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Job Market

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NEWS
May 14, 1992 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Jack Carr, manager of the Northeast Jobs Center office, has seen a lot of people down on their luck during his 31 years working in the state unemployment system, but nothing like the bad fortune of the last two years. "You have people who have put 20 or 30 years at a job, and now they're out of work," he observed. "You see so many capable people out of work. This is one of the worst (periods) I've seen. " Since the end of November, the Northeast office, part of the state's Department of Labor and Industry, on Grant Avenue just west of Ashton Road, has seen the number of unemployment claims jump from 4,500 to 9,500.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Price hurls statistics like darts, hoping that one or the other will strike home and make you start thinking about the changing nature of the American workforce. Like this one: According to a 1986 U.S. Department of Labor study, by 2000, a majority of all new jobs will require training beyond high school. And this: 83 percent of workers entering the job market between 1988 and 2000 will be women, minorities or immigrants. Yet few schools have begun preparing students - especially women and minorities - to meet the changing needs, Price said.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Ten years ago, students entering college were told to specialize. Today, students about to enter college are being told that it pays to have a well-rounded background. Companies today are looking for employees who will be able to adapt to changes, especially now with corporate mergers becoming more common, said Patricia Smith, executive director of Operation Native Talent, a program offered by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce that matches job seekers with prospective employers.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arthur Shostak, a Drexel University professor and author, likes to talk about the future. On Thursday, he will discuss the job market in 2010 at the Center for Arts and Technology, 1580 Charlestown Rd., Phoenixville. Shostak's topics will include evolving relations between humans and machines, telepower, smart energy innovation and the dangers of job wars, mind wars and class wars. Shostak's credentials as a futurist include membership in the World Future Society and futurist consultant for several Fortune 500 corporations.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Representatives of business, education and government recently met at the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce in Media to plan a countywide symposium to discuss the county's job market and the need for job training in areas with a large demand for workers. The symposium was tentatively set for April 30. Among those attending the planning meeting were representatives of U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.); the Delaware County Intermediate Unit and Vocational Education Department; Delaware County Community College; the Delaware County Chapter of the AFL-CIO; Delaware County Council; the Delaware County Partnership for Economic Development; the Pennsylvania State Education Association, and a number of private-sector business people.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leaning against car hoods and a brick wall, eight men chatted or smoked cigarettes in the cool of a morning that soon would start to sizzle. While much of the city slept yesterday, these few waited restlessly for a chance to go to work, a chance to risk their backs and their necks lifting, fastening or balancing on giant beams perhaps hundreds of feet in the air. But it was only 6:20 a.m., and the door to the two-story glass, iron and stucco...
BUSINESS
December 23, 2011 | By Daniel Wagner and Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In in the latest sign that the economy is surging at year's end, unemployment claims have dropped to the lowest level since April 2008, long before anyone realized that the nation was in a recession. Claims fell by 4,000 last week to 364,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. It was the third straight weekly drop. The four-week average of claims, a less volatile gauge, fell for the 11th time in 13 weeks and stands at the lowest since June 2008. While the economy remains vulnerable to threats, particularly a recession in Europe, the steady improvement in the job market is unquestionable.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2011 | By Pallavi Gogoi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Encouraging economic reports pushed stocks higher Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 61 points, its third gain in a row. The number of people applying for unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest level since April 2008, the latest sign that the job market is healing. It was the third week in a row that applications fell. The Conference Board also reported that its measure of future economic activity had a big increase last month. It was the second straight gain, signaling that the U.S. economy was picking up speed and the risk of another recession was fading.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2001 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With announcements of massive layoffs by large corporations and a tanking stock market, newly minted college graduates could face a tougher job market than last year's class did. While corporate recruiters are still showing up on campuses in record numbers, they are cutting back on hiring in some cases. Moreover, some colleges said a handful of recruiters canceled campus interviews this spring, noting the economic slowdown. But while the era of employers tripping over one another to land young hires may be over, college career directors and employers locally and nationally say the job outlook for this spring's 2.3 million graduates is bright.
