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Jim Wilson

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NEWS
February 8, 1993 | By Eric Karabell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Even when his children were young, Jim Wilson hoped for this day. He loved to play basketball, and he had his children on the court soon after they were walking. Now if you want to catch the proud father watching his three girls on the court, you do not have to go to the Wilsons' pickup games near their home in Levittown. You can see them together at a Truman game, and all in the starting lineup. "Even in kindergarten, they were running full-court with us," recalled Jim Wilson, 46. "It was natural for them.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | By Mike Bradley, Special to The Inquirer
Jim Wilson was forced to change his outlook for the 1987-88 edition of Penncrest's boys basketball team before the Lions even bounced a ball. Penncrest won two games before being eliminated in last season's PIAA Class AAAA District 1 tournament and had high hopes for the forthcoming season. But 6-foot-5 star forward Tony Rainey transferred to Chester High and 6-6 starting center Kurt Meiser tore ligaments in his knee during the lacrosse season. Suddenly, the Lions were much tamer.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | By Jeremy Treatman, Special to The Inquirer
After having watched his team fall behind by 6, 10, and 14 points during the first half in its opening losses against Sun Valley, West Chester Henderson and West Chester East, Penncrest basketball coach Jim Wilson knew his team would have to jump out quickly against host Haverford School Friday night to avert a fourth straight loss. The Lions did just that, racing to a 16-8 lead after one quarter in a 72-65 victory over the Fords (1-2, 0-1 in the Central League). "It's really hard to play from behind.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By John Fosnocht, Special to The Inquirer
Len Jenkins had a game-high 16 points and pulled down 15 rebounds, but to hear Penncrest coach Jim Wilson tell it, it was guard Rich Nicholson and forward Jason Johnson who led the Lions to a 49-35 Central League win at Lower Merion Tuesday night. "The deciding factor in the game was turnovers," Wilson said. "In the first half we turned the ball over 11 times. At the half the score was only 21-18. In the second half we only turned the ball over five times. We were passing well.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Springfield Cougars devised a strategy to stop one of the Penncrest Lions' big scorers - Mike Oerther - on Friday night. The strategy worked. But two other Lions, Mike Boettcher and Kurt Meiser, picked up the slack and paced the team to a 51-43 win over the Springfield Cougars in a Central League contest. Boettcher keyed the Lions' scoring effort with 19, while Meiser dominated the inside game, collecting 20 rebounds. "The Central League is a tough league, and it is always difficult to win on the road," said Jim Wilson, Penncrest coach.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
According to Penncrest coach Jim Wilson, sometimes a little luck is just what a coach needs to keep his head straight. The Lions defeated Lower Merion Tuesday night 55-52 in a Central League clash, but had to wait for the Aces' Ryan Walcott's last-second 3-point attempt, which would have sent the contest into overtime, bounce in and out of the basket before celebrating. Penncrest led the Aces by 9 points with about two minutes remaining in the fourth period and appeared to be in complete control of the contest.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
According to Penncrest coach Jim Wilson, sometimes a little luck is just what a coach needs to keep his head straight. The Lions defeated Lower Merion Tuesday night 55-52 in a Central League clash, but had to wait for the Aces' Ryan Walcott's last-second 3-point attempt, which would have sent the contest into overtime, bounce in and out of the basket before celebrating. Penncrest led the Aces by 9 points with about two minutes remaining in the fourth period and appeared to be in complete control of the contest.
NEWS
January 30, 1989 | By Brian Mitchell Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
With 7 minutes, 3 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter of its Central League matchup with Upper Darby, Penncrest led the Royals, 41-29. The Lions were excited and were playing with confidence, but you could tell that coach Jim Wilson was uneasy on the bench. Most coaches would be ready to light the victory cigar with a 12-point lead late in the game, but Wilson had seen his squad self-destruct before. Wilson had witnessed games where his team had larger leads, with less time left in the contest, so he knew anything could happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Jim Wilson describes himself as "an adrenaline junkie. " It began with motocross racing when he was a teenager. Later in life, he became a mountain and ice climber, scaling peaks all over the world. "I really liked ice climbing," Wilson says. "It's like doing a dance with ice. The ice is always changing and different. " In 2009, realizing that he was courting more fatal risks, Wilson quit climbing and turned to mountain biking, which he had taken up in the mid-1990s to reform his body.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Penncrest head coach Jim Wilson's biggest challenge this season is creating a new attitude. Last season Wilson's Lions finished below .500 and out of the postseason picture. A major cause for the poor year, according to Wilson, was a philosophy by many of his players that put the individual ahead of the team. "We had some problems last year with people being disappointed with playing time. That can tear a team apart from what you're trying to accomplish as a group," Wilson said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Jim Wilson describes himself as "an adrenaline junkie. " It began with motocross racing when he was a teenager. Later in life, he became a mountain and ice climber, scaling peaks all over the world. "I really liked ice climbing," Wilson says. "It's like doing a dance with ice. The ice is always changing and different. " In 2009, realizing that he was courting more fatal risks, Wilson quit climbing and turned to mountain biking, which he had taken up in the mid-1990s to reform his body.
