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Jewish Studies

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NEWS
November 2, 1989 | By Eileen Kenna, Special to The Inquirer
About 10 years ago, some people thought it was time to write the obituary for Gratz College, the oldest independent college of Jewish studies in the United States. But an explosion of interest in Jewish studies and the financial and spiritual support of the community have injected new life into the 94-year-old college in Melrose Park, said Gary S. Schiff, Gratz president. "The renaissance in Jewish studies is an absolute phenomenon," Schiff said Tuesday. "Years ago, except at a few major universities, offering Jewish studies was like offering Sanskrit.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judah Goldin, 83, formerly of Swarthmore, a Jewish scholar and former professor at the University of Pennsylvania, died Saturday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Professor Goldin died of respiratory failure after being in a coma for five days. A longtime resident of Swarthmore, he moved to the Quadrangle, an assisted-living facility in Haverford, three years ago. Professor Goldin, who was also a rabbi, was the world's leading authority on the Ethics of the Fathers, the best-known ethical treatise in Jewish literature, said Jeffrey Tigay, a friend and professor of Jewish studies at Penn.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Frank C. Hess Jr. of Woodlyn has been elected secretary of the board of trustees at Delaware County Community College in Marple Township. Hess, former director of community affairs at Gulf Oil in Philadelphia, is vice chairman of the St. Agnes Corp., president of the Gulf Annuitants Club of Philadelphia and vice president of the Northern Atlantic Seaboard Area of the Chevron Retirees Association. He is chairman of the Delaware County chapter of the March of Dimes and is a member of Better Housing for Chester and the Citizens Advisory Council of the Ridley School District.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Geza Vermes, 88, a translator of the Dead Sea Scrolls and renowned for books exploring the Jewish background of Jesus, died Wednesday, David Ariel, president of the Oxford Center for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, said Saturday. Mr. Vermes had an early interest in the Dead Sea Scrolls, a cache of documents written between 200 B.C. and A.D. 200 which were discovered in caves at Qumran, near Jericho, between 1947 and 1956. Mr. Vermes published the first English translation of the scrolls in 1962.
NEWS
July 24, 2005 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Shalom, Shalom. " Rabbi Rayzel Raphael is bringing her message to a new home at Beth Israel Congregation in Woodbury. Music and song will be the method she uses to deliver that message to the 50 families in the congregation. "Music bypasses the rational mind and can unlock the heart as well as the soul. It's as essential as food," Raphael said. "Music sets the tone and names the themes in what debates and discussions never could. " Raphael said she would play music that conveys the needs of the congregation, working the fine line between upbeat concert tones and the comfortable and supportive sounds of healing services.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Nora Levin, 73, a Jewish scholar who wrote what has become a standard and widely respected work on the Holocaust, died yesterday at the American Oncologic Hospital. She lived in the city's East Oak Lane section. A historian, librarian and teacher, Ms. Levin devoted her life to Jewish studies. At the time of her death, she was associate professor of Modern Jewish History at Gratz College. In fact, she was due to receive an honorary degree from the Melrose Park school on Sunday, which is now the day of her funeral.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a night for the children - until their parents heard about it. Peter Nero, the pianist, composer and conductor who this year is celebrating the 20th anniversary season of Peter Nero and the Philly Pops, was invited to speak at Har Zion Temple on Monday night. But of the 125 or so in the audience, adults outnumbered students. Once parents and grandparents learned that Nero would be there as part of the Jewish cultures program for the Har Zion High School of Jewish Studies, they asked to come, too, said Norman Einhorn, the principal of the school.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2014 | By Judd Kruger Levingston, For The Inquirer
'Did you make it to the bottom?" everyone asked when we got back from the Grand Canyon. "Of course we did," I answered - but it took five days and a father-son journey to get there. My son Ivan and I have enjoyed backpacking in the Pennsylvania wilderness, and our appetite for the Southwest was whetted four years ago on a family trip to Grand Canyon National Park. Ivan and I hiked most of the way down until an early sunset and common sense led us to pledge to come back to celebrate my 50th birthday with a father-son backpacking trip.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen Ehrlich, 84, an accountant and a committed Zionist whose family fled Germany after the violence that accompanied the rise of Nazism touched it personally, died Wednesday at Penn Medicine at Rittenhouse after a stroke. Mr. Ehrlich spent most of his professional career as chief financial officer for Rayco and Bright Star Industries, makers of batteries and flashlights. His family escaped Adolf Hitler and the Nazis after a bomb exploded in his father's food factory in Frankfurt in 1936.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Salo Weindling, 88, of Lower Makefield Township, a teacher, linguist and poet, died Monday on Yom Kippur, Judaism's highest holy day. He died at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township. Dr. Weindling had taught his grandsons Hebrew, German and Latin through telephone conversations and helped them prepare for the Torah readings at their bar mitzvahs. Only hours before his death, he was teaching Hebrew to a close friend. "He was a superb teacher, and his students were perennial winners in German-language competitions," said his daughter, Hannah Helen Cohen.
