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Jingle Bells

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NEWS
December 12, 1989 | BY DAVE BARRY
The Holiday Season is here again, and "something special" is in the air. It's the aroma being given off by our mail person, who expired in our driveway several days ago while attempting to deliver 300 pounds of Holiday Greeting cards. These were mostly from businesses sending us heartfelt pre-printed bulk-mailed holiday wishes like: 'Tis now a time for Peace on Earth And Joy for all Mankind So let us know if we can help Unclog your sewer line. But we don't have time to read all our holiday wishes.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Monday's meeting, it was air conditioner 1, West Whiteland Board of Supervisors 0. The battle began during discussion of the Fairfield Place shopping center, when the dripping of an overhead air conditioner started to annoy the board. "Plop, plop, plop," it sputtered. Dispatched to fix the drip, Township Manager Stephen Ross and Public Works Director Joseph Roscioli placed a metal ashtray beneath the unit. "Ting, ting, ting," it intoned, louder than ever, prompting Supervisor Chairman Ronald L. White to break off discussion of the 250,000-square-foot shopping center and ask, "Could you put some paper in there so it stops the jingle bells?"
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
When are nine jingle bells, a red wooden box and a length of nylon string worth $1,950? When a panel of judges in Washington, D.C., says so. No, this was not another case of frivolous government purchases. The money was the prize awarded in the first annual Invent America contest to Rachel Smith, now a fourth grader at the McKinley Elementary School, for her invention of a musical box last year. The school and the district also shared in the prize. Twenty judges ruled that Rachel's instrument was the most creative and ingenious invention among third graders in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Whatever your taste in holiday music - country to classical, reggae to rap - you'll find fresh pickings to satisfy at CD shops. The offerings have grown so diverse, in fact, that you can virtually customize the festive sounds to complement a mood or event. Consider these options. Burned out on the holiday already? These globally minded discs offer a fresh, invigorating slant on the season: "World Christmas" (Metro Blue) - The whole earth is celebrating on this festive fusion set. Saxophonist Bob Berg trades licks with North Indian tabla master Zakir Hussain on "We Three Kings," Papa Wembo and Mino Cinelu put a lilting, Afro-spin on "Angels We Have Heard on High.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
They sold more than 115,000 copies of their debut album, "Meowy Christmas," last year and are likely to double the number with their new "Here Comes Santa Claws. " Yet Mike Spalla's musical prodigies continue to run from success. "Whenever they see me take out my microphone and tape recorder, they hide in the cupboards," said Spalla, speaking of the nine furry felines (whose names include Cheese Puff, Sprocket, Twizzler and Cueball) who make up his hit singing group, Jingle Cats.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was nowhere near a white Christmas, just rainy, and those weren't bells jingling, just key rings and change purses. But yesterday's Christmas carol sing-along and organ concert at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square was a welcome antidote to a gray day and a grim year. "Puts me in the spirit," said Teresa Souders of West Chester, among the more animated of the 133 concertgoers in the famous ballroom, a chandeliered affair built by Longwood founder Pierre S. du Pont in 1929 to house his 55-ton pipe organ.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHEATIN' HEARTS You may not know your spouse as well as you think. More than 75 percent of American men recently surveyed said they were certain their wives would never cheat - but nearly 35 percent of the women questioned said they already had. And the Esquire magazine survey, based on 4,000 readers who mailed in a questionnaire, showed a similar discrepancy between wives' expectations and husbands' infidelity. BUTTING OUT Smokers, the most successful method of quitting is do-it-yourself.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
On the first floor of the Main Line Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Paoli, Christmas carolers from the King of Prussia Rotary met Ernie Nagy, 77. After circling the floor, with Santa Claus and an elf handing out candy canes and bags of cookies, the 25 carolers made their way upstairs. There, waiting for them in the lobby of the second floor, was Nagy, with a nurse's aide by his side. Thin, long-legged and wearing a baseball cap, Nagy wanted to join in the caroling Thursday evening.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For her 10th birthday, on July 7, Cathleen Palmer asked for one of those toy cyberpets everybody has. She didn't get one. But for Christmas - a Christmas celebrated in July - she opened up a wrapped Nano Kitty, America's version of the Japanese Tamagotchi cyberpet. "I wanted this for my birthday, but I didn't get it," said Cathleen, smiling and pressing the buttons to make her new kitty "sleep. " As far as the Bucks County Bar Association is concerned, Cathleen is a mission accomplished.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
What, no decorated wagon to carry Santa Claus up York Road in Hatboro's annual holiday parade? No batteries to light up Rudolph's shiny red nose? Times are hard all over, and in Hatboro, Chamber of Commerce organizers are scrounging last-minute money to keep the holiday parade afloat. "If we don't get the funding, we will have to look at a smaller parade. We won't get the marching bands and the Mummers, because we wouldn't be able to pay for them," operations manager Meredith Baker said.
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TRAVEL
March 4, 2012
It was a dark and stormy night. Really. We always wanted to start a travel article with that. And after a particularly memorable trip to the Welsh countryside a few years ago, we can. Most of us travelers of a certain age have a large and growing repertoire of moments that make us smile - or make us groan with the irony of it all. It's those moments that cause many of us climb back into our cars or jump on trains or endure wearisome...