SPORTS
November 28, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
TULSA ATHLETIC director Ross Parmley has been placed on leave as the school investigates gambling allegations. University president Steadman Upham issued a brief statement saying Parmley will be on paid administrative leave during the investigation. Upham didn't offer details about whether the allegations involved sports betting or other forms of gambling. Upham says the university's executive vice president, Kevan Buck , will be the acting athletic director while Parmley is on leave.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | by Yardena Arar, Los Angeles Daily News
Kevin Costner remembers his reaction when a couple of writer friends proposed the idea of a Wyatt Earp film. "I said, 'Boys, I don't know if we should try and do this movie - it seems terribly familiar,' " Costner recalled. Even before his current two-film resurgence, Earp had been repeatedly iconized on celluloid, most notably in two classic Westerns - "Gunfight at the OK Corral" and "My Darling Clementine" - and a 1955-61 TV series starring Hugh O'Brian. But Costner became convinced there was another film to be made about the famed lawman-gunfighter, one that didn't focus on the shootout like the movies, or present Earp as an all-purpose good guy like the TV show.
NEWS
February 8, 1993 | By Eric Karabell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Even when his children were young, Jim Wilson hoped for this day. He loved to play basketball, and he had his children on the court soon after they were walking. Now if you want to catch the proud father watching his three girls on the court, you do not have to go to the Wilsons' pickup games near their home in Levittown. You can see them together at a Truman game, and all in the starting lineup. "Even in kindergarten, they were running full-court with us," recalled Jim Wilson, 46. "It was natural for them.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
In the words of St. James senior basketball player Joe Miller, Philadelphia Pharmacy made him an offer he couldn't refuse. The 6-foot, 5-inch all-Catholic forward has verbally committed to attend Pharmacy in the fall. "The school gave me everything I was looking for," said Miller, who chose Pharmacy over Cabrini and Widener. "First of all, I was looking for a career path and I think the pharmaceutical field is a promising area. "Plus, they offered me a better financial package than the other two schools.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | By Brian Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
For the first two quarters Friday night, the Penncrest Lions roared. At halftime, the visiting Lions were leading Upper Darby by 14 points, and it looked as though they would cruise to their first victory of the season. By the end of the Central League contest, the only Lion who was roaring was coach Jim Wilson. Oh, his team came through with the victory, defeating the Royals 59-50, but Wilson wasn't exactly overjoyed. "It seemed as though the kids lost interest in the game during the third quarter, and we let Upper Darby get back into it," Wilson said.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
According to Penncrest coach Jim Wilson, sometimes a little luck is just what a coach needs to keep his head straight. The Lions defeated Lower Merion Tuesday night 55-52 in a Central League clash, but had to wait for the Aces' Ryan Walcott's last-second 3-point attempt, which would have sent the contest into overtime, bounce in and out of the basket before celebrating. Penncrest led the Aces by 9 points with about two minutes remaining in the fourth period and appeared to be in complete control of the contest.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Mark Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
According to Penncrest coach Jim Wilson, sometimes a little luck is just what a coach needs to keep his head straight. The Lions defeated Lower Merion Tuesday night 55-52 in a Central League clash, but had to wait for the Aces' Ryan Walcott's last-second 3-point attempt, which would have sent the contest into overtime, bounce in and out of the basket before celebrating. Penncrest led the Aces by 9 points with about two minutes remaining in the fourth period and appeared to be in complete control of the contest.
NEWS
January 30, 1989 | By Brian Mitchell Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
With 7 minutes, 3 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter of its Central League matchup with Upper Darby, Penncrest led the Royals, 41-29. The Lions were excited and were playing with confidence, but you could tell that coach Jim Wilson was uneasy on the bench. Most coaches would be ready to light the victory cigar with a 12-point lead late in the game, but Wilson had seen his squad self-destruct before. Wilson had witnessed games where his team had larger leads, with less time left in the contest, so he knew anything could happen.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By John Fosnocht, Special to The Inquirer
Len Jenkins had a game-high 16 points and pulled down 15 rebounds, but to hear Penncrest coach Jim Wilson tell it, it was guard Rich Nicholson and forward Jason Johnson who led the Lions to a 49-35 Central League win at Lower Merion Tuesday night. "The deciding factor in the game was turnovers," Wilson said. "In the first half we turned the ball over 11 times. At the half the score was only 21-18. In the second half we only turned the ball over five times. We were passing well.
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