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Joan Specter

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NEWS
January 30, 1996 | by Cynthia Burton, John M. Baer and Gar Joseph Daily News Staff Writers
She's smart, she's experienced, she's a size 4 and she's out of work. Stylish Republican Councilwoman at-large Joan Specter lost her seat in November to Franny Rizzo - proving only that the Rizzo name has more political potency in Philadelphia than the Specter name. During her 16-year tenure, Specter operated a successful pie business, offered legislation that was ignored by the Democrats but sometimes later adopted and generally comported herself in a dignified way despite ridicule from oafish members of the majority party.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council's Republicans got new leadership Wednesday, but the transfer of what is essentially token power went largely unnoticed until yesterday, when Joan Specter let it be known loudly and clearly that she is in charge of Council's three Republicans. "Nineteen eighty-six is a year not for plans, but for performance," the councilwoman told her colleagues. "As the new minority leader, I know that I speak for my colleagues when I promise the cooperation of the loyal opposition in moving plans forward.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joan Specter hates personality profiles. For 16 years, she has been an at-large member of Philadelphia City Council and is seeking another four-year term. By now, she has tired of questions about her long-ago days as a pie meister, cooking-school director and consumer-affairs commentator. Now she is a legislator, and she is in a tough race to remain one. Her running mates are fellow incumbent W. Thacher Longstreth, former congressman Charles Dougherty, Frank Rizzo Jr., and political newcomer Bert Lancaster.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Does somebody have it in for Joan Specter? Specter seems to think so. But many Republicans think the three-term councilwoman is simply going to extraordinary lengths to win re-election - and stepping on some GOP colleagues in the process. Her actions since winning renomination in May include a fund-raising appeal suggesting she's the target of a pro-life plot, a scolding letter to Republican ward leaders and a failed legal challenge to push at-large candidate Lawrence Tabas - ostensibly her running mate - into a less favorable ballot position.
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter has given a job to the wife of the man who gave Specter's wife a job. Philadelphia lawyer Carolyn Short, 49, was hired by Specter last month to serve as general counsel for the Senate Judiciary Committee, which Specter chairs. Short's husband, then-National Constitution Center executive director Joseph M. Torsella, hired Joan Specter, 70, as a $75,000-a-year fund-raiser for the center in 1998. The former member of Philadelphia City Council still holds the job. Both Specters are Republicans.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former City Councilwoman Joan Specter was hired for a $75,000-a-year fund-raising job with Philadelphia's National Constitution Center in 1998 shortly after her husband, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, helped push through a multimillion-dollar federal appropriation to build a new museum on Independence Mall. According to the center's records, Joan Specter interviewed for the job the same day her husband announced that a deal had been reached with the Clinton administration awarding the first installment of a total of $65 million in federal money for the museum project.
NEWS
July 24, 2007
IF I RECALL, years ago (when Joan Specter was a city councilwoman), she discovered that outlying counties were "gathering up" homeless people. They would take them to SEPTA trains, pay their rail fare and send them - one way - to Philly, thus alleviating their problems and increasing ours. Perhaps we ought to reverse the process. After all, the environment and outdoor living conditions are nicer in the 'burbs than they are in Philly. Harry Jay Katz, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 23, 1986
Unions are excellent - they protect the working person from sweatshops. But unions grow greedy like the capitalists and choke the economy. They are entitled to all the gains possible, within reason. The city's needs and the taxpayers' ability to pay also have to be considered. Teachers received a pay raise. They are not overpaid. Their job requires master's degrees obtained by years of education and costly tuition. Today teaching is a draining experience. Disruptive and undisciplined students defeat the learning process.
NEWS
April 23, 2001
Joan Specter's work at Constitution Center Having read Frederick Cusick's article about Joan Specter's hiring by the National Constitution Center (Inquirer, April 11), I am compelled to set the record straight. Let me repeat, for the benefit of your readers, facts that were repeatedly made clear to your reporter but were inexplicably omitted from the article. The article suggests that Mrs. Specter's hiring was some sort of political quid pro quo with Sen. Arlen Specter. But it curiously neglects to mention that Sen. Specter has championed the center for more than a decade.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sen. Arlen Specter is asking for $1,000 "emergency donations" to his wife Joan's City Council campaign, warning that anti-abortion "Extremists" are gearing up to defeat her in order to derail his presidential campaign. In a two-page letter mailed last week to about 3,000 past donors to his campaigns, Specter (R., Pa.) wrote, "Unless we raise enough money - almost $126,000 - for a last-minute advertising blitz, she could be defeated by the Extremists who are eager to hurt my campaign for president.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
DESPITE HIS penchant for the Boston brogue, Ben Affleck apparently can do a wicked Philly accent. At least according to William Goldenberg , the Philly-born editor who took home an Oscar recently for his work on the best-picture-winning "Argo. " Goldenberg also was nominated for his work on "Zero Dark Thirty. " According to Goldenberg, Affleck does a spot-on impression of him. "He's a great mimic," Goldenberg said. After Goldenberg, a Northeast High and Temple alum, won his Academy Award, he told reporters that his experience working in his father's Philly deli helped to teach him the importance of keeping all of the plates spinning in his professional career.
