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Job Market

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NEWS
May 14, 1992 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Jack Carr, manager of the Northeast Jobs Center office, has seen a lot of people down on their luck during his 31 years working in the state unemployment system, but nothing like the bad fortune of the last two years. "You have people who have put 20 or 30 years at a job, and now they're out of work," he observed. "You see so many capable people out of work. This is one of the worst (periods) I've seen. " Since the end of November, the Northeast office, part of the state's Department of Labor and Industry, on Grant Avenue just west of Ashton Road, has seen the number of unemployment claims jump from 4,500 to 9,500.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Price hurls statistics like darts, hoping that one or the other will strike home and make you start thinking about the changing nature of the American workforce. Like this one: According to a 1986 U.S. Department of Labor study, by 2000, a majority of all new jobs will require training beyond high school. And this: 83 percent of workers entering the job market between 1988 and 2000 will be women, minorities or immigrants. Yet few schools have begun preparing students - especially women and minorities - to meet the changing needs, Price said.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Ten years ago, students entering college were told to specialize. Today, students about to enter college are being told that it pays to have a well-rounded background. Companies today are looking for employees who will be able to adapt to changes, especially now with corporate mergers becoming more common, said Patricia Smith, executive director of Operation Native Talent, a program offered by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce that matches job seekers with prospective employers.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Representatives of business, education and government recently met at the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce in Media to plan a countywide symposium to discuss the county's job market and the need for job training in areas with a large demand for workers. The symposium was tentatively set for April 30. Among those attending the planning meeting were representatives of U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.); the Delaware County Intermediate Unit and Vocational Education Department; Delaware County Community College; the Delaware County Chapter of the AFL-CIO; Delaware County Council; the Delaware County Partnership for Economic Development; the Pennsylvania State Education Association, and a number of private-sector business people.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arthur Shostak, a Drexel University professor and author, likes to talk about the future. On Thursday, he will discuss the job market in 2010 at the Center for Arts and Technology, 1580 Charlestown Rd., Phoenixville. Shostak's topics will include evolving relations between humans and machines, telepower, smart energy innovation and the dangers of job wars, mind wars and class wars. Shostak's credentials as a futurist include membership in the World Future Society and futurist consultant for several Fortune 500 corporations.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leaning against car hoods and a brick wall, eight men chatted or smoked cigarettes in the cool of a morning that soon would start to sizzle. While much of the city slept yesterday, these few waited restlessly for a chance to go to work, a chance to risk their backs and their necks lifting, fastening or balancing on giant beams perhaps hundreds of feet in the air. But it was only 6:20 a.m., and the door to the two-story glass, iron and stucco...
BUSINESS
December 23, 2011 | By Daniel Wagner and Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In in the latest sign that the economy is surging at year's end, unemployment claims have dropped to the lowest level since April 2008, long before anyone realized that the nation was in a recession. Claims fell by 4,000 last week to 364,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. It was the third straight weekly drop. The four-week average of claims, a less volatile gauge, fell for the 11th time in 13 weeks and stands at the lowest since June 2008. While the economy remains vulnerable to threats, particularly a recession in Europe, the steady improvement in the job market is unquestionable.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2011 | By Pallavi Gogoi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Encouraging economic reports pushed stocks higher Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 61 points, its third gain in a row. The number of people applying for unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest level since April 2008, the latest sign that the job market is healing. It was the third week in a row that applications fell. The Conference Board also reported that its measure of future economic activity had a big increase last month. It was the second straight gain, signaling that the U.S. economy was picking up speed and the risk of another recession was fading.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2001 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With announcements of massive layoffs by large corporations and a tanking stock market, newly minted college graduates could face a tougher job market than last year's class did. While corporate recruiters are still showing up on campuses in record numbers, they are cutting back on hiring in some cases. Moreover, some colleges said a handful of recruiters canceled campus interviews this spring, noting the economic slowdown. But while the era of employers tripping over one another to land young hires may be over, college career directors and employers locally and nationally say the job outlook for this spring's 2.3 million graduates is bright.
