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Job Performance

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NEWS
June 20, 1989 | By Frank Greve, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Workers who tested positive on pre-employment drug tests were substantially more likely to be absent or fired in the months that followed, according to a two-year landmark study of the relationship between drug use and job performance. The U.S. Postal Service says the finding justifies its plan to exclude applicants who test positive for drugs from the world's fourth-largest workforce beginning in December. But the study, while showing a powerful connection between cocaine use and job performance, showed only a slight relationship for marijuana use. And, when the results are compared with other surveys, drugs appear less related to job performance than alcohol abuse, smoking or even the age and sex of workers.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
Deptford Township's director of community development, Robert Marmion, who was fired in March, has been given a two-month reprieve. The "cooling-off period," as Marmion described it during an interview earlier this week, was agreed to at a March 20 meeting among Marmion, his attorney, the township's solicitor and several members of the Township Council. Between now and June 1, Marmion's attorney Bruce Hasbrouck and township solicitor Eugene McCaffrey Jr. will try to determine whether proper civil service procedures were followed when Marmion was fired last month, Marmion said.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's job approval rating dropped to 46 percent among New Jersey voters, one of his lowest, in a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday. At the same time, President Obama's approval rating hit an all-time low in New Jersey of 41 percent among registered voters, according to a Monmouth University/Asbury Park Press poll also released Wednesday. In both instances, the polls said the drops were driven by declines among women. While 51 percent of men surveyed in the Quinnipiac poll approved of Christie, among women 43 percent approved and 48 percent disapproved.
NEWS
June 8, 2000 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Apparently sickened by the prospect of losing her job, Borough Manager Victoria Keller has not shown up for work since May 31, the day after Borough Council called an executive meeting to discuss her job performance. Keller has been calling in sick since then, said her attorney Richard Patton, because a doctor had determined that the stress in her current work environment is making her physically ill. Officials have made no decision about Keller's fate. But she will be a topic for public discussion at Tuesday night's council meeting, during which, Borough Council President Richard Hirschfield said, "some action" will be taken.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Citing a litany of problems, the Chester Upland Board of Control fired the school district's personnel director, Marvin K. Hackett, yesterday. Hackett, a former Delaware State University personnel director, had spent less than a year on the job at a salary of $60,000 a year. At a meeting yesterday, the three-member control board, with member C.R. Pennoni absent, found him responsible for unsatisfactory performance, neglect of duty, insubordination, violation of the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and incompetence.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Ridge may be a golden boy around Erie, but in these parts he's seen as a bumbler, according to the latest Keystone Poll. As his job performance on a key local issue plummeted, his favor with the voters sank dramatically from earlier polls. Not surprisingly, his downfall poll relates to his handling of the Meyer Werft deal that would have pumped millions of dollars into the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Only 13 percent of the city residents polled thought Ridge had done a good or excellent job negotiating that deal.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The Magnolia Council last night unanimously accepted the resignation of borough tax collector Maria Capuzzi. Capuzzi said in a letter received by the council Tuesday that she wanted her resignation retroactive to March 19. She did not give a reason in her letter for quitting, but she had been under fire from the council. Contacted at her home after last night's meeting, Capuzzi declined to comment on her resignation. Last month, Capuzzi said she had not been to work since the middle of February and had failed to attend three council meetings called especially to discuss her job performance and alleged record-keeping problems in the tax collection office because of "nervous tension, stress and pressure" related to her job. At that time, Mayor Catherine M. Quigley said Capuzzi had continued to use a record-keeping method that the council twice last year asked her to change.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The ethics allegations surrounding New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez have taken a steep toll on his public image, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday. The poll gave Menendez, a Democrat, an upside-down approval rating - 36 percent of New Jersey voters approve of his job performance, 41 percent disapprove. That's a 15-point drop from Jan. 23, when Quinnipiac last checked voter views on Menendez and found that 51 percent approved of his job performance.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
IMAGINED texts between Your Favorite Columnist and His Favorite Italian. STU: Yo, Dominick. how u feel about #Coatesville? DOMINICK: U mean the 2 dagos passing gas? STU: That's an offensive term. DOM: Gas? STU: Dagos. DOM: Those mamalukes put all Italians in a vile light. STU: U sure they r Italian? DOM: Is the pope Argentinian? Their names r Como and Donato. STU: U saying most Italians don't talk like the mamalukes?
