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Jewish Population

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NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time a study was done on the Jewish population in South Jersey was 1991. That survey led to increased services for children and adults with special needs, and the development of a senior living center for older Jewish residents, Lions Gate, in Voorhees. A survey now underway attempts to provide real data - not just anecdotes - on where the local Jewish population lives, prays, how they marry, and what services they need most. "The [Jewish] population has changed in 22 years," said Debbie Ret, 50, of Franklin Township, Gloucester County, president of Congregation B'nai Tikvah-Beth Israel in Sewell.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This year, for the first time, there will be no school in the Unionville- Chadds Ford district on the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, which both fall in September. Students and staff will be given holidays on Sept. 6 for the Jewish New Year, or Rosh Hashana, and Sept. 15, the solemn holiday of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. The changes were included in the new school calendar for the 1994-1995 year. Board President Kammy Franz said at the board meeting Monday night that the calendar changes reflected a growing Jewish population in the school district.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The neo-Nazis are trying to march into town. On two left feet. Earlier this week, after announcing their intentions to march upon Cherry Hill - with its large Jewish population and the area's lone openly gay bar - members of the Nationalist Party applied for a permit to rally at Hopkins Pond park. But Hopkins Pond is in Haddonfield. That's fine, said Harry Heriegel Jr., local spokesman for the Nationalist Party. "Haddonfield is going to make more noise. . . . They're going nuts over a house that was painted blue.
NEWS
June 17, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Interfaith marriages and relocations appear to have taken a toll on the local Jewish population, according to a new survey. The number of Jews in Philadelphia and the four surrounding Pennsylvania counties has declined 16.7 percent since 1983, a study by the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia finds. Released yesterday, the survey reports that the Jewish population in the city and in Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Bucks Counties now stands at around 200,300 - down from the 240,400 who lived here 13 years ago. The number of Jewish households (i.e.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
WELCOME AMERICA brochures contain the word "niggah," and Bruce Crawley and Mayor Street do nothing. If it was a Jewish slur, those brochures would be carted away immediately, and Crawley and Street would apologize humbly to the Jewish population. To call them Uncle Toms would be too nice. They're fudge-dipped marshmallows who protect the interests of all ethnic populations except their own. Grant Baldwin, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | By David Rabeeya
Even with establishment of the state of Israel, the majority of Jews continue to live outside Israel. Radical demographic and cultural changes in Israel will probably determine the integration of the Jewish population into the vast Arab world. g1gues30DAVID RABEEYA Israel could utilize economic, political and military tools to postpone her impending absorption into the Arab Middle East or initiate new strategic steps to control this inescapable demographic process. But even new political and disagreements, wars and conflicts will not alter this cultural and economic union of Israel with her Arab neighbors.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The good news is, they don't call on Friday nights. But if someone in your household is Jewish, you might soon be asked to give up 15 minutes of dinner (or that Seinfeld rerun) to talk about how you live. The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia - the largest Jewish philanthropic and social-service agency serving Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania suburbs - is conducting its first demographic survey of the area's Jewish population in 13 years. The study seeks to create a snapshot of the area's Jewish population so the federation can better allocate services, according to Alan Molod, chairman of the organization's population study committee.
NEWS
February 12, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to the Inquirer
Members of Congregation Beth Jacob-Beth Israel plan to celebrate the High Holy Days in a new $4 million synagogue in Cherry Hill in the fall of 1987. The congregation now meets in the much older community of Merchantville, but it has found that its present facility is too small and too far away from the shifting center of the South Jersey Jewish community. The selection of the Cherry Hill site points to the township's growth over the years into the demographic center of the Jewish community in South Jersey.
NEWS
January 17, 2010 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the alarm of some local Jewish leaders, a new survey indicates that the Philadelphia area's Jewish population is growing but aging, the under-18 group is shrinking, and those 40 and younger identify less with Jewish causes than do their elders. In the city and four suburban Pennsylvania counties, the Jewish population has increased about 10 percent, to 214,700, since the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia's last survey 13 years ago. However, the number of Jews younger than 18 is down 16 percent.
