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NEWS
August 11, 2015
ISSUE | SHALE TAX Levy means job loss It is dangerously misleading to ignore the fact that even higher energy taxes jeopardize jobs ("How Pa. can get severance tax right," Aug. 2). Responsible shale development is driving a petrochemical rebirth, specifically at Marcus Hook. Sunoco Logistics' Mariner East 2 pipeline is expected to support an estimated 30,000 construction jobs, generate nearly $62 million in tax revenues, and provide $4.2 billion in economic activity. In addition to the more than $2.3 billion in taxes paid by the natural gas industry since 2008, Pennsylvania imposes a shale-gas impact tax that's generated more than $850 million since 2011 for communities throughout the commonwealth.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | BY GEORGE McNAMARA
Lots of things in our area are described as "best kept secrets. " As the result of a first-hand experience, I have an addition to the list. Forty Plus of Philadelphia is an organization for unemployed professionals, executives and managers who have attained the seasoned age of 40 and are actively seeking a new position. Forty Plus is not an employment agency or job placement service. It is a self-help group that provides the personal training and business atmosphere to effectively conduct a job search.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Garrah Morgan was the kind of daughter who called her 88-year-old father every morning just to make sure he was all right. She was the kind of neighbor who always waved when other residents passed by, and the kind of woman who volunteered her time to care of wounded animals. So when residents of the prestigious Centennial Lakes section on the south end of Medford learned that their 53-year-old neighbor had been shot and killed by her husband, John, before he turned the shotgun on himself, they reacted with varying degrees of sadness and anger.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The economy lost 201,000 jobs in January, making it the worst month in almost five years, but the weakness was caused mostly by the Blizzard of '96, the government said yesterday. The lost jobs pushed the nation's unemployment rate to 5.8 percent of the labor force from 5.6 percent in December. The government said that last month's job loss was the largest since April 1991, while the unemployment rate was the highest since last April. Both numbers surprised economists, who had forecast an increase of 46,000 jobs last month.
NEWS
June 28, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Profaci can tell things are tougher than usual at his Sparkle Clean Laundermat in hard-time Clementon because of all the wet laundry coming through the door. Unemployed people are saving precious dollars by washing clothes in their bathtubs, then lugging in dripping loads to use Sparkle Clean's dryers, Profaci said. "I never saw that before," he added. "Everybody is struggling. " Meanwhile, in middle-class Marlton, all is not as sound as it seems, as growing numbers of residents find themselves jobless.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's suburbs gained 28,000 jobs last year while the city managed not to lose any, making it one of the region's best years in nearly a decade, new job figures show. For the entire metropolitan area, employment grew at a rate of 1.3 percent - still slow by national standards, but much faster than many economists had been predicting. Growth in business-service and trade jobs more than made up for continued losses in manufacturing , defense work and consolidation in financial services.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1997 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell and Gov. Ridge, allied to save rail jobs across the state, say they'll be either great friends or formidable foes to the two corporations now structuring a takeover of Conrail. With 8,000 Pennsylvania jobs at stake - around 3,100 in the Philadelphia region, according to Conrail officials - Rendell and Ridge yesterday pledged to get even more jobs out of a new deal or "go to war" to keep jobs already here. The mayor and the governor met for an hour at the governor's residence with CEOs John W. Snow and David R. Goode of CSX and Norfolk Southern, respectively.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1998 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia is about to lose another corporate headquarters in a merger of two of the oldest insurance companies operating in the United States. It's too soon to say how many jobs would be lost in Philadelphia, say the merger partners, General Accident PLC and Commercial Union PLC, both worldwide insurance firms based in London. But the U.S. headquarters of the merged company will be in Boston, the current U.S. headquarters of Commercial Union, the announcement said. For 99 years, Philadelphia has been the U.S. headquarters of the other partner, General Accident, which employs 1,300 workers in its corporate offices across from Independence Hall on Walnut Street in Center City.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1996 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two of Philadelphia's leading companies, SmithKline Beecham and Independence Blue Cross, announced yesterday that they were expanding operations in Center City, adding a combined 675 jobs to the city's shaky employment base. Joined by a pleased Mayor Rendell, top executives of the health-care companies said their decisions to enlarge their presence in Philadelphia signaled their optimism about the city's future. "The mayor and his administration have fostered a positive business climate for expanding companies like ours," said G. Fred DiBona Jr., president and CEO of Independence Blue Cross.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Jane Reynolds and Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
For nearly 11 years, Renee Steiger worked for the Mobil Oil Corp. She relocated six times along the East Coast, from Boston to Florida, and worked in eight marketing, sales and management positions. She aspired to become president of the corporation some day. Then came the dreaded corporate downsizing. Steiger, a 35-year-old Philadelpia resident, began to see jobs disappear. She even helped Mobil carry out its cost-cutting measures. But instead of waiting for her own job to be eliminated, Steiger took action and decided to strike out on her own. She applied for a severance package at Mobil to get her through the transition, sought a small-business loan, quit the company in July, and is now the proud owner of a Takeout Taxi franchise in Cherry Hill - a business that delivers food to homes or businesses from restaurants that don't have their own delivery service.