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NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
DENISE THOMPSON used to think she had the most stable job in the world - working on an overnight shift at a large Mellon Bank office in Center City, processing checks. It was what she did five nights a week for 17 years. Then one evening in March 2009, the company told her and her co-workers it was laying off her entire shift, due to both the Great Recession and changes in check-processing technology. About 5 1/2 years later, Thompson - now 49, living in West Philadelphia - never found another job. At first, she said, she wasn't looking too hard for new work because she lives mortgage-free in a home that she'd inherited from her mom. But soon, the everyday bills began to pile up. When she finally hit the job market in earnest, she learned that her experience in check-processing didn't match well with the few openings that were out there - and the longer she went without a job on her resume, the fewer responses she got. "I thought for sure that my skills could transfer," Thompson said, although she now thinks her lack of customer-service experience has held her back.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The unemployment rate ticked upward 0.1 percentage point to 6.2 percent last week, and July marked the first time since 1997 that the United States has booked six consecutive 200,000-plus months of payroll growth. In other words, "we're in the midst of the best labor market conditions in more than a decade and a half," Janney Montgomery Scott's Guy LeBas, chief fixed income strategist, noted Friday. Better job markets could mean rising interest rates, and in that environment, floating-rate bond funds are a decent place to invest, says Bradford Bernstein, senior vice president of wealth management in UBS's Philadelphia office.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. payrolls grew by 209,000 jobs in July - less than expected, but still enough to begin to erase the jobs deficit created by the recession, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. Even the rising unemployment rate, which ticked up by a tenth of a point to 6.2 percent, is an indicator of growth. That's because, to count as unemployed, a jobless person must actively be seeking work. As employment prospects improve, some people who had been sitting on the sidelines may reenter the labor market and start sending out resumés, but may not immediately find work.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
While she's been at college, senior Stefanie Lechner, 23, has been watching the economy. "It doesn't frighten me," she said Friday, less than two weeks away from graduation from Temple University. Maybe it's because of Friday's champagne-popping report from the U.S. Labor Department - an unemployment rate of 6.3 percent in April, the lowest since September 2008, when it was 6.1 percent, and a not-shabby payroll expansion of 288,000 jobs. That being said, Lechner, graduating with a degree in therapeutic recreation, will soon begin an unpaid internship - a career step she believes will lead to full-time employment in the same organization by year's end. "It's a great opportunity," she said.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campus Philly was created in 2000 amid hand-wringing over the Philadelphia region's bumper crop of college graduates leaving the area, diplomas packed in their suitcases. Then, the organization's job was to sell the city to students in the hope that they would stay. With the city's popularity growing among young people, that sale has been made, said Deborah Diamond, the organization's president. Now, she said, the 392,491 students enrolled in 101 area colleges are asking, "How can I stay here?
NEWS
March 13, 2014
ATTORNEY General Corbett accepted $600,000 from Jerry Sandusky's Second Mile Foundation as he was running for governor, during which time he let Jerry himself run free. Gov. Corbett later awarded Second Mile a $3 million grant. Gov. Corbett accepted lavish gifts from people who later landed lucrative state contracts. He attends gala birthday soirees in his honor hosted by gas companies. Gov. Corbett boasts that he reduced unemployment. He does not mention that the labor force was reduced as 74,000 Pennsylvanians exited the job market in 2013.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova University Law School said Tuesday that it would double the number of full scholarships available to members of the incoming 2014 class, to as many as 50. The scholarships would cover the full three years of law school, said dean John Y. Gotanda. Law schools nationwide have been under pressure to recruit new students as applications have fallen in the face of declining job opportunities for newly minted lawyers, and many have cut their enrollments in recognition of that trend.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hours before the doors even opened, a throng of eager job-seekers began lining up Tuesday to look for work. A short time later, several thousand people packed into the Collingswood Ballroom for the semiannual job fair sponsored by Camden County. They freshened up their resumés, sought career counseling, and tried to make a good impression in brief interviews with recruiters. Nick Cerasi, 85, of Blackwood, drove his grandson, Jeffrey Bryan, to the event, which drew more than 125 prospective employers.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MARK MERCER had filled out more job applications than he could count, and after two years of trying to snag a steady gig the old-fashioned way, he decided in June to try a new approach. Decked out in black shoes and a black suit - the only one he owns - Mercer stands almost daily in the heart of the city's financial district, on the southeast corner of 19th and Market streets, with a stack of resumes and a huge sign: I Don't Want Your Change. I NEED A JOB. Mercer, 54, was fired in 2011 after four years in a customer-service job in Bucks County for refusing to yell at a technician, he said.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Wednesday that the U.S. economy was gradually improving but emphasized that the Federal Reserve was not locked into any timetable for scaling back policies aimed at promoting growth. He told Congress there was no "preset course" and that any decision to reduce its $85 billion-a-month bond-buying program will depend on how the economy performs. He said the Fed could maintain or increase those purchases if it sensed the economy was weakening.
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