IN THE NEWS

Jfk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | By Sandy Grady, Daily News Columnist
In the taprooms of Philadelphia, where I once spent a lot of nights, you could count on seeing three items behind the bar: One, a black-and-white team picture of the 1960 championship Eagles. Two, a sign, "In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash. " Three, an 8 x 10 colored photo, his chin up, eyes sky-blue, of John F. Kennedy. Now, on the day 25 years after he was shot, you still can see fading photos of JFK on taproom walls. Doesn't matter whether the neighborhood is Irish, Italian or black.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | BY STEFAN KANFER, From the New York Times
Under my supervision, a group of investigators has gone over the locations that Oliver Stone used in directing the movie, "JFK," among them Dealey Plaza and the Book Depository in Dallas. On the first take several pedestrians got in the way. On the second the film was out of focus. On the third I forgot to take off the lens cap. In no case did we get precisely the same results the Stone did. It seems fair to conclude that one person, unaided, could not possibly have made "JFK.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | BY PAUL A. MERCURIO
The onslaught of criticism directed at Oliver Stone's film "JFK" is unlike any media attack in recent history. Articles and editorials in the mainstream press have attacked the movie as paranoid, absurd and a blatant pack of lies. Incredibly, Time magazine even made these assertions before the film was even ready for release. Clearly, Stone has stepped on the wrong toes to elicit such a loud and furious protest. The movie, which its director frankly admits is a "combination of hypothesis and fact," strongly suggests that President Kennedy's assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, was a coup d'etat engineered by the CIA, the FBI and the military-industrial complex, then covered up by the Warren Commission.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
SHARING THE GRIEF Watching John F. Kennedy, Jr. mature was a balm to the enduring grief over his father's assassination. It gave hope that there were new heroes in the world who might address the very serious needs of the downtrodden. His death dampens that hope and reveals once again that we live in a world of chaos and uncertainty where we are too often thrown back upon our own poor devices to cure the ills of the world. The Kennedys are in the tradition of Franklin Roosevelt, who also had all the advantages, including physical beauty, but who wasn't really content unless he was working on the improvement of the lives of those less fortunate.
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
AFTER 40 years, the assassination of John F. Kennedy continues to ignite conspiracy theories due to the peculiar circumstances and seemingly inexplicable actions surrounding it. Kennedy's death remains an emotionally charged mystery for millions of Americans who lost their idealism, and perhaps their faith in government itself, on that sunny, autumn day in Dallas, Nov. 22, 1963. In an inaugural address that has become a poignant reminder of the idealism of the 1960s, JFK challenged Americans to ask not what their country could do for them, but what they could do for their country.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
WE STARE at the screen as the motorcade turns into Dealey Plaza. We see the young president and his wife wave to an adoring crowd from the back of their limo. And we hold our breath. On cue, the shots ring out. And for the 50th year in a row, we watch Walter Cronkite tell us what we already know. We return to the scene of the crime every year like pilgrims to the hallowed shrine where their faith was born. Those of us of the "where-were-you-when" generation retell our stories to those too young to remember.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and USA Today
Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg yesterday announced the winner of a competition for a memorial to President John F. Kennedy and unveiled a three- foot plaster model of her father in Boston. The winning artist is Isabel McIlvain of Concord, Mass., who will create a bronze sculpture for the front lawn of the Massachusetts Statehouse. It will be dedicated May 29, 1989, which would have been Kennedy's 72d birthday. The statue shows JFK in what selection-committee members described as a classic pose - in midstride, eyes forward, elbows bent, with his left hand tucked into his jacket pocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The grenades being tossed in Oliver Stone's direction for Nixon are mere marshmallows when measured against the tumultuous reception for his masterwork JFK four years ago. Stone was vilified for lionizing New Orleans district attorney and one-man crusader Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) and presenting a view of the assassination of John F. Kennedy that the gullible would treat as historical fact. The truth is - and Stone's film vehemently argues that truth is the first casualty of any assassination - that JFK is a vision infused with molten rage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July, Oliver Stone reopened the still festering wounds of the Vietnam war. With JFK, he takes up the terrible day that changed history and our lives and, in a movie that fuses molten rage with cool argument, presents the death of a president as a cancer that has metastasized through the body politic. Call JFK - which may not be quite the best movie released this year but is certainly the most important - paranoid, polemical and distorted. True believers in the bitterly disputed conclusions of the Warren Commission report may use those words if they are feeling polite.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | by Theodore Sorensen, From the New York Times