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NEWS
August 11, 2015
ISSUE | SHALE TAX Levy means job loss It is dangerously misleading to ignore the fact that even higher energy taxes jeopardize jobs ("How Pa. can get severance tax right," Aug. 2). Responsible shale development is driving a petrochemical rebirth, specifically at Marcus Hook. Sunoco Logistics' Mariner East 2 pipeline is expected to support an estimated 30,000 construction jobs, generate nearly $62 million in tax revenues, and provide $4.2 billion in economic activity. In addition to the more than $2.3 billion in taxes paid by the natural gas industry since 2008, Pennsylvania imposes a shale-gas impact tax that's generated more than $850 million since 2011 for communities throughout the commonwealth.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's employer payrolls expanded by 280,000 jobs in May, the U.S. Department of Labor reported Friday, with increased hiring across industry sectors. The unemployment rate rose slightly, to 5.5 percent from 5.4 percent in April, but was down from 6.3 percent last May. The strong employment gain last month has Wall Street expecting the Federal Reserve to move by October to increase interest rates, to keep the economy from overheating. Cranes and scaffolding in Center City and West Philadelphia tell the jobs story here, where, like elsewhere around the country, construction employment is particularly robust.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The full extent of Atlantic City's economic turmoil showed up in October's metropolitan-area employment report, released Tuesday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Atlantic County, which is home to Atlantic City, lost 9,900 jobs in the 12 months ended Oct. 31, as four of the city's dozen casinos closed. A fifth, the Trump Taj Mahal, could close Dec. 20. The next-biggest job loss nationally - 2,200 - was recorded in Davenport, Iowa, and two cities just across the Mississippi River in Illinois.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
UIL HOLDINGS, the Connecticut utility company chosen by Mayor Nutter to purchase PGW for nearly $2 billion, has killed its offer indefinitely. "Unfortunately, there was not enough political will to get this done," said UIL spokesman Michael West. "Our investment apparently wasn't that attractive to some City Council members in leadership, so we felt that we needed to exit the deal at this time. "We are disappointed by not having an opportunity to represent the facts of it, and clearly there's no action by Philadelphia City Council to introduce a bill anywhere in the foreseeable future . . . We knew we had a strong case.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. payrolls grew by 209,000 jobs in July - less than expected, but still enough to begin to erase the jobs deficit created by the recession, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. Even the rising unemployment rate, which ticked up by a tenth of a point to 6.2 percent, is an indicator of growth. That's because, to count as unemployed, a jobless person must actively be seeking work. As employment prospects improve, some people who had been sitting on the sidelines may reenter the labor market and start sending out resum├ęs, but may not immediately find work.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
A new look at job trends in Philadelphia and other old Northeastern cities over the last four decades shows real hope of reversing the erosion of employment first triggered by the decline of urban manufacturing. It's just that those hopes have materialized in other metro regions, not this one. A Center City District report released last week found that one in four Philadelphia jobs has been wiped out since 1970, which stands in stark contrast to the success of New York, Washington, and Boston in registering job gains over the same period.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
THE ONLY problem with Mayor Nutter using taxpayer money to take repeated trips is that he keeps coming back. He should have been sent packing by the voters. By the way, Mr. Mayor, while you were away, Kraft/Nabisco announced that they will be closing their Northeast Philadelphia plant and moving operations to Mexico, resulting in more job loss here. Timothy T. Gass Philadelphia In the photo album accompanying the story, I didn't see any photos of the mayor with union officials.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
October's jobless rate, pegged Friday at 7.3 percent, was up slightly from September. But the number's meaning is a source of monthly public confusion. Here are some explanations. The arm of government that computes the unemployment rate is the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics. This FAQ on the bureau's site explains how the number is reached and what it means. It starts with the question "Why does the government collect statistics on the unemployed?" When a willing worker is unemployed, everybody loses, it explains.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
You might not be staring at unemployment - though millions still are without work - but it's always good to review ways to cut expenses so your money will last to the end of the month. Some "easy ways to cut back on spending every day" are collected by Maitland Greer, a blogger at Manilla.com. Most are common sense, but we need constant reminding. Carry your lunch to work and eat out less. Don't buy a lot of "dry-clean only" clothes. As far as possible, don't buy cable-TV services you never watch.
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