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Jim Thorpe

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SPORTS
March 20, 1986 | By John P. Harris Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
When things mesh as smoothly as they did last night against Jim Thorpe in the PIAA Class A Eastern final at Reading High, Bristol is a team to be feared. The Warriors kept the basketball moving, even if it meant ignoring the irrepressible Wayne Keys once or twice down the court. They made certain to provide dead-eye shooters Rob Perry, Darrin Bell and the muscle-bound Keys with their shares of jumpers. And they leaned heavily on lanky Charles DeShield, the junior center who has a way of redirecting the trajectory of shots taken by the opposition.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a swami named Kirtanananda Bhaktipada came here last month bearing architectural drawings for a proposed "City of God" on a nearby mountaintop, he looked down upon this picture-perfect Victorian village that seems frozen in time and proclaimed it "beautiful. " At which local residents who had come to see the swami in person cried out, "We don't want you here!" Nothing has happened since then to change the kind of welcome the Hare Krishnas can expect if they purchase a 425-acre resort and build an exotic walled city to house 12,000, more than tripling the population of Jim Thorpe.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
For the last quarter-century, the sons of the great Native American athlete Jim Thorpe have tried to persuade the picturesque northeastern Pennsylvania town bearing their father's name to return his remains to Shawnee, Okla., where he asked to be buried. But their pleas have fallen on deaf ears. Now they are taking their case to federal court in Scranton. Here's hoping they succeed. Born in 1888 on the Sac and Fox Indian reservation (now part of Oklahoma), Jim Thorpe came to Pennsylvania to attend the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a boarding school designed to assimilate Indian children into the white mainstream.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Thorpe's sons asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to overturn a ruling that prevents them from moving the great American Indian athlete's remains from the Pennsylvania town that bears his name to the Oklahoma tribal lands where he was born. In a 128-page filing, William Thorpe and Richard Thorpe, as well as the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, argued that a Philadelphia-based appeals court last year wrongly interpreted a law designed to protect the remains of American Indians.
NEWS
January 3, 2000 | By B.G. Kelley
Tomorrow night the football bowl season culminates with the national collegiate championship game between Florida State and Virginia Tech. College football can chalk up another successful season. The college game can track its present-day popularity in part to two men: A soft-spoken Sac and Fox Indian and a gruff-speaking coach. Together they not only put a tiny Indian school in Pennsylvania on the football map but they also lifted college football to glory and drama. Jim Thorpe grew into one of the most talented football players and athletes of all time - thanks in large measure to Glenn S. "Pop" Warner, the coach who mentored him to manhood.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
For the last quarter-century, the sons of the great Native American athlete Jim Thorpe have tried to persuade the picturesque northeastern Pennsylvania town bearing their father's name to return his remains to Shawnee, Okla., where he asked to be buried. But their pleas have fallen on deaf ears. Now they are taking their case to federal court in Scranton. Here's hoping they succeed. Born in 1888 on the Sac and Fox Indian reservation (now part of Oklahoma), Jim Thorpe came to Pennsylvania to attend the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a boarding school designed to assimilate Indian children into the white mainstream.
SPORTS
May 26, 1999 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
The parade was 45 years ago, but Jack Kmetz remembers it as if it were yesterday. Dressed in his baseball uniform, he and the other Little Leaguers marched up Route 903, just behind the high school band and the Legionnaires and the VIPs and just ahead of the hearse carrying the body of James Francis Thorpe. Four years after he was named the Greatest Athlete of the Half-Century by the Associated Press and two years after he died of a heart attack at age 65, Thorpe was put to rest in this tiny town at the southern edge of the Poconos.
SPORTS
July 3, 1996 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this Olympic summer, the idle old men who congregate on the benches at the foot of Broadway Street find themselves musing about the sad fate of Jim Thorpe, and about the curious way their town came to bear the name of the great Indian athlete. If booming Atlanta is a symbol of the new money-driven Olympics, then this musty old Pennsylvania railroad town, a charming but spiritually sagging community, remains in a way a reflection of its simpler past. At a time when multimillionaire athletes enrich themselves with Olympic glory, here is a town named for a man who lost two gold medals because he'd been paid $5 a game to play semipro baseball.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old boy washing the windows of a Center City high-rise apartment with a brother and a cousin plummeted 15 stories to his death yesterday afternoon. Stoney Acevedo, of Jim Thorpe, was working on the south side of the 20-story Penn Center House at 20th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard shortly after 3 p.m. when his rigging collapsed and he fell onto a sidewalk. "Everything came down," said Detective Fred Litchendorf of the Central Detective Division. "The whole harness and everything fell to the ground.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Will Williamson, Inquirer Staff Writer
This town wants you to know that, although it reveres his memory, it offers more than the mausoleum of "the greatest athlete in the world. " How it came to harbor Jim Thorpe's remains - and change its name from Mauch Chunk to that of the famed athlete - is an intriguing tale in itself. But when you arrive here today, you feel a spirit more of revitalization than commemoration. It is manifest in the bright paint of the 19th-century houses on Broadway, restored to their Victorian loveliness (instead of being covered with fake fronts resembling chalets, which one consulting firm recommended several years ago as a way of furthering a town nickname, "The Switzerland of America")
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
JAMES "JIM" THORPE, a former limousine driver and fork-lift operator who cared deeply for his family, died Wednesday, March 23. He was 101. Mr. Thorpe was born July 26, 1914, in Rocky Mount, N.C., to Willie and Lola Thorpe. One of several siblings, Mr. Thorpe came to Philadelphia as a young man searching for opportunities to work. Here, he met Allie Mae Lee Thorpe, his wife of 75 years. She died in 2012. The Thorpes, who lived near 55th Street and Lansdowne Avenue in West Philadelphia, had one child, Jamesina Thorpe-Smith, who died of cancer in 1991.
