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Jim Fregosi

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March 7, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Behind the backstop, the baseball lifers gathered; the scouts and crosscheckers from nearly two dozen major-league organizations, more than normal for an average midweek exhibition game between the Phillies and the Braves. On the aisle in row 8, section 111, amid all the stopwatches and radar guns and notebooks that recorded the rising and falling fortunes of veterans and prospects, a wide-brimmed straw hat had been placed on the empty seat. Jim Fregosi should have been sitting there.
SPORTS
July 28, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Anaheim Angels announced yesterday that they plan to retire the uniform number worn by Jim Fregosi, who had a 14-year career with the team as a shortstop and manager. Fregosi, 56, now a special assistant to San Francisco Giants general manager Brian Sabean, wore No. 11 for the Angels. The number will be retired before Saturday's game against the Boston Red Sox. Fregosi managed the Phillies from early in the 1991 season until he was fired after the 1996 season. He led the team to the World Series in 1993, losing to Toronto.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - In 1992, Jim Fregosi's second year as manager, the Phillies lost 92 games. Only two teams in baseball had more losses. Expectations, of course, were not high in 1993. No one outside the Phillies clubhouse believed the team would be any different from how they were in 1992. Consider the forecast in Sports Illustrated's "Baseball Preview" issue that spring. That last two words are still etched in the brain of least one teenage baseball fan-turned-sports writer more than 2 decades later: "Philadelphia's offseason acquisitions - pitcher Danny Jackson, rightfielder Pete Incaviglia- were not only insufficient; they were also infinitesimal.
SPORTS
April 17, 1994 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies could use Wes Chamberlain's offense, but they're probably going to have to wait a few more games before the rightfielder joins the team. Chamberlain, who had arthroscopic knee surgery last month, is on a rehabilitation assignment with single-A Clearwater. On Friday, he had his second straight three-hit game, including a double and a homer, and lifted his average to .438 (7 for 16). "He's not there to work on his hitting," manager Jim Fregosi said. "We want to see how he runs and how he reacts to playing the outfield.
SPORTS
June 26, 1992 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mariano Duncan is hitting .283 and has started all but two games this season. He leads the club in doubles (20) and total bases (119), as well as in clubhouse fights (1) and ugly clothes (he says he can dress in a new outfit every day for a year and never wear the same one twice). But it is off the field that Duncan has really opened some eyes. He is a powerful and cheerful clubhouse presence. On a team where many veterans are quick to criticize young players anywhere but to their face, Duncan is not afraid to speak out. "I think his attitude and professionalism has impressed me more than anything he has done on the field," said Phils manager Jim Fregosi.
SPORTS
September 3, 1995 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillies righthander Mike Grace said he pitched "like a robot" in his major-league debut Friday night. Jim Fregosi, his manager, was far less critical. Fregosi was impressed, even though Grace allowed four runs - two of which scored after he left the game - in 4 1/3 innings and was the losing pitcher in the Phillies' 6-3 defeat to the San Diego Padres. "I liked what I saw," Fregosi said. "He went at the hitters pretty well, didn't walk anybody, and I thought they got some cheap hits off him. " Grace, who underwent four operations to his right elbow between 1991 and 1993 and was pitching on the single-A level last season, allowed eight hits.
SPORTS
March 1, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has eight infielders hanging around, thinking they should be regulars. He has four positions to put them in, thanks to the genius of Abner Doubleday. So how would you like to be Phillies manager Jim Fregosi, a man whose supreme challenge is to fit those eight infielders into those four spots? Correct answer: No thanks. "You know, I'm a guy who likes to play everybody," the manager said. "And I like to keep everybody as happy as I possibly can. But juggling all the infielders I've got is almost an impossible job. " What's so impossible about it?
SPORTS
October 6, 1993 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They were a solid veteran team with a powerful offense, tested veterans, shaky pitching, and a gruff, take-charge manager. Those were the California Angels of 1979. They were guided by Jim Louis Fregosi and their now-faded credentials make them sound a bit like the Phils of 1993, the only other playoff team Fregosi has managed. But the Phils' manager, now 51, says he is much different than the 37-year- old, second-year manager who directed the Angels to their first AL West crown.
SPORTS
July 11, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Barry Bonds set himself in the batter's box, Jim Fregosi held up four fingers. Nothing unusual about an intentional walk to the National League's best player. Except that it was the first inning. "I'll walk Barry Bonds every time I get the chance," said Fregosi. "If there's not someone standing on that pillow (first-base bag), I'll walk him. He's the best player in the game. " There were two outs and a runner at second when Bonds came up in the first. "That's the way we always handle Barry," laughed winning pitcher Tommy Greene.
