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Jim Bunning

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SPORTS
July 20, 1989 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
"I was very intense about every performance," Jim Bunning recalled. "I thought it was a life-and-death situation at the time. " The Phillies loved that life-and-death approach when Bunning pitched for them, staining his hatband with sweat, muddying his uniform at the knee, scowling hard enough to melt the catcher's mask. The Phillies stopped loving that life-and-death approach, that mask-melting scowl, when Bunning managed for them in the minor leagues. So they sent a hatchet man to tell him he was fired in 1976.
NEWS
February 6, 2009 | Daily News staff writers Bob Warner and Bill Bender contributed to this report
PHILLIES Hall-of-Famer Jim Bunning threw his last major-league pitch in 1971, more than 37 years ago. But the tall right-hander still gets irritated when someone wants to pull him out of a big game. His arena now is the U.S. Senate, where Bunning has represented Kentucky the past 10 years, compiling a record as one of the most conservative members of Congress. (As former Daily News reporter Ron Goldwyn once described him, "Throws right. Votes far right. ") Bunning's term expires next year, and he appears to be battling the leadership of his own Republican Party for re-election support.
SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine it is 1964 again, and you are a righthanded hitter standing 60 feet, 6 inches from James Paul David Bunning. Good luck. There is a glare on his face that suggests you will be lucky to dribble one three inches in front of home plate. Then he rocks into that big, deliberate windup, arms wheeling up to the brim of his cap, then flying behind his back. Now here comes the baseball - out of a sidearm delivery so exaggerated, Bunning's right arm looks as if it must be 11 feet long.
NEWS
March 8, 1996
Yes, these words in praise of Jim Bunning come a day or so late. But, after all, the baseball Hall of Fame was years late in welcoming the onetime Phillies ace inside its walls. In remarks this week from his current workplace, the floor of Congress, the gentleman from Kentucky betrayed a touch of bitterness that he enters the Hall by the back door of a Veterans Committee vote, rather than the regular, baseball-writers election that was his due. But, then, Mr. Bunning always was a straight talker whose opinions had as much bite as his sidearm curve.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia man has agreed to plead guilty to sending threatening e-mail to U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning, the Hall-of-Fame Phillies pitcher. Bruce Shore, 51, signed a document on Aug. 6 expressing his wish to plead guilty to the federal charge, which carries a maximum prison sentence of two years and a maximum fine of $250,000. The February indictment, originally filed in Kentucky where Bunning serves, does not describe any e-mail that Shore sent. The indictment accused him of sending interstate communication "with the intent to annoy, abuse, threaten, and harrass any person who received the communication.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a city filled with change-up artists, Jim Bunning still throws it straight and hard. The Republican congressman from Kentucky recently angered some constituents when he said he would no longer root for the famed University of Kentucky basketball team. Kentucky coach Rick Pitino had introduced President Clinton at an election rally last year. Bunning dislikes Clinton, and accused Pitino in a faxed message of costing GOP nominee Bob Dole the election in Kentucky. Bunning took a lot of heat in his home state for dissing the popular Pitino, who has since departed for the Boston Celtics.
SPORTS
August 5, 1996 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty-two years after he cast his legend on a sun-baked Sunday much like this one, Jim Bunning experienced another perfect day. This time, though, he almost didn't make it through the first inning. Bunning, recalling his deceased parents and lamenting all he missed in the lives of his nine children, tearfully stumbled through the early moments of his acceptance speech yesterday as the former Phillies pitcher, along with Negro League star Bill Foster and two Baltimore Orioles managers of different eras, Earl Weaver and Ned Hanlon, were inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame.
NEWS
May 18, 2010
State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams receives another big campaign donation from a PAC. B1. In Kentucky, a major battle for ex-Phillie Jim Bunning's seat. A10.
NEWS
March 12, 2010
JIM BUNNING is a god! The senator from Kentucky is being vilified just because he had the guts to tell the truth. Why should I pay for something just so a bunch of whining slackers can get another freebie? It's no wonder Mr. Bunning doesn't want to run for re-election. He needs to join the other gods - Bush, Cheney and Palin - in the halls of Mount Olympus, where Democrats fear to tread. Stuart Caesar, Philadelphia
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SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
JIM BUNNING spent the first weekend in December in San Diego, a member of a 16-man committee voting on Golden Era players to be inducted into Baseball's Hall of Fame. Dick Allen needed 12 votes. He got 11. "I felt useless," Bunning seethed the other day, his voice crackling with anger. "It was the most disappointing 3 days I've ever spent in my life!" In his life? What about that weekend in September 1964, when the National League pennant was gurgling down the drain and Gene Mauch was pitching Bunning and Chris Short on 2 days' rest and the Phillies were drowning in a 10-game losing streak?
