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Jim Eisenreich

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SPORTS
September 22, 1995 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in the giddy days of June, when the Phillies were in first place and most of their roster wasn't seeking medical attention, rookie lefthander Michael Mimbs typified the club's stupefying start. Mimbs had never pitched above the double-A level before winning six of his first seven starts this year. Then he was removed from the rotation after a midseason funk. Last night, however, the Georgia native regained his early-season form as the Phillies defeated the Florida Marlins, 3-1, at Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
November 25, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Eisenreich, who signed with the Phillies because they were the only club seriously interested and went on to play in 153 games for the National League champions, agreed to a one-year contract yesterday that doubled his salary. The free-agent outfielder, one of the key winter acquisitions who sparked the Phils' remarkable 1993 season, signed a deal with the Phillies that will pay him $1.2 million in 1994. The club will have an option for 1995 at the same salary. "I'm extremely delighted to be going back to Philadelphia," said Eisenreich yesterday from his home in Blue Springs, Mo. Platooned in right with Wes Chamberlain, Eisenreich hit .318 with seven homers and 54 RBIs.
SPORTS
June 28, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shawn Boskie pitched better last night. That, of course, is like saying Eddie the Eagle landed a foot farther down the hill. The Phillies pitcher had been shelled for 12 runs in the 3 1/3 innings that comprised his two most recent starts. To improve on that, he required little more than a pulse. Hardly overpowering, but exceedingly resourceful and occasionally fortunate, Boskie rebounded strongly, limiting the Marlins to six hits and a single run in nine innings while the Phillies defeated Florida, 5-1, at Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
October 17, 2008 | by Pete Dorchak
Oct. 17, 1993/SkyDome Phillies 6, Blue Jays 4 The Phillies tie the World Series at one game a piece thanks to a five-run third inning capped off by a three-run home run from Jim Eisenreich. Lenny Dykstra added a home run and made two spectacular, wall-crashing catches in consecutive innings as the Phillies win, 6-4, and shift the series north of the border. -- The Daily News will remember past moments from each date in Phillies postseason history as they continue their 2008 playoff run.
SPORTS
August 12, 1993 | by Bill Conlin, Daily News Sports Columnist
Before World War II, "Made in Japan" was longhand for junk. Every carnival prize rack was crammed with it. On Dec. 7, 1941, we learned the Japanese had been withholding the good stuff. We didn't have anything to match the Zero fighter or the shallow- running torpedoes that took out the Pacific Fleet anchored at Ford's Island until late 1942. The American League gets the same bum rap. These guys don't play real baseball. They are a "Made-in-Cleveland collection of beer-league teams, guys who swing from the heels, miss cutoff men and charge the mound at the rumor of a close pitch.
NEWS
October 18, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies developed an intimate relationship with the outfield wall at SkyDome last night. Four times they ran into it, twice they hit balls over it, and along the way they defeated the Toronto Blue Jays, 6-4, to tie the World Series at one game apiece. Jim Eisenreich, a gentle and clean-shaven Phillie, ripped the game open for the Phils in the third inning, when he smashed a three-run home run off Dave Stewart. Lenny Dykstra - who had two brushes with the outfield wall on defense and two distinguished catches - gave the Phillies a vital insurance run with a solo homer in the seventh.
SPORTS
July 21, 1993 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Eisenreich, he of the big-time, nationally famous, loud, burly, tough- as-nails Philadelphia Phillies, had a baseball dream once. It was not a dream about being where he is at this moment, in a pennant race with the big, bad Phillies. Jim Eisenreich's dream was fairly simple. He wanted to play baseball with his younger brother, Charlie, who was born when Jim was 5 years old. "I remember the first day he was in the house, I asked my mother when I could start wrestling with him," Eisenreich said yesterday, smiling at the memory.
SPORTS
August 14, 2011
John Kruk became the newest Phillie to join the club's Wall of Fame before Friday night's game against Washington. A bronze plaque bearing Kruk's likeness was unveiled by Jim Eisenreich as the Phillies began Alumni Weekend. The 50-year-old Kruk, who played for the raucous 1993 team that lost to Toronto in the World Series, was introduced by Darren Daulton. "This is the greatest place I've ever been," Kruk said as he addressed the crowd at Citizens Bank Park. "I met my wife here.
SPORTS
December 8, 1995 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The Phillies earned their first win of 1996 over the New York Mets yesterday. Just hours after it appeared the Phillies and outfielder Jim Eisenreich were hopelessly far apart in negotiations for a new contract, both sides compromised in time to beat last night's deadline for offering salary arbitration. Eisenreich agreed to a one-year contract for $1.2 million, virtually the same deal he had in 1995. If an agreement had not been reached, Eisenreich would have become ineligible to re-sign with the Phillies until May 1, 1996.