NEWS
January 20, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After conducting an interview with Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat in Tunisia in 1993, a Jewish Exponent reporter excitedly called her editor. He was equally pleased by the coup, but her story never ran. The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia, the Exponent's publisher, spiked it, saying it gave a platform to the enemy. Sixteen years later, the reporter is back at the Exponent, and this time she's calling the shots. "I've always felt that knowledge is power, and to know your enemy is to know what you're up against," says Swarthmore College graduate Lisa Hostein, 48, who took over as executive editor Jan. 5. Clearly, this isn't your Jewish grandmother's Exponent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
PICTURE A grizzly, swashbuckling pirate who sails the high seas in search of ships to plunder. Now, add a yarmulke. Actually, Jewish pirates who ransacked Spanish ships in Caribbean waters during Colonial times wore more intimidating Cavalier-style hats. But make no mistake: There were Jewish pirates of the Caribbean. "They were pirates through and through," said Sahar Oz, director of programming for the Gershman Y, which hosts a talk about the Sephardic seafarers Thursday, in conjunction with a photo exhibit on Caribbean synagogues.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
ISSUE | NEEDY Helping hands The Jewish community is not immune to hardship ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept. 16). I am a packer and driver for the Beth Sholom Mitzvah Pantry. It is very gratifying when you go to a person's house and are able to provide basic food items. We only pack twice a month, but our tight-knit group of semi-retirees and retirees feels as though we are helping and hope that one day we can break the poverty cycle. |Ann Gold, Philadelphia, gold500219@aol.com Charity is the key Reality has finally hit that the area Jewish population does not all go to Florida in the winter ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time a study was done on the Jewish population in South Jersey was 1991. That survey led to increased services for children and adults with special needs, and the development of a senior living center for older Jewish residents, Lions Gate, in Voorhees. A survey now underway attempts to provide real data - not just anecdotes - on where the local Jewish population lives, prays, how they marry, and what services they need most. "The [Jewish] population has changed in 22 years," said Debbie Ret, 50, of Franklin Township, Gloucester County, president of Congregation B'nai Tikvah-Beth Israel in Sewell.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Pablo Gorondi, Associated Press
BUDAPEST, Hungary - Thousands attended an anti-Nazi rally Sunday in Hungary organized by Jewish and civic groups to protest a far-right lawmaker's call to screen Jews for national security risks. The rally was unusual because politicians from both the government and opposition parties shared a stage outside parliament. Marton Gyongyosi of the far-right Jobbik party said Monday in the legislature that it was time "to assess . . . how many people of Jewish origin there are here, and especially in the Hungarian parliament and the Hungarian government, who represent a certain national security risk.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yom Kippur, which arrives Tuesday evening, is the holiest day of the Jewish calendar: a time when Jews are said to be "closest to God and the quintessence of their own souls," and ask the Almighty for forgiveness and another year of life. For some, though, the great "Who Am" - the divine being who called to Moses from the burning bush, and resides at the heart of Jewish belief and practice - is problematic. "We don't believe in God," explained Glen Loev, 56, of Bryn Mawr. Raised a Conservative Jew, the retired dentist no longer considers himself religious.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sepia-tone photographs, some dating from the early 1900s, tell the story of another era, when Camden had a close-knit Jewish community, when residents along Kaighns and Haddon Avenues knew each other for generations and showed up to land a hand when someone was sick. Through most of the 20th century, Jewish shopkeepers, judges, lawyers, and doctors helped build the city, and developed institutions and agencies to care for others in the community. For Ruth Bogutz, the images she has collected evoke warm memories of a golden age in Camden - from about 1920 to 1970 - before its Jewish residents dispersed to the suburbs.
NEWS
April 8, 2012
By Harri Nykänen Translated from the Finnish by Kristian London Bitter Lemon. 247 pp. $14.95 Reviewed by Peter Rozovsky The protagonist of Harri Nykänen's Nights of Awe is named Ariel Kafka, and he's one of two Jewish police officers in Helsinki. Now, Finland's entire Jewish population is no bigger than a couple of good-sized Long Island bar mitzvahs, so it's no shock that Jews would be somewhat exotic figures there. Nykänen has Kafka react with head-shaking amusement to well-meaning questions about Jews, and the deadpan humor is of a piece with what Nykänen did so well in Raid and the Blackest Sheep , the only previous book of his available in English.
TRAVEL
February 19, 2012 | By Beth J. Harpaz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Museums and historic sites, and a trendy new Tribeca restaurant inspired by an old-school Catskills resort. They're all part of Jewish New York, with a heritage that stretches back 400 years and a vital contemporary community that's reinterpreting old traditions for the 21st century. New York City has the largest concentration of Jews in the world outside of Israel, according to the Jewish Databank, which put the city's Jewish population at 1.4 million in 2002. The stories of European Jews who arrived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are relatively well-known and easy to find in places such as the Lower East Side.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. - Dressed in his tennis whites, Sid Dinerstein hunches over the Palm Beach Post's scramble, Sudoku, and crossword, saying they're the most worthwhile part of a paper he dismisses as "another left-wing rag. " Fortified with a can of Diet Sierra Mist, the 65-year-old chairman of the Palm Beach County Republican Party says he usually hits the courts five times a week, but as the national political ship sails towards Florida,...
TRAVEL
October 2, 2011 | By Paula Marantz Cohen, For The Inquirer
ROME - It is still hot in Rome this time of year. That doesn't mean you shouldn't go. In fact, a little sweat seems a small price to pay for the chance, at almost every corner, to duck into a church where you can sit in the shade and stare at a lustrous virgin by Raphael or a strenuously ardent saint by Caravaggio. Still, on a recent trip to the Eternal City we happened to lodge in the ancient Trastevere section, and on one particularly sweltering day, not wishing to walk too far, we crossed the Tiber River to explore the nearby neighborhood, Rome's former Jewish ghetto.
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