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TRAVEL
July 21, 2014 | By Judd Kruger Levingston, For The Inquirer
'Did you make it to the bottom?" everyone asked when we got back from the Grand Canyon. "Of course we did," I answered - but it took five days and a father-son journey to get there. My son Ivan and I have enjoyed backpacking in the Pennsylvania wilderness, and our appetite for the Southwest was whetted four years ago on a family trip to Grand Canyon National Park. Ivan and I hiked most of the way down until an early sunset and common sense led us to pledge to come back to celebrate my 50th birthday with a father-son backpacking trip.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph S. Snyder, 91, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer, volunteer worker for Jewish charities, and master storyteller, died Monday, April 7, of congestive heart failure at his home. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Mr. Snyder graduated from Pennsylvania State University and, in 1948, the Dickinson Law School. He served as an Army weatherman in Reykjavik, Iceland, during World War II. Mr. Snyder worked in Harrisburg as a deputy attorney general from 1949 to 1963, when he was invited to join the Philadelphia law firm Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Geza Vermes, 88, a translator of the Dead Sea Scrolls and renowned for books exploring the Jewish background of Jesus, died Wednesday, David Ariel, president of the Oxford Center for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, said Saturday. Mr. Vermes had an early interest in the Dead Sea Scrolls, a cache of documents written between 200 B.C. and A.D. 200 which were discovered in caves at Qumran, near Jericho, between 1947 and 1956. Mr. Vermes published the first English translation of the scrolls in 1962.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen Ehrlich, 84, an accountant and a committed Zionist whose family fled Germany after the violence that accompanied the rise of Nazism touched it personally, died Wednesday at Penn Medicine at Rittenhouse after a stroke. Mr. Ehrlich spent most of his professional career as chief financial officer for Rayco and Bright Star Industries, makers of batteries and flashlights. His family escaped Adolf Hitler and the Nazis after a bomb exploded in his father's food factory in Frankfurt in 1936.
NEWS
July 24, 2005 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Shalom, Shalom. " Rabbi Rayzel Raphael is bringing her message to a new home at Beth Israel Congregation in Woodbury. Music and song will be the method she uses to deliver that message to the 50 families in the congregation. "Music bypasses the rational mind and can unlock the heart as well as the soul. It's as essential as food," Raphael said. "Music sets the tone and names the themes in what debates and discussions never could. " Raphael said she would play music that conveys the needs of the congregation, working the fine line between upbeat concert tones and the comfortable and supportive sounds of healing services.
LIVING
March 5, 2000 | By Naomi Geschwind, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"A human being is a ladder placed on earth whose top touches heaven," says David S. Ariel, outlining the theme of a talk he delivered last weekend as scholar-in-residence at Ohev Shalom synagogue of Bucks County. Ariel, president of the Cleveland College of Jewish Studies, has written three books on what he calls "spiritual Judaism. " He aims to do no less than "restore heart and soul to Jewish life. " It's a tall order. Faith and spiritual fervor have not been at the core of mainstream synagogue culture in this century.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Salo Weindling, 88, of Lower Makefield Township, a teacher, linguist and poet, died Monday on Yom Kippur, Judaism's highest holy day. He died at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township. Dr. Weindling had taught his grandsons Hebrew, German and Latin through telephone conversations and helped them prepare for the Torah readings at their bar mitzvahs. Only hours before his death, he was teaching Hebrew to a close friend. "He was a superb teacher, and his students were perennial winners in German-language competitions," said his daughter, Hannah Helen Cohen.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a night for the children - until their parents heard about it. Peter Nero, the pianist, composer and conductor who this year is celebrating the 20th anniversary season of Peter Nero and the Philly Pops, was invited to speak at Har Zion Temple on Monday night. But of the 125 or so in the audience, adults outnumbered students. Once parents and grandparents learned that Nero would be there as part of the Jewish cultures program for the Har Zion High School of Jewish Studies, they asked to come, too, said Norman Einhorn, the principal of the school.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gratz College has chosen as its next president a scholar in biblical studies from Connecticut who has a distinctive ability to mingle comfortably among each of the three main branches of Judaism. Jonathan Rosenbaum, 51, chairman of the University of Hartford's history department, established a respected Judaic studies program there and will take over at Gratz Oct. 1. Gratz's board of overseers will announce the appointment today and hopes Rosenbaum can boost enrollment and spark renewed interest among the area's Jewish community in the school's degree programs in Judaic and biblical studies.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judah Goldin, 83, formerly of Swarthmore, a Jewish scholar and former professor at the University of Pennsylvania, died Saturday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Professor Goldin died of respiratory failure after being in a coma for five days. A longtime resident of Swarthmore, he moved to the Quadrangle, an assisted-living facility in Haverford, three years ago. Professor Goldin, who was also a rabbi, was the world's leading authority on the Ethics of the Fathers, the best-known ethical treatise in Jewish literature, said Jeffrey Tigay, a friend and professor of Jewish studies at Penn.
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