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SPORTS
December 11, 2012 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NASHVILLE - Twenty years have passed since Lee Thomas pulled off one of the greatest roster overhauls in Phillies history. With a shoestring budget and a barren farm system, Thomas made six offseason additions - four free-agent signings and two trades - that helped trigger the Phillies' transformation from a last-place team in 1992 to National League champions in 1993. It started with a November expansion-draft trade for lefthander Danny Jackson that sent Joel Adamson and Matt Whisenant to the Florida Marlins, and concluded with a mid-January free-agent signing of outfielder Jim Eisenreich for $675,000.
SPORTS
September 30, 2011 | BY TOM MAHON, mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF YOUNGSTERS are taking the Phillies' success in stride. But it wasn't too long ago that there wasn't much to cheer about. Just 15 years ago, the Phils lost 95 games. That team's everyday lineup: Gregg Jefferies at first, Mickey Morandini at second, Kevin Stocker at shortstop , Todd Zeile at third, Benito Santiago catching, Pete Incaviglia in left, Ricky Otero in center, and Jim Eisenreich in right. Pitcher Curt Schilling had the most wins of any starter at 9-10. The others: Mike Williams (6-14)
SPORTS
August 14, 2011
John Kruk became the newest Phillie to join the club's Wall of Fame before Friday night's game against Washington. A bronze plaque bearing Kruk's likeness was unveiled by Jim Eisenreich as the Phillies began Alumni Weekend. The 50-year-old Kruk, who played for the raucous 1993 team that lost to Toronto in the World Series, was introduced by Darren Daulton. "This is the greatest place I've ever been," Kruk said as he addressed the crowd at Citizens Bank Park. "I met my wife here.
SPORTS
October 17, 2008 | by Pete Dorchak
Oct. 17, 1993/SkyDome Phillies 6, Blue Jays 4 The Phillies tie the World Series at one game a piece thanks to a five-run third inning capped off by a three-run home run from Jim Eisenreich. Lenny Dykstra added a home run and made two spectacular, wall-crashing catches in consecutive innings as the Phillies win, 6-4, and shift the series north of the border. -- The Daily News will remember past moments from each date in Phillies postseason history as they continue their 2008 playoff run.
SPORTS
October 10, 2008 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
Reprinted from yesterday's Daily News: IN A TIP of the cap to the 1993 Phillies, who came oh-so-close to winning the World Series, the club has summoned an integral part of that team, Jim Eisenreich, to toss out the ceremonial first pitch before Game 2 of the National League Championship Series tomorrow. Regrettably, Eisenreich will be sitting with his 10-year old son in the stands and not down at the end of the bench, where he would be a welcomed addition given the way he always clobbered Dodgers pitching.
SPORTS
December 3, 2002 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What do Carmelo Martinez, Wally Backman, Rex Hudler and Jerry Spradlin have in common? All of them are part of the Phillies' less-than-stellar history of free-agent signings. Prior to yesterday, and the landing of Jim Thome, the Phils had not been particularly active or successful in the free-agent marketplace. They have gone after few high-profile players, and landed even fewer of them. And on those rare occasions when they have taken the big financial gamble, they have often wound up regretting it. Two words: Lance Parrish.
SPORTS
April 16, 1998 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The Marlins were milling around the batting cage. Phillies starter Curt Schilling walked by. Soon, he was engaged in an affable conversation with Jim Eisenreich. It is unusual for the famously focused Schilling to engage in banter on the day he is scheduled to pitch. But Eisenreich is a special person. He remains one of the most popular players to wear a Phillies uniform in recent memory. And, besides, there was an issue to be settled. Schilling insisted Eisenreich had never gotten a hit off him. Eisenreich insisted he doubled against Schilling last season.
SPORTS
April 16, 1998 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During batting practice yesterday afternoon at steamy Pro Player Stadium, Curt Schilling and his old buddy Jim Eisenreich got into some friendly trash-talking. "You've never gotten a hit off me," Schilling informed his former Phillies teammate. "Yes, I have," Eisenreich replied. "You're 0 for 2," Schilling said adamantly. "I'm positive I've got at least one hit off you," Eisenreich said. Eisenreich was temporarily correct - he was 1 for 6 in his career against Schilling.
SPORTS
October 22, 1997 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Lords of Baseball have brought us three divisions and wild-card playoff berths. And for that reason, we have the sport's fourth-best team facing its eighth-best team in this World Series. That about explains last night's shaggy Game 3 at frigid Lambeau, er, Jacobs Field. In the end, the Florida Marlins pulled out a wild 14-11 win over the Cleveland Indians by scoring seven times in the top of the ninth inning to break a 7-7 tie. The Indians scored four times in the bottom of the inning as the game took on the unmistakable feel of that crazy 15-14 game between the Phillies and the Blue Jays in the 1993 Series.
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