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Job Interview

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BUSINESS
September 15, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Orlando Sentinel and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
The latest technology in job interviewing - an automated telephone answering service. The American Automobile Association, headquartered in Heathrow, Fla., reports that several of its clubs nationwide are using interactive voice response to screen job applicants. A California AAA club says the number of people responding to its job ads tripled in 18 months with the system, from 50 to 150, and managers filled positions in 40 percent less time. The technology is provided by AlignMark, a nationwide company based in Maitland, Fla. Master the job hunt Jobtrak.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job interviewers are looking for something. But what? And how do you answer those intentionally tricky questions? Here are ways to navigate the minefield of the interview room. Interviewers want job applicants to be likable, to stand out, to ask questions. That's part of what business writer Jeff Haden says in this LinkedIn post titled "What Interviewers Wish They Could Tell Every Job Candidate. " At the end of an interview, according to Haden, employers should like it when you "do what great salespeople do and ask for the job. " Then, follow up. Employers appreciate a note of thanks.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
To Robert Long, 20, the job interview is "just about the worst experience of my life. " For Rosa Solomon, 41, the job interview is a nervous nightmare of single- word responses and missed opportunities. To Willie Johnson, 27, the job interview is an encounter with the unknown, steeped in mystery and littered with hidden traps. The three underemployed North Philadelphia residents are among a group of 15 who don't lack job skills so much as they lack the knowledge to market themselves properly.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | By Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank Willis told his wife he was going into Philadelphia for a job interview at a motel near the airport. Police say that interview - whether it occurred or was even scheduled - may be the key to Willis' murder Saturday in the parking lot of the Airport Days Inn on Island Avenue. Willis, 33, a father of two and resident of Lawnside, N.J., was found shot four times, slumped in his 1986 Buick Skylark. Police said he apparently never even opened the door. Witnesses told police he had been killed by a woman who fired a gun through his car window.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Larry Eichel
Don't cry too many tears for Linda Chavez. She may be a fine human being, and she seems to have done far more than most of us to help the less fortunate. But her protestations to the contrary, she is not the latest victim of the politics of personal destruction. When she took her name out of consideration for secretary of labor yesterday, denying any suggestion that she'd been shoved out the door by allies of the president-elect, it was because of what she had done to herself, not anything that had been done to her. She had committed a major political mistake, one that her candidacy could not survive.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1995 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We've all experienced it: Searching through the closet before a job interview only to turn away unsatisfied. In many cases, the appropriate outfit is there, but it isn't the "perfect" one. But for some women, there simply is no outfit. "For me, it's a problem because I don't have that many clothes," said Josephine Delgado, 18, of Philadelphia. "Your appearance is a big bonus. If you go to an interview looking nice, they'll notice, and you have a better chance of getting the job. " Delgado, a former job-training program participant, found work a few months ago but said she wishes someone had helped with her interview appearance.
LIVING
February 9, 1997 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, it probably comes down to a gut reaction. Even as corporations try to make the hiring process more objective - with tests and "insightful" behavioral questions - a job generally is won or lost face to face. At the job interview. Skill, experience and past performance all are factors in an employer's decision, but experts say that the impression a job seeker makes in person can prove to be the most important. "It's the be-all and end-all," says Paul Falcone, author of two books on interviews and hiring who works as manager of employee relations and employment at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, Calif.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | By Nedra Lindsey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A man awoke in the woods yesterday afternoon with a pillowcase over his head and bloodstained clothing, but no recollection of how he had gotten there, authorities said. A disoriented Scott Weiseberg, 18, of Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery County, stumbled from the thickets near Warren Street into a nearby business, whose employees notified authorities at 2:30 p.m. "We were surprised," said an employee at Fyth Lab, a contract engineering and software service. "It was just a strange situation.
NEWS
January 19, 2006
ILIKE TO think of Supreme Court nominations as a chance to be part of a job interview, with us as the employer. We got to hear from Judge Alito, and as a prospective employer, I am smelling something funny. His interview answers are different from what his resume shows. I get the feeling he is not telling us the truth, which is not a good thing for a judge. One of the biggest red flags was his saying he lied during past interviews because he knew that's what they wanted to hear.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / DAVID T. FOSTER 3D
Forty-five participants in the Phil-a-Job program learned all about dressing for success at the "Grooming for the World of Work" program yesterday at the Opportunities Industrialization Center at 1231 N. Broad St. The workshop taught participants ages 14 and 15 how to dress for a job interview, how to dress for the job and about skin and hair care and makeup on the job. It was part of the Phil-a-Job summer employment and training program for youths...