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Two years after he left office, there seems to be an enduring yearning for Ed Rendell. The former Democratic governor is all over the media, and a poll this week found Rendell leading his successor, Republican Gov. Corbett, in a hypothetical match. "He's endearing, he's blunt, and he's addicted to public policy and politics - in it for the long haul," said Larry Ceisler, a Democratic consultant. "He makes good copy. " And Rendell was recently approached by a key adviser to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who tried to recruit him to reenter politics and run for mayor of the Big Apple.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's job approval rating dropped to 46 percent among New Jersey voters, one of his lowest, in a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday. At the same time, President Obama's approval rating hit an all-time low in New Jersey of 41 percent among registered voters, according to a Monmouth University/Asbury Park Press poll also released Wednesday. In both instances, the polls said the drops were driven by declines among women. While 51 percent of men surveyed in the Quinnipiac poll approved of Christie, among women 43 percent approved and 48 percent disapproved.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former deputy superintendent of public works is suing Franklin Township, saying he was fired without being given the reasons and the hearing guaranteed him under state law for veterans. Richard Yusko, an Army veteran, submitted his suit against the Gloucester County township Friday, citing a law sometimes referred to as the Veterans Tenure Act. Under the act, veterans who are public employees cannot be fired "except for good cause shown after a fair and impartial hearing, but such person shall hold his employment, position or office during good behavior, and shall not be removed for political reasons.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
IMAGINED texts between Your Favorite Columnist and His Favorite Italian. STU: Yo, Dominick. how u feel about #Coatesville? DOMINICK: U mean the 2 dagos passing gas? STU: That's an offensive term. DOM: Gas? STU: Dagos. DOM: Those mamalukes put all Italians in a vile light. STU: U sure they r Italian? DOM: Is the pope Argentinian? Their names r Como and Donato. STU: U saying most Italians don't talk like the mamalukes?
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Now there are five. Kate McGinty, a former Pennsylvania environmental protection secretary and adviser in the Clinton White House, is the latest candidate to declare for the 2014 Democratic nomination for governor. McGinty's entry into the race means U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz of Montgomery County will not have an uncontested shot at the support of activists and voters who yearn for a woman as governor. "I quit my day job," McGinty, daughter of a police officer from Northeast Philadelphia, said.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The ethics allegations surrounding New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez have taken a steep toll on his public image, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday. The poll gave Menendez, a Democrat, an upside-down approval rating - 36 percent of New Jersey voters approve of his job performance, 41 percent disapprove. That's a 15-point drop from Jan. 23, when Quinnipiac last checked voter views on Menendez and found that 51 percent approved of his job performance.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Two years after he left office, there seems to be an enduring yearning for Ed Rendell. The former Democratic governor is all over the media, and a poll this week found Rendell leading his successor, Republican Gov. Corbett, in a hypothetical match. "He's endearing, he's blunt, and he's addicted to public policy and politics - in it for the long haul," said Larry Ceisler, a Democratic consultant. "He makes good copy. " And Rendell was recently approached by a key adviser to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who tried to recruit him to reenter politics and run for mayor of the Big Apple.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Jon Cohen, Washington Post
Public impressions of Hillary Rodham Clinton are at an all-time high, with a large majority of Americans giving her positive reviews as the country's secretary of state and most wanting her to be a presidential candidate in 2016, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Overall, 57 percent of all Americans say they would back a Clinton candidacy, with support peaking among younger women. Among all women, 66 percent say they would support Clinton as a candidate for president in 2016; it is 75 percent among those under 50 and 54 percent among those aged 50 and up. Forty-nine percent of men back a Clinton bid, regardless of what side of 50 they are on. Clinton gets far higher support among independent women than men (68 vs. 52 percent)
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The next year is make or break for Gov. Corbett. It will help decide whether the Republican governor sails to a second four-year term, or labors to beat back a challenge from Democrats or from within his own party. So say Corbett's advisers and confidantes, who for months have been watching intently from the sidelines as the governor has struggled to bridge what they see as a disconnect between his work and the public's perception of his job performance, and of him personally.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new Pennsylvania poll bears some good news for Gov. Corbett and finds wide agreement in the electorate on the validity of global warming. Thanks to his handling of Hurricane Sandy, during which he was seen as a calm presence on statewide TV, Corbett gained a bump in his approval rating, according to a postelection survey of 1,489 registered voters by Quinnipiac University released Thursday. Forty percent of poll respondents approved of the job Corbett is doing, and 38 percent did not. The rest had no opinion.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama holds a six-point lead over Mitt Romney in a new Inquirer Pennsylvania Poll with just over nine full days of campaigning left for the Republican nominee to make a play for the state. Obama was the choice of 49 percent of likely voters, to 43 percent who backed Romney in the survey conducted for the newspaper by a bipartisan team of pollsters. The new numbers came out as one Republican group made a television ad buy Friday that might signal a last-minute Romney push in Pennsylvania.
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