "Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution" from Sept. 16 to Jan. 16, 2017. Graham was a holocaust survivor who fled Nazi Germany as a boy to come to America and become one of the most influential promoters of the rock era. If you were a big act from the 1960s to the 1980s - The Grateful Dead , Jefferson Airplane , Janis Joplin , Jimi Hendrix , Santana , Fleetwood Mac , the Who , Led Zeppelin , the Doors , Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young , Bob Dylan , The Band , the Rolling Stones - Graham had some role in your career.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2014 | By Sea Kaplan, For The Inquirer
At the end of July I had the unexpected pleasure of taking a river cruise in Russia with a friend. This was exciting - my mother was from Zvenyhorodka, a town north of Kiev in the Ukraine, my father from a suburb south of Kiev. The cruise started out in St. Petersburg and wound up in Moscow. On a scheduled bus trip in Moscow, we went to the Museum of the Jewish History in Russia, the only Jewish museum and Holocaust memorial in the country. When we got to the museum, the men were laying tefillin - wearing black boxes on their foreheads containing verses from the Torah that serve as a reminder of God's intervention during the Exodus from Egypt - so we were ushered upstairs to the balcony for the service.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
You got a ball? A bat? A card? An autograph? A picture? Or maybe just a memory? The National Museum of American Jewish History wants to know about it for a major exhibition scheduled to open in March of 2014, "Chasing Dreams: Baseball and Jews in America. " The museum has set up a Tumblr site - http://chasingdreamsbaseball.tumblr.com - for the purpose of collecting materials for the exhibition and learning about the experiences of people everywhere. "Tumblr is a way to reach out to the fans," said the museum's associate curator, Ivy Weingram, who has been working on the exhibition for more than two years.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The National Museum of American Jewish History, whose enormous new facility on Independence Mall opened with much optimism and fanfare two years ago, is struggling to find its voice and its audience. With 126,000 visitors in 2011 and declines in this year's first quarter, attendance has not come close to original expectations of 250,000 annually. The flurry of grand-opening hoopla in late 2010 and early 2011 has faded, taking the attention of visitors and their dollars elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the most significant documents in the history of Jews in the New World will go on display Friday at the National Museum of American Jewish History as part of the museum's first special exhibition, To Bigotry No Sanction: George Washington and Religious Freedom.   "What was at the forefront of 18th-century debate," said Josh Perelman, the museum's chief curator and director of exhibitions, "is still relevant today, a time when religion is a topic of wide civic discussion, a time when there is a Mormon presidential candidate.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time Torah No. 586 was read during services probably was a few days before the Jews from a small town in Czechoslovakia were rounded up and sent to a Nazi concentration camp. The sacred scroll was one of 1,564 left in Czech synagogues when the people who used them were taken away to die. But Thursday, the 130-year-old Torah from the town of Lipník nad Becvou will be rededicated at the Martins Run senior living community in Marple Township while a survivor who read from it during his bar mitzvah watches via Skype from the Czech Republic.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Alfred Weisskopf, age 16, died in Auschwitz in 1944. So did Eva Bulova, age 15. And Zuzana Winterova, who was just 11. But Dotan Yarden, Haley Weiss, and Dana Handleman are very much alive. Along with 23 other young actors in the play I Never Saw Another Butterfly, which will be performed Thursday at the National Museum of American Jewish History, they are capturing the voices of children who lived in the Terezin concentration camp during the Holocaust. Between 1941 and 1945, 15,000 children were transported to Terezin, created by the Nazis as a "model ghetto.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Michael Rosenzweig, president and chief executive of the National Museum of American Jewish History, will step down at the end of June. Ivy Barsky, museum director and chief operating officer, will become the museum's chief executive officer when Rosenzweig departs. Barsky joined the museum in July after serving as deputy director of New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. Ronald Rubin, cochair of the museum's trustees, noted that Rosenzweig shepherded the institution through capital fund-raising and construction to the opening of its new building at Fifth and Market Streets in November 2010.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly a year after its celebrity-packed opening, the National Museum of American Jewish History has sharply reduced its attendance expectations and stepped up the call for donations to support its day-to-day operations. The slumping economy and a cold, snowy launch season combined to depress ticket sales at the $142 million gallery overlooking Independence Mall. In addition, officials say, the initial projection of 250,000 visitors annually was unrealistic. They have set a new benchmark of 125,000, which they anticipate reaching by the first anniversary on Nov. 26. The good news on the eve of the High Holidays - starting at sundown Wednesday with Rosh Hashanah - is that attendance has been trending up, according to museum chief executive officer and president Michael Rosenzweig.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Spaceship crash called accidental MOSCOW - The crash of a Russian supply ship bound for the International Space Station last month was caused by a manufacturing flaw, the country's space agency said Thursday. The flaw led to the failure of a gas generator of the Soyuz rocket's third-stage engine minutes after launch, the agency said. A government panel investigating the Aug. 24 crash concluded that the manufacturing flaw was "accidental. " The space agency said all similar rocket engines would be checked.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|