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NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
'Hello there Anne was a Drexel University senior completing her final human resources co-op at the Sheraton-Maui in January 2010. One night after work, she met up with friends and friends-of-friends at a bar. "I'm David," said one man she didn't know. Then later, he said his name was Freddie. "You said you're David. Why did you give me two names?" she asked. "I didn't want you to forget me," said the then-long-haired, headband-wearing Maui native, who was home working construction after earning his chemistry degree from Missouri's Lindenwood University.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
IT'S A MUG SHOT that's been seen around the world. It shows the face of Shanesha Taylor, a distraught mother of two, tears streaming down her face. Taylor was arrested on child-abuse charges last month after leaving her 2-year-old and 6-month-old sons locked in a hot car in Scottsdale, Ariz., while on a job interview. Most of us who read about what happened turned away from Taylor's anguish. Not Amanda Bishop. The 24-year-old New Jersey resident got busy, launching an online fundraising drive that has raised more than $100,000 for Taylor.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job interviewers are looking for something. But what? And how do you answer those intentionally tricky questions? Here are ways to navigate the minefield of the interview room. Interviewers want job applicants to be likable, to stand out, to ask questions. That's part of what business writer Jeff Haden says in this LinkedIn post titled "What Interviewers Wish They Could Tell Every Job Candidate. " At the end of an interview, according to Haden, employers should like it when you "do what great salespeople do and ask for the job. " Then, follow up. Employers appreciate a note of thanks.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job-seekers worry how they will be perceived in person by employers, and for good reason. Likability, charisma, and - if you are ever so lucky - the "halo effect" play a major role at a job interview. Becoming more likable is the goal of many job-seekers, or should be, according to this Q&A with the author of a book, Likeonomics , at jobs.aol.com. The book's author, Rohit Bhargava, says likeonomics can be learned, and comes naturally to some figures, such as Bill Clinton. He advocates trying to connect personally with job interviewers.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
By George Parry Dear Internal Revenue Service: Regarding your targeting of conservatives before the presidential election, I found last week's testimony by your former commissioner to be very reassuring. As he explained it, what appeared to be your intentional and politically motivated punitive, totalitarian, and chilling measures against conservative groups and individuals in a clandestine effort to affect the outcome of the election were, in fact, simply the inadvertent consequences of "horrible customer service" provided by a bunch of flunkies in Cincinnati.
SPORTS
March 12, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Narberth native Peter Pelberg moved from Atlanta to a business incubator in New York City, he missed one big thing: friends who shared his fitness goals. "I played club tennis for four years in college, so I never had an issue finding someone else to run or lift weights with," said Pelberg, 24, who studied at Emory University. "When I moved to New York City, I wasn't so fortunate. It was difficult to find others who shared my fitness goals, and when I did find someone else, scheduling became an issue.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Maria Sudekum, Associated Press
DEARBORN, Mo. - To announce one of the biggest events of their lives together, Cindy and Mark Hill returned to the place where it all began - the high school where they became sweethearts in the 1970s. Surrounded by family and friends, the two were introduced Friday as winners in this week's huge Powerball lottery - an extraordinary stroke of luck that gives them half of the $588 million jackpot. The nostalgic high school homecoming seemed to reflect the couple's hopes of staying true to their roots and living simply, at least as simply as possible for winners of one of the biggest lottery prizes in history.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Need a job? Smartphone applications by the dozens offer help. This selection can provide you with a nearly instant resume, give pointers for getting and surviving interviews, and even assist you in quitting a job with flair. Pocket Resume , $2.99 for Android and Apple, is by Mani Ghasemlou. About 30 seconds after I'd opened the app for the first time, it accessed my LinkedIn account - with my permission - and generated a bare-bones resume from my profile information on that social-networking site.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Some time back, Marc Voci, a 25-year veteran hairstylist and owner of the Marc Voci Salon and Colorbar in Folsom, Pa., decided to rebrand his salon. He hung a sign on the wall that reads Happiness and set up the Colorbar, where customers loosen up with a glass of wine and surf the Internet, while stylists mix hair colors nearby. He gave away monthly makeovers, drawing on lessons he learned as a child when his beautician mom would volunteer a wash and curl for a struggling client in Voci's Southwest Philadelphia neighborhood.
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