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
What, no decorated wagon to carry Santa Claus up York Road in Hatboro's annual holiday parade? No batteries to light up Rudolph's shiny red nose? Times are hard all over, and in Hatboro, Chamber of Commerce organizers are scrounging last-minute money to keep the holiday parade afloat. "If we don't get the funding, we will have to look at a smaller parade. We won't get the marching bands and the Mummers, because we wouldn't be able to pay for them," operations manager Meredith Baker said.
NEWS
December 25, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colin Booth had figured it out. The 8-year-old was sure that the real Santa was not at Springfield Mall, sitting merrily in a green chair opposite the Gap. The real Kris Kringle was at that very moment "flying somewhere over Russia," Colin said. So who was the very convincing white-bearded fellow in the red velvet suit just a few hundred yards away from Colin and his brother and sisters? "A helper," Colin said confidently. "But I'm still excited. I didn't even fall asleep yesterday.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was nowhere near a white Christmas, just rainy, and those weren't bells jingling, just key rings and change purses. But yesterday's Christmas carol sing-along and organ concert at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square was a welcome antidote to a gray day and a grim year. "Puts me in the spirit," said Teresa Souders of West Chester, among the more animated of the 133 concertgoers in the famous ballroom, a chandeliered affair built by Longwood founder Pierre S. du Pont in 1929 to house his 55-ton pipe organ.
SPORTS
October 20, 2008 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
MISTLETOE SHOULD hang from a doorway. "Jingle Bells" should play non-stop. Eggnog should be everyone's drink of choice. After all, as the head of household acknowledges, every day is like Christmas now for the Ryan clan, of Exton, Chester County. How could it not be? What a whirlwind half a year, roughly, has been experienced by the Ryans in general and specifically their middle son, Matt, a 2003 Penn Charter graduate. It was exciting enough when the 6-4, 220-pound Matt was selected third overall in the NFL draft by the Atlanta Falcons.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the dead of summer, but the cooling sound of Christmas carols drifts through Gary Russ' palatial Moorestown home. Despite the sticky August heat, more than a dozen tuxedoed men with red bow ties and cummerbunds and women draped in evening wear mill about the living-room piano, singing "Jingle Bells. " Santa's there, too. In fact, two Kris Kringles sing along, each sporting faded whiskers and a droopy red cap. What's happening this steamy but spirited night? Russ and his stylish company - all members of the 55-voice Garden State Chorale - have gathered with their new publicist for a photo shoot well in advance of their December holiday concert.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By Michael T. Dolan
A trip to my dentist's office usually is painful enough; but now that the holiday season - which seems to have begun shortly after midnight on Halloween - has rolled around, I dread the cleaning, chloride, and cavity-filling all the more. The smooth sounds of "easy listening" music are pumped into every sterile waiting room in the region, but now those smooth sounds have turned into a monotonous, not-so-easy-listening holiday jukebox. Call me Scrooge or the Grinch if you like, but does Philadelphia really need two radio stations that play holiday music continuously for six weeks or so?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Mark Nishita is everyone's secret keyboard weapon. Along with decade-long affiliations with the new-line Beastie Boys (the ones playing Franco-pop hip-hop through shredded amps) and Dan the Man Nakamura, Nishita has done heavy soul-brother sessions for everyone from the Bhagavan Das, the Wallflowers, Femi Kuti and Blackalicious. Under the moniker Money Mark he has made the retro sound of clavinets, clavichord, Hammond organ and Fender Rhodes a new-school necessity. He has also made a slate of solo LPs - Change Is Coming, Keyboard Repair, and Push The Button - remarkable for their sly, cartoony Latino feel; they sound like the missing link between Miles Davis' On the Corner and Le Q's theme for Sanford & Son. Like the Roots and Mos Def, Mark's current work - with fellow behind-the-scene-Beasties Eric Bobo and Mario Caldato Jr., we hope - promises to be a rock-out freak fest, the sort that would make Funkadelic's Hardcore Jollies seem soft in comparison.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | by Mark Lane
The Encyclopaedia Britannica may have moved from bicep-building bindings to airy blips of digital data, but a few reference works remain that can be aimlessly browsed by the fireplace. I speak here of "The Big Book of Christmas and Christmaslike Phenomena. " Brought out of the box for another year of reference, its duct-taped spine still supple, the book remains a font of holiday lore. You'd look in vain to find such patient expositions of the season's mysteries anywhere else.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of Bill Adler's home-brewed Christmas compilations as raucous parties where Big Maybelle is knocking back eggnogs with Mae West, Duke Ellington mixes with Dread Zeppelin, and Mojo Nixon is just as welcome as Murry the K. Since 1982, Adler - a former DJ, critic, rap historian, and spoken-word label exec - has crafted aural stocking-stuffers, obscure musical treats he sends to friends and music-biz contacts. Year-round he scours flea markets, cut-out bins, Caribbean music stores, and old TV and radio shows for his kitschy chestnuts.
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