SPORTS
October 24, 1993 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stubborn man, that Jim Fregosi. Play the same players in the same roles at the same points in the game. He leaves himself as little free will as possible. But even Fregosi cannot preordain every managerial move. Last night he had choices at key junctures, tough choices, more of them than in the five previous games combined. Most of them, of course, were mere prelude to his final fateful decision - calling on Mitch Williams. But they got him to that point. In order: How long to stay with starting pitcher Terry Mulholland?
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SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - That's the part of golf you have to enjoy, Dave Cash was saying. Every bad shot brings a chance to make up for it, to hit one better than was previously possible. Sitting next to him was Robert Person, finishing off a paper plate of food. "You guys weren't even born when I started playing," Cash said. The former second baseman laughed. It was 1969 when he broke icnto the big leagues. Sept. 13, Forbes Field, 10,440 Pittsburghers in the stands. He was 21 years old. Person was born 3 weeks later in Lowell, Mass.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Behind the backstop, the baseball lifers gathered; the scouts and crosscheckers from nearly two dozen major-league organizations, more than normal for an average midweek exhibition game between the Phillies and the Braves. On the aisle in row 8, section 111, amid all the stopwatches and radar guns and notebooks that recorded the rising and falling fortunes of veterans and prospects, a wide-brimmed straw hat had been placed on the empty seat. Jim Fregosi should have been sitting there.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
SOMETIMES, the marriage between a man and his times is perfect. It is what you think about when you think about Jim Fregosi and the 1993 Phillies - about a team that lived up to its hard-living/hard-playing/hard-staring caricature, and about a manager who manipulated them into champions. On the day he died, following a series of strokes suffered while on an MLB alumni cruise in the Caribbean, the tributes to Fregosi were as numerous as they were heartfelt. Player, coach, manager, scout - Fregosi lived baseball and he loved baseball, and especially baseball people.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - In 1992, Jim Fregosi's second year as manager, the Phillies lost 92 games. Only two teams in baseball had more losses. Expectations, of course, were not high in 1993. No one outside the Phillies clubhouse believed the team would be any different from how they were in 1992. Consider the forecast in Sports Illustrated's "Baseball Preview" issue that spring. That last two words are still etched in the brain of least one teenage baseball fan-turned-sports writer more than 2 decades later: "Philadelphia's offseason acquisitions - pitcher Danny Jackson, rightfielder Pete Incaviglia- were not only insufficient; they were also infinitesimal.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. – The bad times far outweighed the good during Jim Fregosi's managerial tenure with the Phillies, and even then he was able to make you believe he was the smartest man in the room. He had weaknesses, but he still made you think he was as strong as his opinions. His ego was so immense that it became one of his nicknames – "Ego" instead of "Frego" - and still, he was a human magnet. Fregosi, 71, died Friday morning in a Miami hospital after suffering multiple strokes Sunday during a Caribbean cruise.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Fregosi, 71, a baseball lifer who guided an eccentric Phillies team from last place to National League champions in 1993 and parlayed an all-star playing career into four managerial jobs and an influential scouting position, died Friday morning. Mr. Fregosi suffered multiple strokes last week during a Major League Baseball alumni cruise and was airlifted from the Cayman Islands to a Miami hospital, where he was taken off life support Thursday. "He had that special gift as a manager that made you want to get to the field and play your [butt]
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Update: Former Phillies manager Jim Fregosi died Friday morning after being removed from life support Thursday, according to MLB.com. Fregosi, who led the team to the National League pennant in 1993, suffered a severe stroke earlier this week during a Caribbean cruise. "He passed away at 2:36 a.m. [ET]," his son, Jim Fregosi Jr., told the site. "Went in peace with no pain. " CLEARWATER, Fla. - The news, no matter who you asked Thursday at Bright House Field, was not good.
SPORTS
April 8, 2013
It has been 20 years since Daulton, Dykstra, Kruk, Hollins, Mitchy-Poo, and Schilling captivated the city with an improbable worst-to-first run that did not end until Toronto's Joe Carter launched a World Series-ending home run into the left-field seats at the SkyDome. Throughout this season, The Inquirer will profile one of the cast of characters from that unforgettable team. This week's profile: Jim Fregosi. Age: 71. Current job: In his 13th season as special assistant to the general manager with the Atlanta Braves.
SPORTS
September 28, 2011
Charlie Manuel (2005-11) 645 Gene Mauch (1960-68) 645 Harry Wright (1884-93) 636 Danny Ozark (1973-79) 594 Jim Fregosi (1991-96) 431 SOURCE: Phillies
SPORTS
October 29, 2010
THE PHILLIES won 97 games this year, more than any other team in baseball, and Charlie Manuel won't win manager of the year, because the voters are always looking for who did the most with the least, because it makes for a niftier story. Yo, I'm here to tell you that Charlie Manuel is the best Phillies manager in the last 50 years. Maybe forever! Been here 6 years, in the playoffs the last 4, in the World Series twice. Won it once. His teams are 544-428 in the regular season, a .560 percentage and that is the last decimal point you are going to find in this tribute.
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