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NEWS
July 19, 2016
By Matt Bergheiser Imagine applying to 42 jobs in three months and not landing a single interview. Imagine what it feels like to realize that even jobs at the lowest rungs of the career ladder require online applications when you haven't turned on a computer in years. Imagine being so desperate for income that you'll ride two trains and a bus for a chance at back-breaking day labor that might not even materialize. This story line is typical for citizens returning from prison, as a criminal conviction is often a career-ender, creating devastating impacts for individuals, families, and communities.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The nation's roller-coaster job market rocketed to a peak in June after plunging even lower than originally reported in May. The U.S. Labor Department's report released Friday morning shows that the nation added an impressive 287,000 jobs in June, a marked contrast to the 38,000 jobs added in May. That number was revised downward on Friday to a meager 11,000. While economists all agreed that May's meager number was an anomaly, the June report amounted to a giant exhale, as Georgetown University professor and former U.S. Department of Labor chief economist Harry Holzer wrote in an email.
NEWS
April 5, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Brain drain? The editorial "With a whimper" (March 24) highlights Pennsylvania's failure to pass a budget that adequately invests in human services. The state legislature has repeatedly failed to pass a budget that raises new revenue. As a result, human services have been sorely underfunded and could face drastic cuts if revenue is not increased this year. Failing to invest in human services has serious implications for the nonprofit job market.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016
Has America's job market broken? Are we becoming a nation of part-timers? Of underemployed young people and can't-afford-to-be-retirees stitching together low-wage workweeks? That's one view of a "gig economy," in which - except for company owners - all our cars are taxis, our homes are hotels, and none of our weekly hours qualifies for company benefits. So we have to buy high-deductible health plans on the not-so-free market? "Gig work reflects the more flexible or fragmented work arrangements of many in today's labor market," namely Uber and Lyft drivers, TaskRabbit "freelance laborers," Upwork free-lancers, and Etsy salespeople, writes John Silvia, the Pennsylvania native who serves as chief economist at Wells Fargo & Co., in a recent report on the "gig" economy.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Jennifer Schneible and Abigail R. Hall
For a new college graduate, finding a job is stressful. That first job is more than a paycheck. It represents the accumulation of hours of hard work and a start on a stable future. In a job market dominated by resum├ęs, connections, and previous work experience, college students will often turn to internships, paid and unpaid, to gain a competitive edge. While paid internships are usually seen as similar to other jobs, unpaid internships have come under increased scrutiny. Critics contend that since employers know students are desperate for experience, workplaces can abuse their interns with long hours and poor work conditions, all without compensation.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When, after 28 years, Beverly Wiker lost her administrative job at Pepperidge Farm's plant in Downingtown, "it felt like a death in the family," she said. "I was in shock," she said, sitting in an Exton classroom with other unemployed people, who have become her new, extended family, united by their unwilling membership in the world of long-term joblessness. What also unites this group is renewed hope generated by a program launched last month in Chester County targeting the long-term unemployed.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two things may be happening - simultaneously - to Sandy Ellis-Johnson, 59, caught in a long cycle of part-time jobs when she needs full-time work. She may actually get a job, and she may become homeless as soon as Monday. The owner of the house where she's living is moving tenants out to make repairs. And with her part-time income of $7.25 an hour for 20 hours a week, Ellis-Johnson doesn't make enough to find another place. More than 7.5 million part-time American workers are older than 50, and for most of them, 4 out of 5, part-time work is a choice - with income as a motivator, but also job satisfaction and a desire to stay connected to the work world.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Job-market improvements mean more people feel free to change jobs. But leaving a job can be difficult, even on the best of terms. Here are some guidelines for making a graceful exit. "Since the days of being loyal to one organization for an entire career are long gone, moving from one company to another is something that all of us will probably do," writes Ron Ashkenas, a contributor at Forbes.com. But, he asks in this post, "why do talented, bright, and capable people figuratively burn their bridges behind them?"
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's businesses added a whopping 321,000 jobs in November, demonstrating strength in the job market. But Kenny Dubin, who runs a recruiting company in Bala Cynwyd, didn't need Friday's report from the U.S. Labor Department to evaluate the economy. "October and November were the two best direct-hire months in the history of my company," said Dubin, chief executive of the Dubin Group, founded in 1998. Not only did the nation's payrolls add 321,000 jobs in November, beating expectations, but the Labor Department revised data from earlier months, adding 44,000 jobs to the numbers reported in September and October.
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