Countless foreign officials and businessmen have asked me whether Bill Clinton could restore to the White House the sense of vision and vitality they admired in John F. Kennedy and whether the Clinton approach to the presidency would enlarge our horizons like the New Frontier. His initial transition moves make clear that Clinton can and will do so, with actions parallelling, on his terms, those Kennedy took 32 years ago. For example: The announcement of a reorganized (and smaller)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Willingboro Township Council voted unanimously Tuesday to rescind its controversial decision to rename the John F. Kennedy Center - the town's former high school - as the Barack Obama Center. Cheers erupted among the more than 200 people who filled the bleachers and chairs at the JFK Center's auditorium, where the meeting was held. Many said they had come to protest a name change they viewed as disrespectful of a beloved president. The uproar wasn't about President Obama in this predominantly middle-class black community of 31,000, which had voted for the nation's first black president twice.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Joanne P. Wenger, 71, of Gloucester City, who marched in the inaugural parade for President John F. Kennedy on Jan. 20, 1961, in Washington, died of cancer Saturday, Aug. 23, at the ManorCare Health Services residential care facility in Washington Township. Born in Gloucester City, Miss Wenger graduated in 1961 from Gloucester Catholic High School, where she was a member of its All Girl Drum and Bugle Corps, nephew Robert K. McGinley Jr. said. After Kennedy was sworn into office, the Gloucester Catholic unit paraded down Pennsylvania Avenue past the reviewing stand at the White House.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
IRV CROSS slumped into the seat of his car that high-sky November afternoon, his football soul left in tatters somewhere on Franklin Field, his heart welling in his chest. He looked down at the radio grill when reality seeped in. The Eagles' defensive back was overwhelmed. Tears began trickling down his numb cheeks by the belief that he had just lost a friend. It's how the whole country felt. The prevailing emptiness gripped the country on Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963, as President John F. Kennedy's body lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
By almost any measure, it's safe to say William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. has had a remarkable legal career. First in his class at Harvard Law School in 1946. First African American to serve as a clerk for a Supreme Court justice. Transportation Secretary under President Gerald R. Ford, adviser to nine other presidents, and, finally, a corporate lawyer who routinely pulled down fees of $1,200 an hour. Coleman, a Philadelphia native, also was the first African American to go to work for an old-line Philadelphia law firm, single-handedly breaking the color barrier of the city's legal establishment.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
I was 10 when JFK was shot, so my "where were you?" memories are vivid. "Mom! Mom!" I shouted as a flashback film clip of a Kennedy interview flickered on the Motorola's minuscule screen. "President Kennedy's alive again!" I giggled. "He's sitting up in his coffin!" My fifth-grade wit earned not the applause I was going for, but my first (and, thus far, only) slap in the face. My mother was crying. It was abruptly clear that the black-and-white tragedy on TV had touched our family's heart.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The terrible tumult of that weekend 50 years ago, one that repelled, riveted, and ultimately reshaped a nation, began in Philadelphia with an ominous hush. Just past 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, Fred Donaldson, a 22-year-old rewrite man at the Evening Bulletin, checked the newsroom's bank of 11 teletype machines. Strangely, that formidable wall of noise, typically clattering with news reports, had gone eerily silent. "It was something I'd never seen before," Donaldson recalled last week.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
WE STARE at the screen as the motorcade turns into Dealey Plaza. We see the young president and his wife wave to an adoring crowd from the back of their limo. And we hold our breath. On cue, the shots ring out. And for the 50th year in a row, we watch Walter Cronkite tell us what we already know. We return to the scene of the crime every year like pilgrims to the hallowed shrine where their faith was born. Those of us of the "where-were-you-when" generation retell our stories to those too young to remember.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IN RESPONSE to Stuart Caesar's letter and his comment about JFK being a "conservative Republican," allow me to quote the former president defending liberalism: "If by a 'Liberal' they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people - their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights and their civil liberties - someone who...
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
WHEN I think of television and the assassination of the first president who made the medium his own, the first image is never of the handsome head snapping back, the pretty woman in the pink suit clambering onto the trunk of the moving car. It's not even of CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite. It's of a scrawny man in a crowded hallway, his face twisting as he's shot and killed on live TV as I sit, watching, at my father's feet. "Did you see that?" my father shouts, rising out of his chair as Lee Harvey Oswald sinks from sight.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
WHO killed President Kennedy? Lee Harvey Oswald, of course. All the evidence points to him, and no one else. Why then, after 50 years, are there still people who deny this fact? Because Oswald was a Marxist, who supported Castro and defected to the Soviet Union, that's why. Oswald was a member of the liberal left, and the left has never been able to accept that one of their own was responsible for the death of the president. It was always easier to live in denial, and blame the assassination on a right-wing conspiracy, which simply never existed.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|