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
DICK ALLEN, a former MVP and seven-time All-Star, was announced as one of the 10 candidates eligible for induction to the National Baseball Hall of Fame through a veterans committee. Any candidate that receive votes on 75 percent of the ballots cast by the 16-member Golden Era Committee will earn election into the hallowed halls of Cooperstown. This winter, the veterans committee is selecting from players and executives whose contributions came during the "Golden Era," from 1947-72.
SPORTS
September 27, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Books, magazines, and newspapers are filled with stories about the 1964 Phillies' late-season collapse, and the general consensus is that manager Gene Mauch blew the pennant by overusing star pitchers Jim Bunning and Chris Short down the stretch. Fifty years later, many of the '64 Phillies disagree with that theory, pointing to an injury suffered by slugging first baseman Frank Thomas as the trigger to the 10-game tailspin, one that erased a 61/2-game lead in the National League.
SPORTS
September 3, 2014
PHILLIES NO-HITTERS Sept. 1, 2014: Cole Hamels (6 innings); Jake Diekman (1); Ken Giles (1); Jonathan Papelbon (1) at Atlanta, 7-0 Oct. 6, 2010: Roy Halladay, vs. Cincinnati, 4-0, NLDS May 29, 2010: Roy Halladay, at Florida, 1-0 (y) April 27, 2003: Kevin Millwood, vs. San Francisco, 1-0 May 23, 1991: Tommy Greene at Montreal, 2-0 Aug. 15, 1990: Terry Mulholland vs. San Francisco, 6-0 June 23, 1971: Rick Wise at Cincinnati, 4-0 June 21, 1964: Jim Bunning at New York, 6-0 (y)
SPORTS
July 21, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
THE NUMBERS live on, in infamy. Whisper "6 1/2-game lead, 12 games to play," in Kensington or King of Prussia; after services at St. Paul's or Mishkan Shalom; in a gym; on a whim; in a park; in the dark; and you will hear an echo, groaning with sadness, "1964 Phillies!" Everybody knows they lost the next 10 in a row, blew the National League pennant, turned those World Series tickets they'd printed into cheap, colorful, cardboard memorabilia. Broke some hearts that never mended.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
ISSUE | JIM BUNNING Perfect account of a perfect game I read the first two paragraphs of Bill Lyon's column about Jim Bunning's June 1964 no-hitter not once, not twice, but three times ("Not-so-silent perfection," June 15). What a beautiful piece of writing. To capture the memory of that breathtaking day was something only Bill Lyon could do. Thank you for bringing Lyon back to commemorate the day for those of us who hung on every pitch, holding our breath until the last triumphant out. |Jane Kieser, Lansdale ISSUE | FRACKING Happy talk The rose-colored glasses David Holt wears when it comes to fracking are sadly blinding him to the growing body of evidence showing that this extreme, fossil-fuel extraction process poisons drinking water, destroys small-town infrastructure, and may have a link to earthquakes ("Natural-gas production is saving jobs in Pa.," June 18)
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Bunning's life, in so many ways, has been perfectly pitched. He played 17 big-league seasons, won 100-plus games in each league, and is in baseball's Hall of Fame. He was an elected official in his native Kentucky for 32 years, the last 12 as a U.S. senator. He was a sports agent, a minor-league manager, an insurance broker. He's been married 62 years, has nine children, 35 grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren. But there have also been a few sour notes. Bunning's only real shot at a World Series ended when the 1964 Phillies collapsed, inexplicably blowing a 61/2-game lead with just 12 to play.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too often, Mike Adams said, he has heard somber news from a doctor about his right shoulder. "I was already planning for the worst based on history and how my shoulder was feeling," Adams said. "But getting those results back . . . I'm optimistic again. " There is no damage to Adams' rotator cuff, the part of the shoulder that required surgery last July. Still, the Phillies righthander will require a cortisone injection later this week in an effort to strengthen the area around his labrum, which is fraying, according to an MRI examination.
SPORTS
August 14, 2011
Imagine watching the 2011 Phillies starting rotation through the eyes of a Hall of Fame pitcher. Imagine being the only other man in franchise history to pitch a perfect game and studying the game of the guy who duplicated your remarkable feat. Jim Bunning does not have to imagine. Best known in Philadelphia for pitching a perfect game against the New York Mets on Father's Day in 1964, Bunning admits to being quite fond of the group of starting pitchers who make up the 2011 Phillies rotation.
SPORTS
August 9, 2011
LOS ANGELES - More than 45 former players from eight decades of Phillies baseball will return to Citizens Bank Park this weekend for the team's annual alumni event. On Friday, John Kruk will be inducted into the team's Wall of Fame during a pregame ceremony. Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt, among other honorees, will be in attendance to celebrate Kruk's appointment. On Sunday, a special ceremony will honor Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Kalas. A statue dedicated in his memory will be unveiled with members of his family and the alumni looking on as guests.
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