NEWS
February 16, 2009
YOU KNOW that thing about politics and strange bedfellows? Well there's a Pennsylvania race taking shape that could make for a strange, unique and maybe unusually cordial campaign because of politicians' bedfellows. Here's why. Former National Constitution Center boss Joe Torsella is a Democrat who just signaled his intent to run against Republican Arlen Specter next year. The two have similarities apart from their interest in the U.S. Senate - each one hired the other one's wife.
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Is Arlen Specter the funniest celebrity in Washington? Nope, he's the runner-up. That is not a joke. The longest-serving senator in Pennsylvania history turns out to have comic chops and a sense of humor that falls somewhere between Stephen Colbert and Henny Youngman. Specter said he called former Sen. Bob Dole, a fellow native of Russell, Kan., on his 84th birthday. "Bob, how do you feel?" Specter said he asked. "Arlen, I feel like a teenager - but I can't seem to find one!"
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Is Arlen Specter the funniest celebrity in Washington? Nope, he's the runner-up. That is not a joke. The longest-serving senator in Pennsylvania history turns out to have comic chops and a sense of humor that falls somewhere between Stephen Colbert and Henny Youngman. Specter said he called former Sen. Bob Dole, a fellow native of Russell, Kan., on his 84th birthday. "Bob, how do you feel?" Specter said he asked. "Arlen, I feel like a teenager - but I can't seem to find one!"
NEWS
July 24, 2007
IF I RECALL, years ago (when Joan Specter was a city councilwoman), she discovered that outlying counties were "gathering up" homeless people. They would take them to SEPTA trains, pay their rail fare and send them - one way - to Philly, thus alleviating their problems and increasing ours. Perhaps we ought to reverse the process. After all, the environment and outdoor living conditions are nicer in the 'burbs than they are in Philly. Harry Jay Katz, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter has given a job to the wife of the man who gave Specter's wife a job. Philadelphia lawyer Carolyn Short, 49, was hired by Specter last month to serve as general counsel for the Senate Judiciary Committee, which Specter chairs. Short's husband, then-National Constitution Center executive director Joseph M. Torsella, hired Joan Specter, 70, as a $75,000-a-year fund-raiser for the center in 1998. The former member of Philadelphia City Council still holds the job. Both Specters are Republicans.
NEWS
April 23, 2001
Joan Specter's work at Constitution Center Having read Frederick Cusick's article about Joan Specter's hiring by the National Constitution Center (Inquirer, April 11), I am compelled to set the record straight. Let me repeat, for the benefit of your readers, facts that were repeatedly made clear to your reporter but were inexplicably omitted from the article. The article suggests that Mrs. Specter's hiring was some sort of political quid pro quo with Sen. Arlen Specter. But it curiously neglects to mention that Sen. Specter has championed the center for more than a decade.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
Married to a U.S. senator, former City Councilwoman Joan Specter hasn't been a stay-at-home wife. She headed her own gourmet dessert firm, a company she built and later sold. When her Council tenure ended six years ago, she became a fund-raising consultant, then worked for the now-defunct Allegheny hospital chain. In short, she's had her own lengthy career. Yet at any point, Mrs. Specter knew it could have been said - unfairly or not - that she'd benefited from her husband's high-profile job, if not actual influence.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former City Councilwoman Joan Specter was hired for a $75,000-a-year fund-raising job with Philadelphia's National Constitution Center in 1998 shortly after her husband, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, helped push through a multimillion-dollar federal appropriation to build a new museum on Independence Mall. According to the center's records, Joan Specter interviewed for the job the same day her husband announced that a deal had been reached with the Clinton administration awarding the first installment of a total of $65 million in federal money for the museum project.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | By John Corr and Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) labeled as "atrocious" an item in yesterday's Washington Post that said he and Houston real estate entrepreneur Susan Menke were flirting during Specter's brunch on Tuesday for members of the Senatorial Trust at the convention. "He barges in, uninvited, and writes fiction," said Specter, married for 47 years to Joan Specter, a convention organizer and former city councilwoman, who was not at the brunch at their East Falls home. The account, by columnist Lloyd Grove, recalled that Specter, 70, sang "Don't Fence Me In" to Menke, 48, and deemed her "gorgeous.
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