NEWS
March 26, 2016
ISSUE | CARLISLE INDIAN SCHOOL Children who never had a chance My father, Harold E. Parker, attended the Carlisle Indian Industrial School ( "Those kids never got to go home," Sunday). I visited Carlisle several years ago, and my most indelible memory was my visit to the children's cemetery. I counted the headstones in astonishment, but the ones that got to me were the two or three in a line that read "Unknown. " Unknown to the very people who were responsible for their general safety and well-being?
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Biscardi, 45, of Jim Thorpe, Pa., an Internet technology innovator and Philadelphia native, died Friday, Nov. 13, of injuries sustained in an auto accident in Penn Forest Township, Carbon County. Mr. Biscardi was alone in his car just before 8 p.m. when the vehicle left the right side of Behrens Road and struck a tree, according to state police at Lehighton. No other cars were involved. The accident was under investigation. Born in 1970, Mr. Biscardi, known as "Richie," grew up in the shadow of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia and lived in the city until moving to Jim Thorpe this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Alexander Kacala, For The Inquirer
Fall is upon us. Time for changing leaves, corduroy, and flannel, pumpkin spice something or other, and festivals galore. To truly enjoy the season, get out in the brisk weather before winter's forced hibernation. We have a jam-packed guide full of fall ideas citywide to keep you busy outdoors. From Brewerytown to Fishtown to the heart of Rittenhouse, we have your weekend mapped out wherever you choose to fall into Philadelphia. FRIDAY Selfie sticks allowed The Philadelphia Photo Arts Center wants you to get out the tripod and capture the moments that often go undocumented for this year's Sixth Annual Philly Photo Day . Photographers of all skill levels are encouraged to participate and submit their favorite shots taken during the daylong celebration.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Thorpe's sons asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to overturn a ruling that prevents them from moving the great American Indian athlete's remains from the Pennsylvania town that bears his name to the Oklahoma tribal lands where he was born. In a 128-page filing, William Thorpe and Richard Thorpe, as well as the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, argued that a Philadelphia-based appeals court last year wrongly interpreted a law designed to protect the remains of American Indians.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERESA TAFFE would give you her last penny. Her generosity and loving concern for others charmed family and friends. As a registered nurse, Theresa was able to express that love and concern to the patients of Lankenau Hospital, where she worked for many years. She died March 27 at age 85. She was living in the Bala Nursing Home and had previously lived in Wynnefield, West Philadelphia and South Philadelphia. Her husband, Anthony Taffe, was a prominent dog trainer who was a consultant and trainer for police K-9 units in Philadelphia, Camden and other cities.
NEWS
July 29, 2012
With the 2012 Olympics in full swing, it's time to look at notable moments in the history of the Games. 1. This American was the first Olympic champion of the modern era, securing the gold in the triple jump in 1896. a. Jim Thorpe. b. Thomas Burke. c. James Connolly. d. Walter Tewksbury. Who was the first female champion? a. Charlotte Cooper. b. Halina Konopacka. c. Helene Prevost. d. Fanny Rosenfield. 3. This American gymnast won three golds, two silvers, and one bronze all on one day in 1904 - competing with a prosthetic wooden leg. a. Archie Hahn.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
For the last quarter-century, the sons of the great Native American athlete Jim Thorpe have tried to persuade the picturesque northeastern Pennsylvania town bearing their father's name to return his remains to Shawnee, Okla., where he asked to be buried. But their pleas have fallen on deaf ears. Now they are taking their case to federal court in Scranton. Here's hoping they succeed. Born in 1888 on the Sac and Fox Indian reservation (now part of Oklahoma), Jim Thorpe came to Pennsylvania to attend the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a boarding school designed to assimilate Indian children into the white mainstream.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By William C. Kashatus
For the last quarter-century, the sons of the great Native American athlete Jim Thorpe have tried to persuade the picturesque northeastern Pennsylvania town bearing their father's name to return his remains to Shawnee, Okla., where he asked to be buried. But their pleas have fallen on deaf ears. Now they are taking their case to federal court in Scranton. Here's hoping they succeed. Born in 1888 on the Sac and Fox Indian reservation (now part of Oklahoma), Jim Thorpe came to Pennsylvania to attend the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a boarding school designed to assimilate Indian children into the white mainstream.
NEWS
November 8, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
It took 30 years of requesting, cajoling, demanding, and threatening, but in 1983 the family of Jim Thorpe was finally given back the two gold medals he won at the 1912 Olympic Games. Since then, it has been trying to get something else back - his body. For 25 years, family members have been working to persuade the people of this Carbon County borough to return the famous American Indian athlete's remains to a burial ground near Shawnee, Okla., where his father and many other relatives are buried.
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